Green Tea, Fat Oxidiation, and Insulin Sensitivity

MikeMartial

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Green tea extract ingestion, fat oxidation, and glucose tolerance in healthy humans.

Venables MC, Hulston CJ, Cox HR, Jeukendrup AE.
Human Performance Laboratory, School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
BACKGROUND: Green tea consumption is reportedly associated with various health-promoting properties. For example, it has been shown to promote fat oxidation in humans at rest and to prevent obesity and improve insulin sensitivity in mice. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the effects of acute ingestion of green tea extract (GTE) on glucose tolerance and fat oxidation during moderate-intensity exercise in humans. DESIGN: Two studies were performed, both with a counter-balanced crossover design. In study A, 12 healthy men performed a 30-min cycling exercise at 60% of maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2)max) before and after supplementation. In study B, 11 healthy men took an oral-glucose-tolerance test before and after supplementation. In the 24-h period before the experimental trials, participants ingested 3 capsules containing either GTE (total: 890 +/- 13 mg polyphenols and 366 +/- 5 mg EGCG) or a corn-flour placebo (total: 1729 +/- 22 mg). RESULTS: Average fat oxidation rates were 17% higher after ingestion of GTE than after ingestion of placebo (0.41 +/- 0.03 and 0.35 +/- 0.03 g/min, respectively; P < 0.05). Moreover, the contribution of fat oxidation to total energy expenditure was also significantly higher, by a similar percentage, after GTE supplementation. The insulin area under the curve decreased in both the GTE and placebo trials (3612 +/- 301 and 4280 +/- 309 muIU/dL . 120 min, respectively; P < 0.01), and there was a concomitant increase of 13% in insulin sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS: Acute GTE ingestion can increase fat oxidation during moderate-intensity exercise and can improve insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in healthy young men.
 
Wow, fancy links and colors.


Thanks for the post. Is there a way to know how much tea you would need to drink to get a similar amount of polyphenols? I'd prefer to drink it over pill form.
 
Wow, fancy links and colors.


Thanks for the post. Is there a way to know how much tea you would need to drink to get a similar amount of polyphenols? I'd prefer to drink it over pill form.

Somewhere, sometime, in a forum far, far away, someone posted the average amount of polyphenols per cup, made via steeping with a standard bag.

I honestly don't remember the number, but it's here somewhere.
 
Well I know what I'm doing for the rest of the evening.
 
How much extract did they take, i read through it and couldnt find it...if its there and i missed it then i am stupid...

I think i see it now...i am stupid.
 
890mg of polyphenols, which according to the other link is equivalent to ~4cups of brewed green tea.
 
890mg of polyphenols, which according to the other link is equivalent to ~4cups of brewed green tea.

Goddamn, who needs a preWO energy stack when you're drinking 4 cups of green tea? :icon_chee

That would have me wired out of my mind.
 
Green tea has been something I have drank for a long time. Lots of good benefits to it.
 
Thanks for the link and handy highlighted conclusion. I drink watered-down green tea during workouts and it's great. On a related note, here's a tidbit about having green tea with Vitamin C:

The study by Purdue University researchers, published in the November 2007 Molecular Nutrition and Food Research, involved putting green tea alone and with various additives through a model simulating gastric and small-intestinal digestion. They found that catechins are unstable in non-acidic environments such as the intestines and less than 20 percent of the total remains after digestion. But adding vitamin C (which is done in ready-to-drink products to increase shelf life) increased recovered levels of the two most abundant catechins by sixfold and 13-fold, respectively.

Adding citrus juice to plain green tea was also beneficial. The study found that lemon juice caused a roughly four-fold boost in the recovered levels of catechins; in order, the next most effective juice additions were orange, lime and grapefruit. And one should not be stingy with the juice - while adding 10 percent juice was helpful, the best catechin preservation happened at levels of 20 to 50 percent juice. This suggests that while adding a squeeze of lemon to tea is an excellent idea, it also makes sense to think in terms of 20 to 50 percent blends using orange and grapefruit juices.

From:

http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/ART02914/How-to-Boost-Green-Tea-Benefits.html
 
Not really related to how healthy green tea is, but green tea with some orange wedges is one of life's finest pleasures...=)
 
*hears name*

Green Tea is good. Drink green tea.
 
Word. I have been a fan of green and white tea for sometime and drink them often. I just ran out of my green tea pills...Gotta get some more. I would drink about 2 cups of green or white tea a day and pop about 2-6 pills a day as well.
 
Nice find Mike. I've been taking green tea extract everyday for the last couple months and can tell the difference.
 
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