Getting the most out of instuctionals

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by Treadly, Aug 31, 2010.

  1. Treadly

    Treadly Guest

    Does anyone have any specific methods for learning from instructional videos?

    I've got a few downloaded and my current method is to watch and take notes, but I'm not sure if that is really effective.

    I find myself in positions while training and I can remember that I wrote notes down about this or that move, but can't ever remember quickly enough to pull it off.

    Also not sure if I should just be focussing on things of an immediate nature, i.e. researching mount escapes if I keep getting caught there, or if I should just try to progress through a full DVD (like the Maia series).

    Would like to know what other people do.

    Thanks,
     
  2. stile0

    stile0 Purple Belt

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2008
    Messages:
    1,763
    Likes Received:
    3
    I just like to pick one move and commit it to memory. After that I'll try and use it in class over and over until I'm comfortable with it. Then repeat the process. I don't see the point in trying to remember a whole DVD. It's the small details that make the difference.
     
  3. SentinelSix

    SentinelSix White Belt

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2009
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've filled out a a hundred or so pages of notes off of instructionals and what worked for me is just focus on a move or two to take detailed notes on. I drill the move on my yoga mat or bed a few times working off memory and refer back to the source or my notes if I get stuck. Then in class I usually try to pull off the move by getting in the proper position against lesser skilled opponent and working my way up.

    I tried to be a "collector" of moves at one point taking detailed notes on every single technique shown on a dvd but this never really worked since I never put in the effort to drill each technique and apply them in live sparring.

    Also refer back to your notes after a few days to see if they are understandable, always making adjustments. Right now I'm using pen and paper but plan on switching over to a word processor asap.
     
  4. lechien

    lechien Gold Belt

    Joined:
    May 9, 2007
    Messages:
    16,311
    Likes Received:
    1,376
    I see something I like then fo to the club and test it on friends before or after class a few times and then asked them to resist and for feedbacks. most of the time, a higher belt will be able to adjust and correct the techniques as well before I use it during rolling time.


    some instructors would frown up such behaviors.
     
  5. CAnklerank

    CAnklerank Yellow Belt

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2009
    Messages:
    187
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    On the Ponderosa, Dublin, Ireland
    I watch competition footage and if a see a move that might fit well into my current game i try to find it on an instructional/youtube. The last was the Xande sweep because i like to play from guard and use sweeps to set up my submissions. The current one is the Loop choke for when people pass my guard to half guard, it gives me a good sub opportunity that also enable me to get bakc to my favoured full guard if i dont get the sub.

    I have several instructionals but i dont think i've watched a full one. I do on ocassion (cough** during injury) take parts of instructional to watch ie Demian Maia Advanced Sweeps / Braulio Estima Lapel Collar Chokes (Inviible BJJ series) and if i see a move which would fit me well i would watch it a few times, takes notes and try to use it in open mat before live sparring.

    I'd be very interested to hear what the likes of CashBill, Oli Geddes and Hilary do, although i suspect they spend so much time on the mats that they have little time for instructional off it.
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2010
  6. Sloth

    Sloth Brown Belt

    Joined:
    May 13, 2008
    Messages:
    3,356
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Philadelphia, PA
    Focus on one or two moves, take good notes, bring notes to class to review before training. Drill the moves as much as possible, referring to your notes as needed. Make a point to try them in sparring. If you drill them, you are more likely to remember and be able to execute in sparring.
     
  7. Treadly

    Treadly Guest

    It seems like no one who has replied so far gets much out of DVD series. Apart from taking a few bits of info here and there but never really using all the information.

    With so many YouTube videos it's tricky to know which ones are worthwhile.

    I'm just looking for a ways to keep building info so I have a few different options to think through hen I'm in guard, mount, etc.
     
  8. GSparky

    GSparky Green Belt

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2008
    Messages:
    1,278
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Kansas City, MO
    Well mostly everyone that replied said to focus on only a few techniques. Why don't you take notes the first time that you watch the move taught, then drill the technique like 20 times. Then compare your notes after you've drilled the move & see if you need to update the notes. Only learn at max, 3 moves per day which to many would be to much but only focus on 1 position per week, meaning that if you have to, you'll have to drill some of the positions 2 times per week depending on your instructional.

