Boxing/Kickboxing And MMA Career

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by loui_ludwig, Mar 12, 2008.

  1. loui_ludwig

    loui_ludwig Green Belt

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    If you were to compete in combat sports, which would you want to do first? Let say your 22 years old, do 10 years in one combat sports, then at 32 years old, move to the other combat sports.
     
  2. Rinksterk**

    Rinksterk** Banned Banned

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    boxing. Most money one can earn by fighting. More international fame. And since boxing is a combat sport that is deeply rooted in many cultures, you're more likely to be remembered in history.

    Then, kickboxing. Since I would already be very good at boxing (assuming I was a world champ who made millions) it would be easier to transition. Plus if I wanted to get into MMA, I would try out kickboxing/mt and grappling comps to test the waters.

    Then, MMA.
     
  3. Nathan Tagnipez

    Nathan Tagnipez Amateur Fighter

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    agreed! maybe not about the kickboxing part. but definately boxing then mma. boxing for the same reasons.
     
  4. Yanoush

    Yanoush Guest

    i would definitely give boxing a shot because punching is what I'm best at


    but MMA is another good option because I got da wrasslin
     
  5. Curtis Gibbs

    Curtis Gibbs Amateur Fighter

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    Boxing is pretty much the root of striking. thats why im doing it now
     
  6. BorrowDolla

    BorrowDolla Green Belt

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    If you choose boxing, you should start taking steps to make yourself more limber by lots of stretching. That way when you do go to kickboxing, you won't be held back by your inflexibility.

    Also start conditioning your shins.
     
  7. loui_ludwig

    loui_ludwig Green Belt

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    Thanx for the response guys. I posted this topic because i was looking at my old MMA magazine, they have an article where Phil Baroni has some 10 boxing wins and Wladimir Klitsko is a former kickboxer.

    Isn't more ideal to start with MMA or kickboxing then go on to boxing. Boxing seems to take more toll on the body.
     
  8. Chonbody

    Chonbody Guest

    I would start with boxing for the hard work ethic (lb. 4 lb. harder training than muay thai, imo), then move on to muay thai, hopefully you can crosstrain in the 2 and succeed at both. This is my current plan but why pick and choose one over the other, especially in the context of ten mofo' years.
     
  9. ForeverFiending

    ForeverFiending Blue Belt

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    Wow. I must be the only one that thinks boxers have the worst time transitioning to MMA. Out of my experiences with fighters I train with, boxers have a very difficult time transitioning because of the stance and the way the weight is carried, and the bobbing and weaving... there are many things that boxers drill into their heads to become instinctual for defense that would get you wrecked in MMA or MT because it would leave you open to a kick, knee, clinch, elbow, take down, etc.

    It's very hard for boxers to transition to kicking because the weight has be moved backwards. Even if they are flexible, it usually takes a long time to get this. Boxers have to unlearn some things that are highly desired in boxing to compete in other styles... which is very hard to do because instinct takes over sometimes. It can be done, and it is done all the time, but it seems like it takes longer than other styles.

    I don't know about it taking more of a toll on the body. Maybe on the head and neck, but MT and KB wrecks your legs and shins, submissions kill your joints... they're all pretty bad.

    Chonbody... IDK... I really wouldn't say the training is more demanding than MT! not at all.
     
  10. Rinksterk**

    Rinksterk** Banned Banned

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    I'm not gonna make an arguement over what's the toughest, but boxing at the elite level is incredibly tough and horrendous. No other combat sport requires you to take 12 rounds (36minutes) of punishment. Muay Thai matches 5 rounds? K-1 matches are 3 rounds unless the judges can't decide who won. Title fights in MMA are 25 minutes.
    Imagine how much you have to condition yourself to fight 12 rounds of eating punches. Can you imagine eating punches from a guy like Cotto (a guy who's fractured a person's face) for 36 minutes? With the huge (bigger than MT and MMA) talent pool of professional boxing, it takes incredible athleticism and mental fortitude to fight at the elite level. Not saying athletes of other combat sports aren't tough or athletic, but you have to factor in length of matches and overall size of the sport.

