i also asked the grapplers this

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by hockeyfacekilla**, Dec 14, 2005.

  1. hockeyfacekilla**

    hockeyfacekilla** Banned Banned

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    if one were to hit the carotid artery, to make one pass out, where (closer to the chin or the lower neck) should one hit? how should one hit? forearm? chop? punch? both sides or just one? how long will one pass out? is it dangerous? how hard does one need to hit? Thank you and please hurry! lol
     
  2. pistachio22

    pistachio22 Yellow Belt

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    I'm not sure but i think it would be pretty dangerous, since it's a main artery to the brain. Don't Know how hard you'd need to hit it, but you could cause haemorrhaging. Generally though i think you'd need to apply pressure, for at least 3 secs to cause unconsciousness. A blow would more likely stun.
     
  3. ballie

    ballie White Belt

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    the carotis artery can be struck but I think you won't really make someone pass out, the point is that you must close it long enough so the brain misses blood, if you just strike it there won't be a big shortage, best place to close it is at the 6th cervical(neck) vertebra, there is a thick tubercle(point) at the side against wich the used to press it in the middle ages before they cut them open :D they didn't know narcotics except maybe booze :wink:
    but I think it doesn't matter where, a good rnc sunk deep will do the work or just place your fist on it, that works well, put one arm around the neck and push at the other side your fist into the carotis..

    but why the question :icon_twis
     
  4. ballie

    ballie White Belt

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    by the way he passes out according to the lengh of the shortage ofcourse so if you only press for 4sec, it will be very short, but if you press for maybe 10s you could really pass him out, but that's dangerous shit, don't try out those limits... not so long ago I noticed how fast I choked someone out, I knew it was 4 sec or so to choke someone out if it's well sunk, but damn, it wasn't even well sunk
     
  5. aries

    aries Silver Belt

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    The effect you are talking of is caused by the pressure on the carotid sinus. Its the sudden impact on this structure which causes the 'victim' to lose consciousness not the trauma to the carotid artery.
    The carotid sinus helps to control blood pressure. The nerves act as pressure sensors to prevent high blood pressure to the brain. As a result the heart rate slows and the blood pressure is lowered rapidly. But because the high blood pressure was only transient due to the strike the sudden drop in BP results in unconsciousness due to lack of blood to the brain.
    Of course striking this area can damage the artery but that's not why you get the KO.

    They are located on either side just under the sternocleidomastoid muscles that run up the side of the neck just under the rear point of your jaw. Best way to hit it is with a knife hand strike, hence the mythical James Bond Judo Chop!

    Incidentally people often have one side which is more sensitive than the other. So if you do get to try it out on someone it may well work better on one side.
     
  6. monkey roll

    monkey roll Green Belt

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    "Judo Chop!"
    -Austin Powers

    -007

    -me.....
     
  7. Tom Hishon

    Tom Hishon Banned Banned

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    There lights come back on in about 20-50 seconds depending on size, shape etc. And a hammer fist works everytime. FUck the knife hand. Trust me dude, this is my money shot. If you can get a handful of hair and cock the guys head to the side, then drop the hammer fist on the other side, Lights Out. You shouldn't be playing around with it, seriously. It is some funny shit to watch but you can hurt someone.
     
  8. Cameron

    Cameron Green Belt

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    ok is it just me or is strikes to the throat illegal? and if not i say thats a little dangerous no? still i would say if your going to hammer fist or even an elbo if you can get in the clinch that would f*ck some one up.
     
  9. aries

    aries Silver Belt

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    The strike is on the side of the neck under the angle of the jaw. You are more likely to hit the throat throwing a punch to their chin.
     
  10. Marvin Covar

    Marvin Covar Amateur Fighter

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    punching to the throat is fun... getting hit by a punch to the throat, not so fun.
     
  11. beatin'stick

    beatin'stick Blue Belt

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    Aries is correct, except that you must also mention that the sternocleomastoid muscles lie over the transverse processes of the crevical vertebra, and so you have to hit from a little forward, or hit very hard to get past the padding of the muscles. Also there are nerve plexi at each intervertebral space, and hitting those hurts and can knock a guy out.

    There are actually four carotid arteries in the neck, they arise from two just above the collarbones, and the vasculature of the skull is arranged so that any two could be shut off, and you would be fine. A good choke not only impedes blood to the head, but also cuts off the jugular veins which prevent blood from leaving. Since arteries are under much higher pressure than veins, the intercranial pressure increases and that is one of the primary reasons for black-out.
     
  12. beatin'stick

    beatin'stick Blue Belt

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    I've found this area to be pretty well protected by the shoulder and skull, but it does really knock you loopy to get hit there very hard.
     
  13. OpethDrums

    OpethDrums Banned Banned

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    the touchless knockout only works about 40% of the time and doesn't work well on trained athletes who can decode the energy. there's a video floating around with some tips. it has stephan bonner in it
     
  14. stang

    stang Guest

    A couple of good points are made here. There are 2 main common carotid arteries off which arise an internal and external branch. The external branches supply superficial structures to the head and neck region and are essentailly worthless if your goal is to cause someone to "pass out." The internal carotids run a bit deep after they branch off the common and would be pretty hard to strike. Someone brought up the carotid sinus earlier. It is located right where the branchpoint of the common carotid is just deep to the sternocleidomastiod muscle on either side.

    Theoretically I suppose you could cause someone to pass out by striking right there, but it doesnt seem practical. On a sidenote what happens is when you massage the carotid sinus a reflex reaction occurs that basically stops the heart from beating or slows it down, at least for a brief moment to the point of passing out. It's actually called a vagal maneuver, and is commonly performed in emergency rooms in the setting of an abnormal heart rhythm.

    Now to actually cause someone to "pass out" from a strike to either carotid would be very unlikely. The reason it occurs in a choke is that both common carotid arteries are transiently occluded, causing blood flow to the brain to be either temporarily slowed or ceased altogether and hence someone passes out.

    I know thats a long answer but hope it helps.
     

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