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Is beginner Judo right for me?

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by sark9guy, Jun 3, 2014.

  1. Judo Thai Boxer <img src="http://www.mediafire.com/download/kjmldl

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    Neither was I, I used to struggle to do forward rolls before Judo and now I can do backward rolls and jump off my arms into standing among other things.

    Judo is perfect for what you want but you'll have to be careful for injuries that might set back your law enforcement career.

    Gradings differ between countries and governing bodies. In the UK it used to be if you beat a belt at a grading in competition and passed the theory then you got that belt. Now, you have to pass the theory (be able to perform a few set throws when asked and be able to translate some Japanese words). I believe you also have to enter at least one competition at your level for each belt once you get to green belt and your instructor isn't supposed to grade you until you're fighting at the required level.

    In the US, you can grade on knowledge or competitively. I'm not entirely sure how they do it but I know that if you grade competitively it's a lot quicker.

    As for getting the basics down, it really depends. A first dan in Judo is someone who has mastered the basics. But if you're meaning at what sort of level do you have a basic understanding of throws and be able to perform one or two in randori I'd say about green belt level.

    One thing I've just learned recently is that uchikomi bands (you can use therabands) really help you improve minor issues and overall improve your turn ins. I wish I'd known about them when I was just starting Judo. The only thing you need to be careful of is that you're not repeating bad habits so is suggest doing Judo for a bit and when you really nail a turn in ask your instructor to watch you and then you can start going home and practising it.

    Apologies for any typos, posting from my phone and won't be able to edit on dubs.
     
  2. Judo Thai Boxer <img src="http://www.mediafire.com/download/kjmldl

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    ^Oh and you can expect your green belt in around 2-3 years training up to two times a week.

    This might be a lot quicker for some, I got mine in two or three years but I didn't go to Judo nearly as often as I do now - I probably only averaged 1 session a week and it was off for school holidays.

    Since I came back from a few injuries I've only missed two sessions at my club in a year plus went round other local clubs and went from blue belt to brown belt and throwing around a few dan grades.

    The biggest problem in Judo is injuries, I've really thought I was improving then bam I'm out for a few months with a sprain or break.
     
  3. Regular Joe Orange Belt

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    On top of how often you train and how quickly you get it, grading / ranking depends on the judo association/federation that your club is affiliated with and how strictly or liberally your sensei applies their guidelines.

    US Judo Association:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Judo_Association#The_USJA_National_Rank_System

    US Judo Federation:
    http://www.usjf.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/Kodokan-Rank-Requirements.pdf
     
  4. Regular Joe Orange Belt

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    My sensei uses Judo Canada and Judo Ontario's guidelines but he's oldschool and very experienced so it's essentially understood by the Judo community that he's allowed to apply unwritten rules from bygone days that aren't documented anywhere in Judo Canada / Judo Ontario guidelines but that all senior senseis / instructors / coaches and committee members recognize, like fast-tracking someone to a yellow belt if they can obviously demonstrate that they get the basics (especially guys coming from JJJ and BJJ), or fast-tracking competitors who score a lot of tournament wins at their level or above.
     
  5. Joe Dwarf Blue Belt

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    Regular Joe, Judo Canada publishes those guidelines but they don't oversee kyu gradings. Nobody is questioning the individual dojo as to how they conduct their kyu exams.

    OP, just go do judo. My advice is to enter the recreational program if your local club has one. Injuries really shouldn't be an issue for you in the early days of your practice. If you decide you want a heavy competition focus then it may become a concern. But for your main goals of getting in shape and having fun, competition isn't required.

    As far as promotion goes, most of the lower ranks in most organizations are just skill tests.
     
  6. sark9guy White Belt

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    Thanks folks. I looked at USJA, whom I believe the dojo I may go to uses. I see they talk about a time frame and points for advancement. What are the points? Do you earn a "point" for each competition your involved in?

    ~ Thanks ~
     
  7. Regular Joe Orange Belt

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    Don't worry too much about the points. All associations and federations have these types of guidelines but my understanding was that they were just guidelines. I was able to progress from white to yellow without every having a discussion of points. The important thing is just to get in the dojo and start training. Everything else will come together after that.
     
  8. Joe Dwarf Blue Belt

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    In Canada points are only for dan. A quick google shows that USJA requires points for kyu as well, but the values are so low for the first few kyu they are probably easily acquired through regular class attendance.
     
  9. sark9guy White Belt

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    I agree, beginning the training is most important.
     
  10. sark9guy White Belt

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    I seen they are higher for dan rankings (as to be expected). I was curious how they were obtained during the initial stages, where one isn't skilled for competition yet. That's what prompted my question.
     
  11. SocraticMethod Kingmaker

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    This is pretty much the exact thread I came here to post. I am thinking about starting to train judo at 34. I have a very little bit of experience in (mostly no gi) BJJ, but have never trained judo. I do have some concern over the physical toll on my body as opposed to BJJ, though, as I'm already a bit banged up. But there is a gym offering judo that is very convenient for me in both location and time, and I'm intrigued. Frankly, I'm just not sure my body can handle it at this point.
     
  12. sark9guy White Belt

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    I have the same concerns at 31, with several past injuries to my neck and lower back. I still think I am going to give it a shot, and see how I feel as I go.
     
  13. sark9guy White Belt

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    FYI: In the spirit of Martial Arts, I have had amazing progress in healing several of my issues with Acupuncture.
     

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