Arm post response while passing an opponent.

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by chem31, Sep 28, 2010.

  1. chem31 Purple Belt

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    What do you guys like to do when passing a guy who likes to bench press to replace guard? I am light so I have this problem a lot. A good pair off stiff arms make my passes a lot harder.

    Instructor keeps telling me North/South or knee on belly. Problem is it doesn't always work and sometimes ends up letting the opponent off his back..

    Sage advice with details would be appreciated.
     
  2. fourfif** Banned Banned

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    get a real tough head and arm series going, and when they start worrying about that take their back.
     
  3. chem31 Purple Belt

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    The problem when is when the elbows are a bit bent it stops a lot of subs and knee on belly.
     
  4. Fedorzilla Brown Belt

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    Gi or no gi?

    in either scenario, if they are benching you, pull up on their near-side elbow, step your inside foot up to their armpit and (a) take KOB or (b) step over with the other leg for the armbar (much easier with the gi)

    Also, for example, if I'm passing to the left side with a knee slide and get pretty much past and they start to bench, I will also sometimes just post my head on the mat (same side), block/pin their legs with my back side (right) shoulder, and then switch my lower body over to the opposite side. This avoids the power vs. power of pushing into their bench press. Normally, they will try to roll away after you switch sides (to their right in the example above). I wait for this and when they roll away I grab their arm for the armbar, or their near side shoulder or the back of the collar to prevent the roll (Florian did this beautifully when he passed guard on Joe Daddy) and establish side control.
     
  5. Calibur Jiu Jitsu Snob

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    Wiggle.

    If both your left hip and right hip are square to him and he is posting on your chest than slightly turn your body so that only your left hip is facing him. Than square up again (his hands should slide off a little) than shift again (his hands will slide more) and again and again until you get past his arms completely. I consider that the jiu jitsu way of doing things. You could always just switch to North/South which does the same thing which is changing your body plane so your opponent looses leverage (ie:something to push off of)

    It actually is much easier to understand when you see it, but it's that little thing that good bjj guys do to "crush through" posting arms that makes jujitsu seem magical.
     
  6. chem31 Purple Belt

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    The pull arm up strategy is pretty standard, hard to do in gi, even harder in no gi. Never works for me on a bigger equally skilled opponent.

    I like the second strategy tho. Let me see if I understand correctly. You control with an arm while you drop your body/head to the pass side, then "cartwheel" over to sidecontrol?
     
  7. chem31 Purple Belt

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    Yeh I saw Roy Dean teach this. Saw sam Braga molest a purple belts guard replace attempts that way too. Going to go watch those vids again.

    More tips would be nice tho.
     
  8. SuperSuperRambo Steel Belt

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    For me it's knee on belly almost every time.
     

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