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Is Taking BJJ and Judo At The Same Time A Good Idea?

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by cottonzway, Jul 5, 2005.

  1. cottonzway

    cottonzway ....

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    I have been taking BJJ now for a month and also have been taking some "informal classes" in Judo from a friend who is a Brown Belt for 4months or so. Here is the problem though. I am able to see him about 2x a week because he lives like 40 miles away from me. I haven't been learning formal Judo, but more so things I could maybe use in MMA. Some thtows, slams, holds, how to fall, ect. I just found out there is a Judo Dojo about 12 miles from me. I am thinking about signing up there. I just don't know if I will become too "grappler" like and if I can even learn anything being so new at both of the martial arts. I really like BJJ and I like what I have learned about Judo so far. I just don't know if I am going to "forget" that I was a boxer first and rely on the grappling. Also, are there any examples of guys in MMA who train in both BJJ and Judo? I thought about this and couldn't think of anyone. Any help on this would be greatly apperciated. Thanks.
     
  2. John O'Brien

    John O'Brien They call me Barnacle Bill.

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    Nothing wrong with learning both.
     
  3. colinm

    colinm Brown Belt

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    yeah man, definitely do them both. and just off the top of my head, nog did judo before he took up bjj.
     
  4. Coach D

    Coach D Banned Banned

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    So did Carlos Valente, and it doesn't get much better than that.
     
  5. TJS

    TJS Brown Belt

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    they blend toegether well. the fill the weaknesses the other leaves.
     
  6. cottonzway

    cottonzway ....

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    Very interesting as I wasn't expecting to see such a positive reply. I guess it's because there are so many BJJ guys on this site and thought that Judo was kind of "second rate" to some of the grapplers here. Not that I think that way (obviously as I highly respect Judo enough to already learn it) but to the MMA world in some parts. I'm pleasently suprised. :D

    I do have some concerns with getting too comfortable with grappling and losing sight of how I would like to fight. Sprawl and brawl. Do any of you guys out there who are strikers have issues with something like this? I am talking any type of grappling. Wrestling, sub wrestling, BJJ, Judo, ect. Going from a striker to learning more then two disiplines that are grappling. I want to learn grappling to defend more then anything. I don't think I would ever be good enough at any of those arts to try and use them if I were to fight against anyone who knows that part of the fight game. So I want to take these to get a concept, an idea how to escape and get to my feet. If the sub is there and it's safe, then take it but otherwise not to use it as my way to attack. Anyone else come from a striking background and tried to learn more then one type of grappling art?
     
  7. Gsoares**

    Gsoares** Banned Banned

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    I say do both but stray away from the pindowns in judo that give your back...

    the scarf hold pin down they teach in judo is a good pin but if the person on the bottom knows how to escape In bjj he will take your back.

    I got yelled at in bjj more then once for using it, im so use to going for the pin. Its ok though the guys i had it on didnt escape and take my back but the instructor was right. "You cant finish from there, you cant transition from there.. your just givivng your back if he escapes"
     
  8. stephensharp

    stephensharp Brown Belt

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    Same experience here. I started in a BJJ & Judo club that was primarily self-defense based. When I moved, I was taking classes at a sport oriented Judo club, and had a bit of trouble adjusting to all the rules and the subs that were or weren't allowed, or were allowed in some positions but not others ("When is a neck crank not a neck crank? When it's a kesa without the arm.")

    I just moved again, and started BJJ and Vale Tudo training at The Lab, and spent my entire first no gi class with the instructor saying "Stop grabbing around his head! You're gonna lose him, and you're giving up your back!!"

    I can still work it into the "trap the arm into a sort of key lock with the crook of your leg" neck and shoulder crank in a gi, but the hold is absolutely worthless in no gi. I also found myself in position for some subs, but hesitated as I went "Wait! That's not legal!" then realized I was in BJJ. I got a whole year of bad habits from Judo to get rid of.

    That's the biggest issue you'll deal with, and it will only effect you depending on your focus. If you do Judo competition, you'll find that you're not as fluid because you keep coming out of "the zone" as you go "Shit, that's right, I can't do that here... No! Can't do that..."

    Then, once you get yourself used to that, you'll have to deprogram all those rules and limitations so you can have a fluid BJJ game.

    Train both, but just keep your focus in mind.
     
  9. apapen

    apapen Yellow Belt

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    In theory I agree that you should train both arts, but if you ever want to ecxell in one of the arts you need full comitment. I don
     
  10. Sauron

    Sauron Red Belt

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    This will only affect you if are experienced in bjj and new to judo or vice versa. Once you've been training both for a while it becomes insignificant and it's not hard to transition between the two sets of rules.

