I feel like I am not getting any better

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by Libersolis****, Mar 24, 2008.

  1. Libersolis****

    Libersolis**** Orange Belt

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    I have been training since about July usually going 2 to 3 times a week. I am not he most athletic person in the world, but I am humble and try to listen and work on things. However at this point I feel like I am not getting it. I am constantly seeing guys come into the class and surpass me within a month or so, and this seems to happen with just about everyone knew that comes in. I don't have a problem with this, as I am glad when anyone improves, but it can be somewhat discouraging feeling like I am being left in the dust. Maybe everything will just click for me at some point and I will start improving, but right now I just feel like the guy everyone in the class likes to roll with because they can finish me off quickly.

    I am open to any suggestions you have, be they ones that focus on improving my mental outlook or physical game. Thank you in advance.
     
  2. codemonkey76

    codemonkey76 Black Belt

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    Just stick with it. Learning jiu-jitsu goes in fits and starts, you will feel like you are going backwards sometimes and then all of a sudden something clicks and that part of your game starts working, then you will roll with someone who will make you feel like you are back at square 1 again...

    Make sure any technique you learn in class you try in rolling that day. When someone beats you ask what you did wrong, how they got you with whatever they got you with.

    Get one of the higher belts to "take you under their wing" let them try their new moves on you always be willing to be a training dummy, they will help you out in return.

    Pick a move and try to go for it over and over and over again, eventually you will get it and get better at it, if you can't get it, get some help from the instructor on why you can't get it.
     
  3. Libersolis****

    Libersolis**** Orange Belt

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    Thanks, that is great advice. Part of my problem is that I am a very slow visual learner. It seems that quite often in class I am still working on getting the steps of a move down by the time it is ready to move on. I like to take things VERY slowly and I think the pace can get a bit fast for me, so I actually don't wind up learning very much.
     
  4. IChinaManI

    IChinaManI Green Belt

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    Its all about slumps and runs man. No it's not some weird cycle of constipation and diarhea. Alot of times you'll be doing well, improving every night and be winning in tournies. Other times you'll fall in a slump where nothing you do is right, your technique is off, you get smoked in training and competitions are there just for you to lose. They'll always be this cycle, and the key is to just not quit and keep going. Even if you are sucking ass for a month, when you get out of that slump, everything comes together, and all that technique will be in your muscle memory, and subconscious mind.
     
  5. andrewbc

    andrewbc Purple Belt

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    i find that in both disciplines i train in i have slumps and runs as chinaman said.. stick with it and do your homework. by that i mean practice with a friend, watch training vids, etc
     
  6. Mohawk79

    Mohawk79 Orange Belt

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    Just be patient. Everyone hits plateaus every once in a while, you're not alone when feeling this way. I felt like that for a long time, and just now I'm starting to see good improvements in my game.
     
  7. EndoG

    EndoG Blue Belt

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    If you're having trouble picking up techniques at the pace they're introduced then I would imagine vids could help you a lot.
    Methodically go through techniques/postures in different positions till you're at least intellectually comfortable with them. Then work on details and proper implementation in class when they're taught and when you're rolling.
    Vids helped me a lot I think, partly just because everything wasn't/isn't totally new when I learn it.
     
  8. Graunie

    Graunie Blue Belt

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    Have you tried keeping a technique journal? It may help you methodically walk through the techniques in your head.
     
  9. FistInFace

    FistInFace Brown Belt

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    This is huge.

    I've recently started getting really hands-on with two blue-belts before and after class, just troubleshooting shit, and its a huge improvement.

    It'd be nice if schools implemented a buddy or disciple system where a few whites are assigned to blues for advice. Kind of like Professors in college have TA's.
     
  10. 2om30

    2om30 Red Belt

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    paek.. than you plateau.. than you peak again... than you plateau.. for like 2 years... than you peak..

    of course that's my personal journal.. but it comes with the game.. just work at it.. don't leave like i did... LOL!
     
  11. Libersolis****

    Libersolis**** Orange Belt

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    There are predominantly white belts where I train, and many of them are super competitive guys who, at this point at least, are only interested in how quickly and easily they can sub me. I really have no problem with this as that is why they are there, but it would be nice to be able to roll with some people open to helping me out every once in a while :p
     
  12. masteringtheRG

    masteringtheRG White Belt

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    watch maaaaad footage. you'll start understanding flows and the mechanics of more and more techniques. eventually during a live fight you'll be calling out the next move
     
  13. FistInFace

    FistInFace Brown Belt

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    Dude this is not the outlook you should have.

