Fighting ambidextrous

Discussion in 'UFC Discussion' started by Fahcough, Feb 13, 2016.

  1. Fahcough

    Fahcough Black Belt

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    It can't be as tough learning to fight from both sides as ball sports. Much easier to train a punch/kick from either side than learning to throw a ball or swing a bat from weak arm. There are still fights where someone gets punished on their main stance and they won't switch or just look really uncomfortable when they do.

    Not 100% where this topic was headed, just random ADHD thoughts. So name some fighters that have excelled never having to switch over to survive because of their arsenal. Like Hendo's H-bomb
     
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  2. wilKO

    wilKO Green, White & Gold belt

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    Why would you imagine it's not as hard to fight in both stances as it is to throw a ball or swing a bat? It's massively tough because if it wasn't everyone would do it. As for the topic Hendo excels with his right hand but it does hold him back when he fights more diverse fighters. It's painful to watch him knowing he has one weapon and Machida and Vitor etc know it. Conor has excelled with his left hand so far.
     
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  3. RondaDrowsy

    RondaDrowsy Banned Banned

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    switching stances and throwing strikes from both isn't that hard, many fighters can do it, but there is no point if they're better from one stance.

    unless the game plan is to confuse the opponent by doing it non-stop..but I don't see it as that big of an advantage.


    Also, neurologically, people's more dominant hand is by far their most powerful. Hendo does not have that power in his left hand as he does in his right (in b4 wand left hook ko gif)
     
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  4. Sgt Smith

    Sgt Smith Bassed God

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    Pretty common in TMA, just takes some time to get proficient in. I think much of R/L dominance is a mental thing. You can learn to write with your non-dominant hand if you work hard enough. When you pick up a stringed instrument it's really your non-dominant hand that has to be more proficient. The same applies to striking if you're willing to put forth the effort.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2016
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  5. KB Warrior

    KB Warrior Brown Belt

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    Ronda doesn't switch stances
     
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  6. Fahcough

    Fahcough Black Belt

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    I guess from routine mechanics. You don't look near as goofy punching a bag from both sides as you do trying to throwing a ball or swinging a club.

    From watching some legs get brutalized and the fighter is limping on it but keeps it forward. He'll switch for 2 seconds, show the other side, then go right back. Seems like it would be worth training 2 looks so you have options. It's not like you're asking Aldo to learn English, just practice 50/50.
     
  7. NobodyNothing

    NobodyNothing Blue Belt

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    I think genetics plays a role in how easy it is to be ambidextrous. Speaking from experience, I am right handed. But I play hockey left and baseball / golf I'm equal either hand. I drive with my left. I dunno.
     
  8. FootstompShonie

    FootstompShonie Silver Belt

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    I think it suits itself more to guys who have kick-heavy striking games and more of a karate/taekwondo style. It allows you to attack from a bunch of different angles. But boxing where usually one hand is your "power" punch, guys should just stay with one stance IMO.

    When I wrestled I'd always stay with one foot forward but others like to switch it up, think it's more of a preference for grappling.
     
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  9. wilKO

    wilKO Green, White & Gold belt

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    Its not just striking from both stances. It's defending too. In ball sports it's the same motion you just swap sides. Nothing changes really. In fighting someone is coming to take your head off so it's tough to stay composed and remember the defensive aspect of it from the wrong stance.

    I think it's fair to say that if most boxers have a clear favourite stance and all they have to do is train boxing then it's only going to be even more of an issue in mma. They don't have the time to dedicate even 50% of what boxers do to striking so to find time to develop competent skills in another stance is never going to happen.
     
  10. Sgt Smith

    Sgt Smith Bassed God

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    Many fighters will revert back to what they are most comfortable with under stress. I'm sure plenty of them also do not spend the time training lead with both sides. I think it's great to have both options as it's positionally advantageous, but you have to stick with what works for you personally.
     
  11. kflo

    kflo Gold Belt

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    It takes a lot of training to have the same instincts from both sides. It's doable but it's not easy. It's not just offense but having the right reactions defensively. Fighting at a high level isn't easy. Learning to do it from both sides isn't that easy either obviously. You don't see many who can do it effectively. There's a reason.
     
  12. Jweed10

    Jweed10 White Belt

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    Anthony Pettis is really darn good as Orthodox and unorthodox
     
  13. Lamfadha

    Lamfadha Purple Belt

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    Karate is leaps and bounds ahead of everyone in this arena the training makes it so you get good at both stances.
    I have better kicks on my left leg but better punches on my right hand but my background makes it so I can switch stance and be effective from both.

    I think the boxing / muay thai method of training one side is flawed especially since if one side has natural power in your hand why not have your less dominant hand forward so your weaker hand has the added power of your hips shoulders and forward momentum to help develop it's power while having a deviously powerful/fluid forward hand? I only really see switch stances to attack from once then go back to "normal".
    I think the thing with boxing and kickboxing styles such as muay thai etc focus on one side for time constraints and trying to make you good the fastest way possible. I don't think it is the best way to train a fighter.
     
  14. waldywaldy

    waldywaldy lol motherfuckers

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    Reem is excellent from both stances
     
  15. jeff7b9

    jeff7b9 Red Belt

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    If you learn both sides from the start it is MUCH easier.

    As some TMAs teach both stances, it becomes natural (vs getting good one way and having zero practice from the opposite stance)

    To compare it to sports, 99.99% of baseball players never switch their throwing hand, hence they will look like an ass and be completely useless attempting to throw with their normal glove hand.

    However all GOOD lacrosse players can catch and throw with both sides (and any coach who has any business being a coach should be teaching that from day one) and the end result is that all high level lacrosse players throw and catch very well with the stick in either hand.

    As someone with a lot of experience leRning things wth both hands in sports and music, it is all about learning it from either side EARLY on and practicing each way often (or it will be much more work to implement later)
     
  16. bigred389

    bigred389 Orange Belt

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    Getting the mechanics down to be ambidextrous isn't actually that hard. As stated, lots of TMAs drill it in from the start. The power even isn't that big of an issue...an orthodox boxer with power can knock you out with a left OR right hook.

    However, coming up with a STRATEGY to be a switch hitter is far more difficult. It's why it's so rarely seen in very sparring heavy striking styles like boxing and Muay Thai.

    When you're working lead/rear hand/leg stuff, a combination or setup that works well for orthodox vs orthodox may not work if you change over to southpaw vs orthodox. But to balance things out, other opportunities will arise. But that still means you have to be able to flip a mental switch and know exactly how to fight in either style...and most people have a hard enough time getting just one down.
     
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  17. blewgums

    blewgums Vintage Buick Racing Bastard

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