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Hand Timing

theTKDman

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Just took a Muay Thai class. Ive been at it for about a month now and Im doing pretty good. Ive trained on my own for a long time and in taekwon-do for a long time. What I noticed that I lack is timing when it comes to throwing hand combos and parying and slipping. What is the best way to train this besides just sparring?
 
theTKDman said:
Just took a Muay Thai class. Ive been at it for about a month now and Im doing pretty good. Ive trained on my own for a long time and in taekwon-do for a long time. What I noticed that I lack is timing when it comes to throwing hand combos and parying and slipping. What is the best way to train this besides just sparring?
What do you mean by lack timing?
 
One on one instruction with focus mitts..Set up a one on one session with your instrcutor..do focus mitt training and some Thai pad stuff in there
 
What I mean by timing is knowing how to "break" their timing so that you can make your attack as effective as possible. I always attack at the wrong time and get caught when I step in. I get caught with power techniques too like left hooks when I lead with my jab. Even when I try to set up my combos with an inside leg kick I get caught with it. How can I set my combos up nicely?
 
Did you even read my post? I said that when I jab I get caught with a left hook or the step left and dose me a jab of their own. I like to think Im fairly fast but I cant seem to land it or any of the following punches before being barraged by their own. Help a guy out please.
 
Well, practicing on focus mitts and such will help. But you have to take into account your opponent's tendencies as well. If, as you mentioned, he likes to step left and jab you back when you try a jab, use that to your advantage. Throw a jab and try a mid roundhouse kick while your opponent is stepping and jabbing since you're expecting it. Also, if you're getting tagged with a hook while jabbing, you're not keeping your guard up when punching. You can't just know combinations and expect them to work automatically. It's all in how you set your opponents up. It requires some thinking.
 
Practice on the bag a lot if you can't get time with a trainer. Buy some focus mitts and have a buddy hold for you. Unless you have a willing trainer with some time on his hands to hold for you.
 
Thanks guys. Ill try the mid roundhouse. And Ill videotape myself sparring to keep an eye on what my guard is like. Appreciate the help and the quick responses.
 
One note about that mid roundhouse kick is that your body positioning is going to be a bit weird because as you jab, your opponent steps to his left, he'll be more towards your right. So if you throw just a straight roundhouse, it's not gonna have much impact because it won't have time to develop speed and strength from your hips. So there's two ways that you can make that kick effective.

(I'm assuming you're a right handed fighter in a left foot forward stance).

1) After your jab is extended, on its way back, take a small step forward with your lead foot (left foot). That will set up your momentum and give you extra "oomph" in your roundhouse impact. It's like the roundhouse that Bas Rutten advocates where you step out with your foot towards his outside. If you need more details, you can try doing a search on the forums for Bas Rutten's roundhouse kick. It was an interesting debate a while back.

2) Another way you can set up more power in that roundhouse kick is to take a quick, small shuffle step to your rear left as you jab. This is a bit difficult to explain, but I'll try. As you jab, your rear foot (right foot) moves behind and to the left of your lead foot (left foot). Since you did TKD, think of it as the step through sidekick. You know the one where your rear foot steps behind and crosses your lead foot and then you do a side kick with your lead foot? If not, watch the old Bruce Lee movies where he does his "power side kick." He learned that from TKD. Anyway, after your rear foot crosses your lead, the lead foot (left foot) takes a small step forward while pivoting towards your opponent. This will set you up better to throw that hard roundhouse. Because if you're sparring Muay Thai, tapping kicks ain't gonna do nothing. You have to throw it hard.

So I recommend you try these two leads into the roundhouse kick (if you choose to roundhouse him). But the second one is definitely hard to time and use. You need to pretty much step, pivot and kick perfectly in order for it to be effective.

Also, you mentioned that sometimes the guy hooks with his left. For that I would say try the same thing, but instead of kicking, throw a knee into his exposed rib since the distance will be closer if he's stepping in to throw a hook. The only thing you have to remember is to keep that guard up or you're gonna eat his fist while you're kneeing him. Try to block the hook with your right hand; grab his neck in an extended clinch with the left; and pull him towards you as you knee his exposed ribs.
 
Cover up like Winky Wright style. You will feel secure and will be able to see punches more clearly with more relaxed mind.
 
try moving laterally a bit, and don't always step in when you punch. counter punchers love it when you always step in the same way, then they time you. break your rhythm when you step, make some quick short steps, etc. don't just jump straight in. you have to be aggressive, but also if you are worried about getting tagged coming in, you need to be elusive. and when you do jab, commit to it, put your chin behind your jabbing shoulder, keep your right hand at your cheek. set up the hands with leg kicks, ie. lead low kick to inside of his lead leg then immediate jab/cross, committing to those punches.
 
Crimson Tiger said:
Cover up like Winky Wright style. You will feel secure and will be able to see punches more clearly with more relaxed mind.
awesome technician
 
theTKDman said:
Just took a Muay Thai class. Ive been at it for about a month now and Im doing pretty good. Ive trained on my own for a long time and in taekwon-do for a long time. What I noticed that I lack is timing when it comes to throwing hand combos and parying and slipping. What is the best way to train this besides just sparring?

Drill slips and counters. Take up boxing for a while to specialise on your hands as I guess that's a weak point for you being a TKD man.
 
Sounds like you have problems being picked off when you move in and countered even when you jab. Well the solution to the first is to use head movement, work off the jab to come in and don't come straight in, circle round and try and get a better angle on your opponent.

To not get countered with the hook when you jab well like already mentioned your right hand (assuming orthodox) should be up and protecting you. Take that hook on the glove and punish them with a lead uppercut, its a great counter to a lead hook.
But if you want to avoid the shot altogether learn how to feint. Feint the jab, draw the hook with a little shift of weight to your rear foot. The hook will miss and then counter with straight right to body or head.

Take or leave this one as in Muay Thai you at risk of taking a knee but if timed right its unlikely after a left hook. Feint and then duck and roll under the hook. Work the body or whatever as you are outside them now so have a great attacking position.
 
double end bag should be a staple of your training. most underused and important piece of training equipment. I hit mine daily and if I only have time to work out for five minutes, it is on that, keeps your timing razor sharp. You will be able to catch flies out of the air after you have mastered it. Good luck.
Also stop masturbating as it makes yougo blind.
 
Thanks for the great responses.... definately have some things to work on now.
 
theTKDman said:
What is the best way to train this besides just sparring?

You can do a maize-ball (aka slip ball) drill. BTW, I only suggest this b/c you said "besides just sparring." From my exp this drill wont' isn't as effective for muscle memory till you get profiecient doing it live.

and since you do MT, try boxing. MT sparing doesn't give you enough opportunities to practice slipping.
 
try runnign you combos and slip/fades witha double end or "headbag" it has helped my students learn timmeing and targeting
 
This may sound weird but you can try out wing chun kungfu or kali because they emphasize timing and stopping the enemy's motion. If not then try out some good speedbag drills.
 
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