    Trust me it may feel like everyone is out to get you (and some people might not give a shit if you learn) but you will find others that are more then willing to help you; all you have to do is ask.

    The squeaky wheel gets the oil. At any BJJ school that is halfway credible, if you ask for advice you will get it.
     
  14. jay_99z

    jay_99z White Belt

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    How is the gym about coming in early or staying late to train? Putting in the extra time will help a ton.

    For example.....I started training MMA in December. I have a good wrestling background (10 years) but very little stand up. That's definitely my weak point. Most of the guys at my gym are the oposite.

    So 1 or 2 times a week I come in an hour and half early. I help guys with takedowns and takedown defense and they help me with stand up. We both win.

    The key is finding a good training partner that is willing to help you out. If you get someone that is serious about it, they will jump at the chance to get some extra workouts.
     
  15. MonkeyNuts!

    MonkeyNuts! Rear Naked Poker

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    I was going to suggest this as well. A training log is a useful tool, not only to jot notes down so you don't forget, but it also gets you thinking about fine details. The point isn't so much to catalog everything they teach you and master everything, but to just have a reference when you want to practice some things while getting your mind geared in analytical mode for when they break down techniques in class.

    I also like to write down my thoughts on what I need to work on from rolling, and the next time I go to class I take a quick look at what I wrote in the previous few classes and see what I have to work on.
     
  16. codemonkey76

    codemonkey76 Black Belt

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    a technique journal as other have suggested is a great idea. Also don't worry about the finer details of the move you learnt, as long as you get it sort of right, then as you get better and learn more and more you will add in extra details, it will start out as a 5% move, then as you add detail after detail it will get more and more higher percentage.
     
  17. Sean-Roberts

    Sean-Roberts Blue Belt

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    Best Advice i got is to start taking private lessons. or if you really have to and your ok with this you might want to start thinking about trying out a different school.
     
  18. yodaman

    yodaman Brown Belt

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    It happens a lot. People hit humps. The important thing is to keep going, examine what you're learning, and try to implement it.
     
  19. slideyfoot

    slideyfoot Artemis BJJ Co-Founder

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    Only person you should be measuring your progress against is you. Other people may train more often, have athletic ability, previous experience etc - although its natural to think "damn, that guy started same time as me, I should be as good", think instead "could the me of today beat the me of last month?"

    Focus on a small number of techniques and concentrate on just working those in sparring. It may even just be that you steadily work one tiny part of a particular technique - perhaps where you want your hands to be at a certain point - but that all contributes to eventually getting the technique right, and in turn means you're being constructive and have a clear goal to work towards.

    I also find a technique-focused method of training helps with motivation, as its a useful way of ignoring ego: you're not thinking about 'winning' or 'losing', just making technical improvements. Totally meaningless if you get tapped along the way.

    Following on from that, I'd also strongly recommend keeping a training log. Personally, I've found doing so has been of massive benefit to my training: to copy what I wrote somewhere else, for a start it makes it easier to remember technique. The process of putting what you've just learned into words means you have to carefully think about exactly what you did in class. Even if your memory of it isn't that great, that will still mean you know specifically which parts you're unsure about, so can then ask your instructor next time you train.

    That also helps with recollecting terminology, which I find can be a big problem in BJJ. Of course, that normally means you only learn the terminology used in your particular school, but still of benefit. Ideally, I'd like to be able to learn the most common terms used globally, as well as just in my school: it then becomes easier to search places like the net for hints and tips on specific techniques.

    In addition to remembering technique, writing notes also means you can track your own progress, and identify what you feel you need to work on. As with writing up techniques, that then means you can concentrate on what went 'wrong', for want of a better word, asking your instructor and training partners how you could improve. So in effect, your notes become an action plan for the next sparring session.

    Also, read this fantastic thread, if you haven't already.
     
  20. Gsoares2***

    Gsoares2*** Banned Banned

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    Just need more Mat time -

    Keeping a journal can assist as well - but the thing that makes my game jump the most is technical training.

    Find someone you can meet up with on off times (away from the general class). Spend time working on isolated games. Such as a sequence of armlocks, then if they defend that armlock do this, then if they defend that do this.

    Spend at least 2 hours a week doing solely this position. Use the techniques in sparing so that you can run into problems your having and then address them in your "technique only" sessions.

    It will benefit you immensely, and allow you to get a better understanding of some of the simple details you can miss in the complications of a regular class. Don
     

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