How you got taught to jab

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by jm0b, Aug 4, 2015.

  1. jm0b

    jm0b Puncher of Holes

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    Was trained by successful ammie fighters.

    In bullet points:

    - Mimic your front hand going forward with a small step/slide forward to generate momentum, big toe digging into the ground and heel off ground
    - Shoulder up, head offline but do not flare your elbow while extending and twisting the wrist
    - Snap it out and back to your temple as quickly as possible, it's designed to obstruct not hurt

    Those were the basics that were taught to everyone who walked in through the front door. This was delivered in Ireland.

    What were you guys taught?

    Peace
     
  2. Young Turkey

    Young Turkey Green Belt

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    This is most common/generic/basic jab that is usually taught to beginners.

    There are a few variations
     
  3. fluffball

    fluffball Brown Belt

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    I think sinister has a thread explaining all the jab variations.

    I'm sort of a fan of not doing anything but the classic techniques. Some people want to box like Sugar Ray Leonard or Mayweather or whatever because they look cool, and try to mimic those techniques to complete disaster.

    Variations should come from your own personal style and you can reference what the greats have done. In my literally humble opinion.

    Edit: And to clarify I do see the confusion/irony when I say "classic" techniques, considering all the crazy variations in stances and punches from hundreds of years of boxing. I think people get the basic idea though.

    Edit 2: Further clarification, what I mean is you don't teach someone to box with their hands at their waist because Prince Naseem was successful doing that. This forum always flips out when people preach "keep your hands up", but you have to start with them up. Eventually through discovering yourself, you may figure out you can be more effective with them down sometimes, to better set up a counter etc. This is how all punch variations should come into play IMO. I throw a pretty nice left hook while simultaneously pivoting, which is how exactly zero trainers would suggest doing it.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2015
  4. Uchi Mata

    Uchi Mata Preaching the gospel of heel hooks and left kicks

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    That's pretty much how I learned. Though nobody ever told me it wasn't supposed to hurt, that just seems dumb. Of course it's supposed to hurt. Especially with small gloves, a well connected jab can floor people easily.
     
  5. jm0b

    jm0b Puncher of Holes

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    Was always told to use it to distract so the next punch can hurt more :)

    Walking onto a stiff jab can flash you easily though I agree.
     
  6. jm0b

    jm0b Puncher of Holes

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    Isn't that a pretty common technique, especially when used as a check?
     
  7. Sinister

    Sinister Doctor of Doom Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    I won't go into huge detail for the millionth time on jabbing, but I will say that what you do with your legs is just as/if not more import than what you do with your hand.

    In other words, unless you are advanced, throwing a jab that ends you up with your legs straight, weight too far forward, back foot off the ground, way off to one side, or any other such things that would be considered out of position and do not lend to the ability to throw a hard follow-up punch is a pretty bad idea. Once an opponent can time or defend it, it's of no use to you.
     
  8. KillerElite

    KillerElite Carlos Condit knees people in the face

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    I was taught wing chun style jabs (faster but not harder jabs) I prefer these over the standard jab.
     
  9. fluffball

    fluffball Brown Belt

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    Normally you shouldn't have your feet off the ground when throwing a punch. It's usually taught as 'throw the hook and use the torque to pivot' or 'pivot defensively then offense with hook'. What I do is punch AS my back leg spins around behind me, which sounds ridiculous but it works for me. I showed it to a coach one day (undeafeted pro boxer) and he's like "dunno how but that works for you, keep doing it."

    It's those oddities that make people have really bizarre styles that work for them. Most pro boxers have a lot of things they do really weirdly/downright wrong, so you really can't copy someone else's style. That's why I like teaching "classic" technique.
     
  10. Fire of Youth

    Fire of Youth Green Belt

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    I remember back to my very first lesson. My instructor asked me if I knew how to punch. I looked at him confused and said "yes". He immediately said "No you don't" and he was right.

    Over the years I have come to realise that the best way to teach straight punches is to get them pushing first (e.g. a heavy bag). They naturally use their body in a way more conducive to balanced force. You can then clean the small things up (e.g. flaring elbows, front knee) whilst they can feel the effect of their forceful push. After that you just get them to snap it in faster with synchrony. Also, less likely to get those wrist injuries that we all got when we first started out.
     
  11. thugpoet

    thugpoet Purple Belt

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    You don't have to start with your hands up, you don't have to start with one style or this style.

    Learn what your coach teaches
     
  12. MuayThaiDude

    MuayThaiDude Yellow Belt

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    I studied Wing Chun briefly, enough to learn the sil lim tao form, bok sao, fok sao etc. I remember the straight punch vertical hitting with the last three knuckles in an upward motion. I think it's a good punch in rapid succession, but (and as Bruce himself said) it is a not a system without flaws, of course nothing is.

    I do suggest that every Muay Thai fighter learn a little bit of Wing Chun trapping I think it's useful in tying up hands and getting a good position in the clinch.

    As far as the jab. How you were taught seems like textbook, which is good. For traditional martial arts I was tight form a horse stance, which is kind of moot. So it took some adjustment to put my shoulder into it. Newbie mistakes tend to be dropping the elbow first then striking, pushing not snapping, and not returning quickly enough to block your face. I find jabbing and then a slight elevation drop (using knees) or tilt helps to ward off the opponent's return punch. Throwing a stiff, sticking (arm stays extended) jab to cover their face and block their sight, then following with a cross is nice too.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2015
  13. a guy

    a guy Black Belt

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    The way I was taught to jab involved more of what not to do than what to do. My coach emphasizes getting into a good stance and just sticking your lead arm out while pushing off the back foot, with a little bend of the lower body. What he doesn't want is leaning forward, cocking the arm, standing straight up, pivoting the lead foot in, flaring either elbow, overcommitting, or generally doing anything too dramatic. I've learned that jabs are very simple to throw but very easy to screw up.
     
  14. Sinister

    Sinister Doctor of Doom Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    Problem with this statement is it assumes that because a Coach teaches it, then it is correct and efficient by default. Coaches are not infalable.
     
  15. KillerElite

    KillerElite Carlos Condit knees people in the face

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    I used them because I was 5'10 and only had a 74 inch reach. I competed in the middleweight and it was the way I got inside and or exited the clinch. I am a southpaw and I was taught with a kind of boxer/muay thai stance.
     
  16. jm0b

    jm0b Puncher of Holes

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    Thanks for the replies everyone. There was an ulterior motive to this thread; I moved to a new area in the UK and started training at the local gym. Just individual stuff going through bags and circuits by myself mainly.

    Basically the members are getting taught all wrong and after 3 months of doing my own work I offered a guy a few pointers after he hurt his hand for the umpteenth time throwing stupidly aggressive flaring jabs; the coach overheard and went berserk. I walked out with my hands up with him challenging me to a sparring match lol. None of the people in the gym are fighters and I found out the ones that have in the past got walked over badly. His gym isn't allowed any fighters anymore.

    The dude's been harassing me on FB for the last couple weeks so I've been linking him proper boxing coaching materials (including Sinister's breakdown) and he's stopped replying. Idiot. I was gonna link him this but he'd only create an account and bring negative traffic to the site so maybe I won't.

    It's *interesting to hear how people first learn things so if you've all got experiences good and bad while getting taught the fundamentals please chip in :)
     

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