    Having said that i do both bjj and judo together and they complement each other very well, i like the more explosive judo workouts and then the calm calculated bjj strategy.
     
  11. Ude_Garami

    Ude_Garami Guest

    BTW, there are several submissions readily available from Kesa Gatame. I know at least 2 armbars that are pretty easy to do. I have submitted a few guys with just a very tight pin as well. If you lose the pin you should be able to to immediately transition to another, this is what Judo stresses once you have trained long enough. You also have a good opportunity to take you opponent's back first when they slip out of kesa.
     
  12. aaron_mag

    aaron_mag Purple Belt

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    I have a striker background (TKD with some kickboxing in the past). I'm taking Sambo now.

    My goals are probably different than yours (I have no desire to become a professional fighter). But I initially had the same attitude as you. I just wanted to learn enough to defend subs and escape. Just wanted some basic exposure to grappling so I had some knowledge of it.

    But once you go down that path you don't stop! I find it quite enjoyable and relaxing to roll in sparring now. So I wouldn't worry about the 'I'm becoming more and more of a grappler. I want to be a sprawl and brawl type!!!' I'd just go with the flow. Learn and enjoy. Don't stress to much about how you evolve.
     
  13. colinm

    colinm Brown Belt

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    id say the desire to be a sprawl and brawler is a little silly. not cause im a bjj nuthugger, just because you shouldnt aim to be 1 (or 2 in this case, i guess) dimensional. i guess the best example of a sprawl and brawler running into trouble would be chuck vs randy 1. it just goes to show that no matter how good you are at something you will always find someone better, and eventually someone will put you on your back. i mean, fuck, couture has been on his back and you see how foolish he looks there.
     
  14. Sherdog_Mutt

    Sherdog_Mutt Purple Belt

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    I don't understand why people are so obsessed with staying with one style of fighting: 1) Sprawl & Brawl; 2) ground and pound; and 3) submissions.

    Wouldn't it make more sense to become as well rounded as possible? So you would be comfortable doing more than one game? In fact, isn't this what MMA is all about?
     
  15. Timbaland

    Timbaland Black Belt

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    Crosstraining both of these arts are good. For stand up use the judo throws and on the ground use the bjj techniques. My groundwork (newaza) in judo class is easily better than almost all of my judo class (with the exception of 3 guys who are all bjj blue belts who are now crosstraining in judo) so I just work on positioning and sweeps in judo class when we do groundwork. This training has helped my bjj game too.

    I've noticed the judo throws are very useful in grappling matches. The break fall in judo is very important. I've seen guys who only train in bjj get tossed around and some of them got significant injuries (dislocated elbow, dislocated shoulder, etc.) because tehy didn't know how to fall right. Train in both styles.
     
  16. The Sickness

    The Sickness Ichizoku

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    I train both, as well as muay Thai. Get it all, life's too short...
     
  17. cottonzway

    cottonzway ....

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    Well if you think about it being a legit "sprawl and brawl" fighters takes a lot more then just being a striker. It isn't one dimensional at all. In order to "sprawl" you have to have other skills. This is why I am taking BJJ and Judo. I will probably even try to work with some college wrestlers as well on that aspect. Using Chuck as an example, he wins most of his fights on his feet. A big part of that is due to him being able to keep it there and if it goes there take it back to his feet. That comes with years of formal training. He was a college wrestler and is also a BJJ purple belt.

    I think you may have taken the term I used in the wrong way. I am putting the time in to learn all parts of the fight game, but I would like to keep fights on my feet. I think with my size, reach, and boxing background it is best suited for me. If It's on the ground though and I see an opening for a sub I'll take it. That's why I'm learning all of this stuff. :D
     
  18. phenomfan1529

    phenomfan1529 Brown Belt

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    I orignally wanted to do Judo but couldnt find a place that teaches it where i live, so im doing BJJ. But I have also been doing boxing for a while now.
     
  19. beatnick

    beatnick White Belt

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    Thats complete bullshit. Your instructor might suck and is talking about his own lamness.

    As l see the pindowns are often the keys for submissions. From kesa gatame (scarf hold) u should be able to to some armlocks or even go for an trianglechoke. So In scarf hold If applied right pressure on the lower ribs area it could just be enough for the opponent to tap.
     
  20. Dedicado

    Dedicado Machetero

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    Yo Cottonwayz! You can be a great fighter if you train all three. When the fight turns ugly and you are hurt or disoriented or desperate you will naturally fall back on your best tools, in your case:boxing, so don't worry that grappling will make you too "grappler like". You will play your game, and when you need to you will be able to counter the other guy's submission game because you know that part of the game too.
    Chuck is a great role model, I don't think he's a bad example at all. You're going about the right way IMO. Good luck, and good hunting!
     

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