Do wrestlers practice breakfalls?

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by SummerStriker, Oct 4, 2013.

  1. SummerStriker

    SummerStriker Black Belt

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    Just a curious question.

    For example, in this video:



    This is really typical in wrestling videos - the guy being thrown reaching out for the ground as he is put down. You would never do that in a judo class.

    What is the wrestling idea on breakfalls?
     
  2. Kozbot

    Kozbot Purple Belt

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    Falling to your back in wrestling=Pin
     
  3. greedysob

    greedysob Blue Belt

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    Wow, that makes me nostalgic. When I was in high school my team went to Carl Adams' wrestling camp during the summer. Our heavyweight used that underhook series to win the state championships and place 3rd in the nation.

    But yeah, what Kozbot said is true. Wrestlers learn to not fall on their backs. That was habbit I had to get rid of when I came to jiu jitsu.
     
  4. INeedARemedy

    INeedARemedy GOAT

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    Huh, I had wondered this as well. Answer makes complete sense. Cool
     
  5. Rod1

    Rod1 Titanium Belt

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    You also lose in judo if you fall on your back.

    My guess is traditionalism and the mats, Judo mats are harder than wrestling mats, and even if modern judo mats are safe, back in the day people trained judo over really hard mats.

    Since judo has a speck of tradtionalism, we still learn to break falls, wrestling lost that training when mats got cushy enough.

    Pro wrestlers do learn to break falls.
     
  6. Black Gi

    Black Gi Gold Belt

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    Nice little instructional.

    Nice leotards also.

    I'd like one in red.
     
  7. DiscipleOfPog

    DiscipleOfPog Green Belt

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    I find wrestling takedowns tend to put you on your butt, whereas Judo takedowns launch you onto your back/neck. Not that wrestling isn't violent, but I feel as far as raw takedown impact, Judo is much worse.
     
  8. DiegoDiegerson

    DiegoDiegerson Green Belt

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    In high-level judo, though, the way they avoid falling on their back for ippon is twisting in the air, isn't it? So there's more ways to do it than putting your arms out.

    I do know that "handstand" is one possible defence against a tomoe nage.
     
  9. Rod1

    Rod1 Titanium Belt

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    Trust me, its the mats.

    You feel you sink a little in a wrestling mat, in a judo mat its like if you were training on a huge pneumatic tire.
     
  10. Rod1

    Rod1 Titanium Belt

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    [YT]fu_oLMJarWY[/YT]
     
  11. DiegoDiegerson

    DiegoDiegerson Green Belt

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    Huh, cool. I guess the dangers of putting your arms out to stop falling are exaggerated? Or is it that either top competitors know how to do it properly, or would rather risk injury than lose a match?
     
  12. Einarr

    Einarr Banned Banned

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    I think generally wrestling takedowns are lower amplitude than Judo throws. The ultimate win in wrestling is getting your opponent in a pin, doesn't matter how you got there. In Judo the ultimate win is a massive throw landing your opponent on their back with force.

    Tell that to Yoshida Hidehiko.
     
  13. mr. tadashi

    mr. tadashi White Belt

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    I know when my brother wrestled in HS one of his team mates liked to use a hip toss and broke a few peoples arms since they posted to try and stop it. The result was the coach constantly trying to keep him from using his hip toss in meets.
     
  14. DiegoDiegerson

    DiegoDiegerson Green Belt

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    You missed the second part - those competitors are doing stuff that would get me yelled at if I tried doing it in class. Is being able to do that without getting hurt a skill that high-level competitors are going to have, or are they just more willing to get hurt if it means a chance at not losing?
     
  15. Rod1

    Rod1 Titanium Belt

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    [YT]0XP9ETfGgA8[/YT]

    You decide.
     
  16. Rod1

    Rod1 Titanium Belt

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    Not extremely risky unless get caught clean, Yoshida at that time probably hadnt been thrown for years, the elite team in Japan dont go tori-uke cycles, they have their particular uke and themselves they are never thrown. He may have lacked acrobatics and many other western training stuff.

    He was probably trained as a machine that cannot lose, and when he lost he posted the arm out of instinct.
     
  17. Dirty Holt

    Dirty Holt Black Belt Professional Fighter

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    Wrestlers do not practice break falls. We dont need to. It has nothing to do with the hardness of the mat. There are 2 main reasons why wrestlers do not train break falls:

    Wrestlers understand that the way you train is the way you compete. Break falling is basically handing your opponent a pin on a silver platter. There are multiple ways to land that will transfer force in a way that will not injure you. Break falling is one of them, but there are others.

    In Judo, when you get thrown, your opponent has much more control over your body than when your opponent throws you in wrestling. When someone has total control over you, break falling makes sense because it will protect your body from the possiblity of catastrophic injury. In wrestling where throw control isnt as great (no gi to grab) this protection isnt needed, and you get a lot more opportunity to scramble and defend mid air without much risk of going under the knife so to speak.
     
  18. Saenchai

    Saenchai Purple Belt

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    ^

    I usually land on my butt when I wrestled in HS.
     
  19. Human Bass

    Human Bass Black Belt

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    Get the ippon, breaks the arm and land on mount, that is the grappling royal flush.
     
  20. jujijimmy

    jujijimmy Blue Belt

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    you dont break fall in fucking competions! you breakfall when you are training to avoid injury. in randoori you might breakfall, you might not it depends on if you get chance to. in comps the last thing your going to do it take the throw and do a nice breakfall. they post their arms out to try and cartwheel out of the throw.
     

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