    You can't just take notes, I have plenty of instructionals, I don't take notes or drill them but the most important thing is to remember the theories & philosphies of the move & then drill the move as much as possible. If you don't drill the move, you wont ever get it down.
     
  9. SuperSuperRambo

    SuperSuperRambo Senior Moderator Senior Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2004
    Messages:
    32,493
    Likes Received:
    562
    Location:
    NY
    Stop over-thinking it.
     
  10. Bathwater

    Bathwater Let me clean you with my love

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2006
    Messages:
    3,393
    Likes Received:
    250
    Location:
    The tub
    I usually go chapter by chapter. If I see something in the table of contents that really appeals to me then I'll skip to that one first. I'll watch from the beginning of the chapter and if a technique sticks out then I'll make a note of it. I usually stop watching after I find three or four that I really like (that's usually more than enough to overload my brain). From there re-watch each technique repeatedly (usually a few dozen times), utilizing slow motion and 5-10 sec loops. I make sure to pay close attention to head, hand, foot, hip, elbow, and knee positioning (for both guys). After that I drill and try to work the moves in sparring.

    I think it's also valuable to revisit stuff that may not have appealed to you in the past. Just because something didn't fit into you game 6 months ago doesn't mean it won't now.
     
  11. Lutador011

    Lutador011 Blue Belt

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2009
    Messages:
    784
    Likes Received:
    2
    I watch it TWICE
     
  12. BJJ in Chicago

    BJJ in Chicago Livin' la vida bomba

    Joined:
    May 27, 2006
    Messages:
    2,916
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Trying desperately to learn the berimbolo
    watched roy dean's purple belt requirements dvd sections on the back and mount.

    took notes (they're in my log here on sherdog)

    tried the stuff and focused on it for a week.

    watched it again.

    edited notes.

    took the info back to class.
     
  13. DevinTheDewd

    DevinTheDewd Orange Belt

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2009
    Messages:
    335
    Likes Received:
    1
    Learn 2-3 moves one week. Drill the move until you can't stand to do it anymore. Apply while rolling. Next week. drill previous weeks moves plus 3 more. turn your drilling into a flow drill.
     
  14. ZenMojo

    ZenMojo White Belt

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2009
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    0
    Instructionals can be great tool, but just watching and taking notes doesn't do much for you. It is just like somebody showing up for 3 months of classes twice a week and just watching from the side. At the end of those 3 months they hop on the mat and can't do anything.

    For new material, you need to pick one or two techniques and get one of your buddies to drill them with you (just like you would do in class). Go back and watch the video and continue drilling the technique(s), try it rolling with newer guys until you can add it too your arsenal on guys at your level. Rinse and repeat with a new selection of 1 or 2 techniques. It may take you 6 months or longer to work through all the techniques on a DVD (and there may be techniques on there that are just not for your game at your current level).

    You can target certain holes in your game by looking for specific instructionals that address your problem area. But the drilling and adding to your game part stays the same - you have to bring it to the mat for a lot of reps before you really "get it."

    Instructionals are also great for reviewing techniques you already know. It's like being able to ask your instructor "can we go over that cool kimura set-up to the half guard sweep?" in the comfort of your living room. And you can ask the question again and again and again without feeling like a complete nitwit.

    So in summary:
    Pick only one or two things to work on at a time.
    Take it to the mat and drill it.
    Introduce it to your rolling
    Rinse and repeat

    Just like what you have to do with techniques you are learning with your instructor. As a final point, if you find yourself watching instructionals when you could be at class or open mat - You're doing it wrong! :)

    Peace,
    Zen Mojo

    Get your grips, use your shoulder for pressure and whisper something dirty to the mat as you pass...
     
  15. MUFC

    MUFC Brown Belt

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2007
    Messages:
    2,719
    Likes Received:
    6
    I only do 1 technique at a time + techniques that are a direct consequence. As in, I won't watch any more.

    For example, in Cobrinha's set, he shows the Tomo Nage from DLR. He also showed the omoplata if they counter. I watched those two in one go, and decided to try them out.

    If I watch too many, it may not occur to me to work one of them.
     
  16. MMA junkie

    MMA junkie Purple Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2002
    Messages:
    1,732
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Irvine, CA
    I tend to watch them over and over. I watch more than one move to get the concepts but try to focus on one or two during sparring. It obviously helps when I can find a buddy to roll with an practice the move outside of class.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.