    And on boxers not being able to transition to MMA, how many elite boxers actually do transition to MMA? Some nobody with a few four rounders sucking at MMA isn't exactly representative of the whole sport. I can make the arguement that BJJ guys suck at MMA since I train with BJJers who fight in MMA and are horrible at it. But you know how stupid that argument is. Not to mention the thread wasn't even about boxers going into MMA.
     
  11. WildCard

    WildCard Blue Belt

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    I train boxing because I feel that in MMA if you have good hands you are good to go throw in some kicking ability and you will be good.

    However

    I feel in order to really be anything in MMA you need to be well rounded so I think developing a whole game is good if you have 10 years of boxing and start BJJ or ground game at 32 your time in the game is scarce by the time your a purple belt you will already be around 35 or more.

    I just think developing one is good but no sense in ignoring the rest starting at a late age such as 22 you have more technique to learn you have to catch up with those crazy fucks who have been doing it since they were 15.

    I train boxing and BJJ equally and some clinch/takedowns sprinkled in the week I feel it's my best chance to get better.
     
  12. KidKimura

    KidKimura Yellow Belt

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    just do what makes you happy, worry about a carreer or whatever when it happens
     
  13. ForeverFiending

    ForeverFiending Blue Belt

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    True TITLE fights in boxing go up to 12 rounds, which is insane. BUT in MT and MMA rounds can be up to 5 minutes each. AND you forgot that in these other styles you are using other muscle groups that expend a lot of energy. Like kicks, grappling, and my GOD clinching is pretty freakin exhausting!

    No, it does not represent all boxers transitioning to MMA. But given the fight style in general I see it being easier for someone to switch from KB or MT to MMA as opposed to boxing. And yea, you could make the argument that BJJ guys have a hard time transitioning too! for sure. This person wanted to know how to start off, and if the goal is ultimately MMA, then it's important to know there are potential bad habits that can be developed from learning a certain style. I am all about boxing, don't get me wrong. I think anyone who is serious about fighting needs to take a good part of their training to focus on the wonderful world of boxing.
     
  14. DangerDan

    DangerDan Guest

    So I guess it's better to start off in an individual sport and focus on it than to take mma classes or several different fighting art classes at the same time?
     
  15. fightingrabbit

    fightingrabbit Banned Banned

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    My aspirations from the start was to learn to Box. Because my parents thought it was such a brutal sport they wouldnt let me join. So i took up wrestling, and i thought it would be badass to be an NHB fighter, so i entertained that thought for a while and still am. Now that i did take up Boxing though, its starting to turn out to be everything i thought it was. So yeah im sticking with it. But i'd so love to get in a cage at least once in my life and rough and tumble with some of those cats. lol Shit.. i still remember how to sprawl..kinda..

    but yeah, train in a sport that interests you first off. Thats all i can say.

    I'd say so, training in a MMA class seems too wishy washy. While yes they train and prepare you for everything, you dont exactly sharpen your skills to a point as you would taking a straight boxing, bjj, MT, class IMO. Cliche, Jack of all trades, Master of none. I'd rather be a killer in one aspect of my game than mediocre in all the combat sports.
     
  16. ForeverFiending

    ForeverFiending Blue Belt

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    I agree with fightingrabbit that you can easily become the jack or all, master of none. That's why I go to different trainers for different styles who are very good/experienced at the style they teach. I even go to different gyms for this. I ask all the questions I want, and I don't take anything anyone says for 100% because in this sport there are all kinds of different ways of doing things. I focus on the styles that interest me the most.

    Many MANY times people I train with and trainers contradict eachother ALL the time. Be prepared for this. I do a lot of research on my own. I use youtube (there are some good instructional videos on there), myspace (chatting with fighters from all over the world with different styles... they are always answering my questions), and this forum to get IDEAS of what I want to do with what I am learning.

    It is very tricky learning different styles. I love it though because I can become the type of fighter I want to become. So, also watch fighters and decide what kind of fighter you want to be and through training you will also learn your strengths and weaknesses. Everyone has natural abilities and drawbacks. Your body, mind, personality all contribute to what type of fighting style you are meant for :D hope that helps some!
     
  17. NinjaKilla187

    NinjaKilla187 Blue Belt

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    *Good* boxers never switch to MMA. Why would they when they can make 10 times the money in boxing? MMA attracts the very best of BJJ, Folk and Greco Wrestling, Judo etc., but only gets the boxers that couldn't make it.
     

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