How to stop or Counter the berimbelo effectively

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by ITRDC5, Nov 5, 2020.

  1. ITRDC5 Orange Belt

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    Hi Guys,

    So since I'm not training at all over here(UK) I've taken steps to look at how to improve some of my flaws. At a recent competition I was beaten pretty badly by an experienced bolo practictioner( 16-0).
    Its a bit of a hole in my game and I need to plug it.

    I know that I should be blocking the knee at DLR ( Leondro Lo style)to stop the inversion and that has helped before in the past, however this chap pulled on my collar and got me stepping first which through me off. The rest of the match was a bit of a blur and he managed to bolo me a few times.

    In addition to this there are at least two guys in my regular divisions that are decent with the bolo/crab ride style of guard/Sweeps- Purple belt super featherweight.

    No one at my gym has this style so I must look to the internets! :)
    I have seen Keenens video on shutting down the bolo and it seems to have some decent ideas.
    Any ideas or input welcome.


    Thank you
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2020
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  2. Whitebeltatlife Yellow Belt

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    I spar often against a guy who spams them and he's ridiculously good. There's a few things you can do, first is roll with them and try to roll back into the original position. Second is to try and reverse it, quite risky against good guys but grab his hips and try to dominate them mid-bolo. Third is a bit of a hail mary but you can grab the ankle and go for a footlock. Sadly at purple you can't snatch the leg for a kneebar.

    But the best of them all is to face him at all times, easier said than done. One thing I noticed was switching my stance. Say I'm passing in combat base, as I'm right sided, my right leg would always be up which he'd attack. I started switching my stance and his entries diminished. Like all things in BJJ though if they're so much better than you at something though it's very difficult to stop.
     
  3. GordoBarraBJJ Titanium Belt

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    Proactive - don't let him get the position - the hook, ankle control, and the angle to spin under).

    Turn your knee out (the side that he has the ankle trapped).
    Control the opposite leg (the none DLR hook leg)
    Pull back and sit on your opposite leg (create space) and make a fist and post it right by his head so he cannot spin under.

    If you're quick invite the DLR hook, turn your knee out, drop level a bit, control the opposite leg, upper body control with the other hand (either the a high High Grip or hugging around his back and latching on to his opposite lat), then Long Step Pass.

    Once they get the angle to spin under it is pretty much game over for you (in that situation).
     
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  4. rmongler Black Belt

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  5. ITRDC5 Orange Belt

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    Apologies Mongler just got around to watching that video.

    From the looks of things patience plays a bit part in passing a good inverter/berimbolo player.

    Noticed that Bruno never lets go of the opposite leg untill he attempted to pass.

    Still a bit unsure of the end sequence- why did he feel comfortable to let go of that leg? Because he had back control of the Gi?
     
  6. rmongler Black Belt

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    The desired target state for the attack is getting the opponent's legs crossed, his knees crossed past each other. This creates a structure that closes attacks by him on you, and opens attacks by you on him, like a key fitting through a lock. It's a procedure you see at work in many different passing situations.

    So he's pinned the DLR hook to the ground with his knee, he has a collar grip with one hand, and a pant grip on the free leg with the other, and he backsteps, pulling the free leg with him. This crosses the free leg over his DLR hook. Bruno then steps back over into the slot, putting himself in the leg weave, or near leg back turk, which he then uses as a leg ride entry to attack the back.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2020
  7. RJ Green Black Belt

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    oil check
     
  8. Daz2300 Orange Belt

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    I've been using this counter successfully for about 5 years, rather than the leg drag i usually end it with a footlock on their right leg.

     
  9. Os3y3ris Purple Belt

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    Have you tried the berimbolo?
     
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  10. ITRDC5 Orange Belt

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    I've never been drawn towards doing it due to not being that flexible/ comfortable being over my neck.
    I play more seated guard than anything
     
  11. Os3y3ris Purple Belt

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    Not according to this thread you don't. You play berimbolo and you lose. Its s 50/50 joint and you gotta play it immediately as it hits the field. In taekwondo they call that sametiming attack. When you throw back theres the back, or you can lock the arms.
     

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