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grappling priorities

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by spiderguardman, Oct 9, 2005.

  1. spiderguardman

    spiderguardman Double Yellow Card Double Yellow Card

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    at your school what do your trainers make you drill the most?
    at my club we have been doing almost only guard pass and sweep from guard drills for like 6months, sure we do other stuff to but 70% of all my trining conists of only sparring or drilling sweeps and passes, and now i really understand why cause my game has gone up like 200% in 6months, i used have preeety good subs and being good i'n the rolling (by rolling i meanrolling with sweeps and scrambles to end up in an good posititon,)
    but my sweeps and passes were preety bad, so now when i feel more comfortable on these points my entire game is better cause i feel comfortable almost everywhere, well the point of this story is that i think it's a very good way of training, sure you should do a lot of free sparring aswell, but situation training is very underrated in my opinion cause it's great.
     
  2. Wolverine

    Wolverine Green Belt

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    No complaints here.

    It is a must that you learn how to sweep. If you are good at submissions but horrible on your back then you will have much difficulities at tourneys. Not to mention in a real fight.

    Wolverine
    ///
     
  3. wenispinkle

    wenispinkle Skankin' It Easy...

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    my instructor puts alot of emphasis on the sit-up guard, because he fights mma too and doesnt like us to us a closed guard, because you can get pounded from in there. he also hates for us to stay in a closed guard. he teaches us to open it, then stand up and work a pass from there. i love passing like that, its so much easier. hes a good instructor
     
  4. hamoom

    hamoom Purple Belt

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    i cant really say he teaches a lot of one thing. he doesnt teach enough takedowns, thats for sure
     
  5. LCDforMe

    LCDforMe Purple Belt

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    I haven't been formally taught any takedowns yet at all. I worked with a college wrestler one day after class but that's it.
     
  6. hamoom

    hamoom Purple Belt

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    just train and spar standup 10 mins every day before the class is over. train with a wrestler or a judo guy. helps a lot to get the feel for it, and when you get taken down the thousandth time you start to understand when youre vulnerable. a lot of bjjers dont take the time to do this on their own and have no takedown game whatsoever. i relaly think they should have a seperate class for takedowns at bjj schools.
     
  7. RobT

    RobT Purple Belt

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    We don't train many takedowns at my school, but it's really due to the fact that the gym isn't big enough to do it with the number of people who are training. If the class is small for a session, that's usually when we'll work on takedowns.

    The main thing we work on are sweeps, and guard passes. Usually it's a series of techniques, working up to a submission. So we'll learn a sweep or guard pass, a slight variation, then a positional movement (side to full mount, rolling your opponent to his side from side mount, taking the back etc) and then finally a sub on the end of it. Sometimes we also get a reversal from one of the positions.
     
  8. TapSD

    TapSD Killer Bee....1%

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    The first day I learned take downs and actually learned leg locks..I guess because Im in an MMA school and not strictly BJJ where you dont learn leg locks forever..But we have collgeiate wrestlers come in to teach takedowns..a MT champ from Thailland who comes in too teach MT. I guess we should learn alot more basics but for MMA my school is awesome
     
  9. triso

    triso Green Belt

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    I must be lucky as hell. The first thing we do every class is train takedowns. We drill them as the first technique of the class after warm-ups. Then we usually drill the shit out of some ground techniques, whether it
     
  10. VampireMonk

    VampireMonk Black Belt

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    at my school I feel the underlying priority is mobility from the ground.

    I've never really done so much of this at any other school.
     
  11. Bubble Boy

    Bubble Boy Black Belt

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    Judo student, so:

    Typical class:

    2 hour class.
    Warmup.
    Uchikomi* drills till blue in the face.
    Maybe work a specific throw for a while, sometimes throwing into a crash pad but usually just on tatami.
    Groundwork drills.
    Sometimes work a specific submissions, pass, escape, etc, for a bit.
    Randori, equal amounts of ground work and standing.


    *Uchikomi: praticing a throw over and over rapidly with a partner, without actually throwing. You get just to the point of hefting your partner and then stop and repeat.
     
  12. Gsoares2***

    Gsoares2*** Banned Banned

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    They do its called judo :)
    i know what you mean though... even when we do train take downs its like 5-10 mins and we dont even throw them completely like we did in judo. We just do a couple uchi-komi's and then move on... One day our instructor told us to throw each other and i was so surpised so many of the blue belts didnt know how to fall correctly. They have been doing roll overs for years but do not understand the concept of the slap on the mat and what it actualy does. I remember a guy laughing at me because i slapped the matt so hard with my ukemi... same guy wasnt laughing when we practiced eponseonagi and he was eating shit and had no idea how to fall.. Was slapping the mat light, if at all, timing was all off. Seriously the instructor was pissed at all of them because their were so many guys doing it wrong.. Except for 2 other judo guys and my self.

    Break falls are not trained enough in bjj imop either.
     
  13. VampireMonk

    VampireMonk Black Belt

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    just cause your good on the ground doesn't guarantee that you know how to break fall.

    its a separate skill obviously
     
  14. Truculent

    Truculent Orange Belt

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    we work on being explosive, constantly moving; I mean we train to compete for Jiu Jitsu, but all of us have aspirations of future MMA careers. We're being taught how not to roll (stalling, keeping guard closed too extensively, basically shit that Americans would boo to.)
     

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