Best way to learn?

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by Trickster***, Mar 10, 2008.

  1. Trickster***

    Trickster*** Banned Banned

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    Whats up guys? I was wondering what you guys feel is better approach to learning BJJ...

    Do you think its best to focus on one aspect of your game at a time (ex. guard, then half guard, then mount etc) OR is it better just to learn a lil of each position until your game is complete?

    I bring this up bc I have a torney in less than a month and I feel totally unprepared! I can't think of one part of my game that is sharp enough to consider it my "go to" in the tourney. If my guard was amazing I would jump guard or sit on my ass and play open guard but I dont even feel that confident.

    So Im wondering if you guys think its a better approach to focus solely on certain aspects of my game until I feel comfortable OR just keep rolling until it all falls into place?
     
  2. LeatherWhip

    LeatherWhip Guest

    After getting pwned in my first tourney ever? work on technique & positioning plus general mat time. Also, keep your mental game sharp, and make sure you get mat time, mat time, mat time.

    So basically a combination of both.
     
  3. JamesBJJ.**

    JamesBJJ.** Guest

    Do like me, get your ass kicked everyday by blue and purple belts. I think my defence is solid, too bad you dont get points for escaping full mount and re gaining guard.
     
  4. Trickster***

    Trickster*** Banned Banned

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    I just hate losing (I dont care about in class but at a tourney its different) so I want to feel prepared next month...

    I think Im going to really work my guard from now til then....so I at least have something I can rely on
     
  5. LeatherWhip

    LeatherWhip Guest

    Losing is inevitable, even the great Roger Gracie has lost. Use it as controlled fuel to get better.
     
  6. Chris Kimmerly

    Chris Kimmerly Amateur Fighter

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    The way I teach is the way I ws taught. Start with a certain technique, drill it a while, then learn a counter or defence and drill it for a while then try and use it during live rolling. Do this each session.
     
  7. Gsoares2***

    Gsoares2*** Banned Banned

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    you need a general base to get you started..

    Once you have a base and have things to go to from every position.. it helps to pick isolated parts of your game and expand on them.

    Take general classes to develop your base.. once your confident you know what your doing.. pick more isolated groups of things to work on.. such as guillotines, or kimuras..

    Working on your "guard" is such a general and broad statement that im guessing you still need a lot of development on your general base..

    but basicly do what ever works for you.. just got to class.. justy keep training.. and try not to get hurt... thats the best way to learn.
     
  8. Chris Kimmerly

    Chris Kimmerly Amateur Fighter

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    Oh about losing.... get used to it. IT happens and believe me if your smart you will learn alot from losing. For example one training session I kept getting caught and tapped with shoulerlocks,(kimuras, paintbrush, keylocks etc) . From that day on I learned 3 defences for them and have never been caught since.

    YOu learn way more when you lose. ALso do not go into every training session with the sole intent on tapping everyone out. WOrk on youe weaknesses
     
  9. Trickster***

    Trickster*** Banned Banned

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    Ya I couldnt agree more...Ive learned more from my loses than I have my wins, no question about it!

    But that doenst change the fact that I would rather go in the prepared and win as opposed to losing. Hopefully I will be able to video tape my matches and have you guys rip me apart....I can take the heat. =)

    I dont care about getting tapped in training...its practice! The only time I go out of my way to win in practice is when someone taps me and gets all excited like I was trying my hardest...then I have to turn it up a notch and tap him out back a few times
     
  10. BCarr

    BCarr Blue Belt

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    Just keep drilling and remember to use the drills when you roll that day.

    I have to say the one thing that gets me about new students is that, even though I'm giving them the position, they won't take advantage and work the drills they were taught that day.

    But I find if I talk them through it a couple times while rolling and let them know that's what they need to do, they'll find their way to it.

    Then again, I do know those guys who will just work the white belts over instead of letting them work their drills.
     
  11. Chris Kimmerly

    Chris Kimmerly Amateur Fighter

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    Its those guys that never compete bacuse they really cant beat anyone thier own level. I know alot of those guys
     
  12. Cash Bill 52

    Cash Bill 52 Brown Belt

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    IMO you shouldn't focus too much on new things before a tourney. Focus on your strengths for now. Learn some new things later. Follow your gameplan.
     
  13. Sasquatch

    Sasquatch Guest

    I compete so i get better but starting off with the basics is best then from there i work on my weakest points. You will never feel "ready" for competition at least i never do. Next weekend will be my first tourney as a blue belt im sure il learn alot.
     
  14. PBruske234

    PBruske234 White Belt

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    Sometimes you have to go back, in order to go forward. Take what you know, drill it, and make sure you are doing everything perfect. A small flaw in hand, foot, hip placement could be the difference between winning and losing. Like its been said a million times, develop your base, and build off it. Builders don't start working from the roof down. They build from the base up. Also there is an old saying that says "“I fear not the man who has practiced 10,000 kicks once, but I fear the man who has practiced one kick 10,000 times.” Don't worry about stuffing a bunch of new stuff into your head. When your in your tourney and your bodies natural "fight or flight" response kicks in, you are naturally going to go back and use the things that have been drilled into your head, not the new crap you tried to stuff in. Oh and good luck!
     
  15. slideyfoot

    slideyfoot Artemis BJJ Co-Founder

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    Personally, I think its best to train by focusing on a few techniques at a time over a long period. Every time you spar, aim to use those techniques. That way, you make slight adjustments each lesson, trying to take away at least one positive you can apply to your game, until you should be pretty decent with that set of techniques.

    I also find it helps with motivation, as its a useful way of ignoring ego: you're not thinking about 'winning' or 'losing', just making technical improvements.

    Then again, I don't compete much - just once so far.
     

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