What age is too old to start mma

Discussion in 'Worldwide MMA Discussion' started by Sanmartinortiz, Mar 19, 2017.

  1. Sanmartinortiz White Belt

    Sanmartinortiz
    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2017
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Mainly for curiosity 2008 they said around age 20 was the limit, now I'm curious as to now
     
    #1
  2. TheLastEmperorReurns Purple Belt

    TheLastEmperorReurns
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2017
    Messages:
    1,704
    Likes Received:
    3,100
    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY
    Travis Browne had no martial arts experience and began training MMA at the age of 26.

    He eventually became a top 3 HW.

    I'm not going to count guys like Randy Couture because I consider any amount of training in wrestling or boxing to be MMA training.
     
    #2
  3. milliniar Who needs a belt?

    milliniar
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2010
    Messages:
    20,808
    Likes Received:
    7,352
    Location:
    Wade Wilson's Hometown
    I'm having my first ammy fight at 36 on may 12th. Been training 3+ yrs ish injuries and stuff make it less than 2.5
     
    #3
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2017
  4. ThunderL1ps Black Belt

    ThunderL1ps
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2013
    Messages:
    5,144
    Likes Received:
    1,482
    I think it's less about age and more about being physically and mental prepared. You can't be some guy rolling off the couch even in your 20's and expect to be some sort of pro fighter -- unless you want to get absolutely starched. There should be a history of physicality in your life at the very least.
     
    #4
    TakadaDojoKeith, Mixfight and mon like this.
  5. chamcham Blue Belt

    chamcham
    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2007
    Messages:
    790
    Likes Received:
    594
    IIRC, Daniel Cormier started at 30.
     
    #5
    spinitch likes this.
  6. Cro Cop Is Back Red Belt

    Cro Cop Is Back
    Joined:
    May 21, 2007
    Messages:
    8,986
    Likes Received:
    6,763
    Location:
    Sherdog
  7. Hellhammer84 Yellow Belt

    Hellhammer84
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Messages:
    162
    Likes Received:
    59
    There's a guy who had his first fight in his 70s a while back . Granted of course it was still some really small time show but it's still bad ass in my opinion
     
    #7
    Langinbang187 likes this.
  8. Rea_ctor Brown Belt

    Rea_ctor
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2016
    Messages:
    2,908
    Likes Received:
    3,456
    I like consider myself fit for 31, I had my second attempt at mma at around 29, injuries, injuries, injuries haha it may be my bad luck, but for me it was a little too late, I ate well, took good supplements, even ghrp peptides and my recovery was shocking :(
     
    #8
  9. Twelve75 Black Belt

    Twelve75
    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2015
    Messages:
    7,248
    Likes Received:
    5,643
    Location:
    Pangaea
    Wouldn't start in my 40's,mid 30's would be my cut off.
     
    #9
  10. qw3rty WAMMA Belt

    qw3rty
    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2014
    Messages:
    7,613
    Likes Received:
    6,549
    Location:
    .AR
    I'd say if you start training full time having 0 background in any martial arts, you need at least 2/3 years to compete as an amateur.

    after that is up to you, maybe another 2/3 years taking a fight every 4/5 months if you stay healthy
     
    #10
    mon likes this.
  11. Xuh Black Belt

    Xuh
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2002
    Messages:
    6,135
    Likes Received:
    5,741
    Location:
    Oxford, England
    I'd say 65
     
    #11
    Mixfight likes this.
  12. sen2two Bangarang!

    sen2two
    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2010
    Messages:
    162
    Likes Received:
    87
    Location:
    Orlando, FL
    Fighting is brutal. If you start young your beat up by 30. Injuries are almost unavoidable in this sport. In my opinion, most often, MMA fighters don't reach their full potential for this reason.

    If you get a late start to MMA, but we're athletic and fit, you have your "man" strength, wisdom, and life knowledge. And I believe a better chance at achieving your actual potential.

    Personally, I think a high level gymnast or top tier rock climber could be a force if they started training at 22-23. But still have a very good chance in their later 20's.
     
    #12
    agibmxmma and 0MasterOnYx0 like this.
  13. gimp0 Yellow Card

    gimp0
    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2009
    Messages:
    4,136
    Likes Received:
    7,335
    I think it depends on how athletic you are. If you are decently fit and athletic, I'd say maybe 35 but that also depends what weight division.

    I also wondered...anyone know if a lot of fighters go on painkillers after tough fights?
     
    #13
  14. ChangeIsComing Brown Belt

    ChangeIsComing
    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2013
    Messages:
    4,339
    Likes Received:
    1,677
    Important there is no limit...

    But considering a career in MMA after 35....without any background... never going to happen.

    But it's never to late to learn anything.
     
    #14
    mon likes this.
  15. Ibm Purple Belt

    Ibm
    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2011
    Messages:
    2,403
    Likes Received:
    274
    Never too old. depends on the individual.
     
    #15
    agibmxmma, mon and Frank23 like this.
  16. Frank23 Gold Belt

    Frank23
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2010
    Messages:
    30,140
    Likes Received:
    10,986
    Just do it.
     
    #16
    agibmxmma and mon like this.
  17. cmw43 Bad Boys Club

    cmw43
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2006
    Messages:
    8,143
    Likes Received:
    3,484
    Painkillers are pretty rife among fighters, wrestlers and football players.

    Brendan Schaubs talked about how he got hooked on oxy's after recovering from surgery.
     
    #17
  18. ThunderL1ps Black Belt

    ThunderL1ps
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2013
    Messages:
    5,144
    Likes Received:
    1,482
    I agree with most everything but your last paragraph. That is like saying a power lifter or NFL player will make a great mixed martial artist based on what they can do in the weight room. Most people cannot take the punishment of getting beat on, even during the training portion where there is no cash flow opportunities.

    Outside of their fixed fights, Pancrase and RINGS had things right I think about developing fighters. Instead of killing yourself in the dojo and fighting twice a year, there were more fights and the ways you could take damage was limited in terms of strikes on the ground or to the face. Former UFC matchmaker John Peretti was a big proponent of not allowing strikes to the head on the ground due to the hammer/anvil effect it had on the brain.

    More fights are possible this way, along with the in ring experience --not to mention building a following for fighters. No need for a 400 fighter roster either.
     
    #18
  19. sen2two Bangarang!

    sen2two
    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2010
    Messages:
    162
    Likes Received:
    87
    Location:
    Orlando, FL
    NFL and NBA athletes are not right for combat sports. In my opinion anyways. Which dosn't mean much. One thing that is most often disregarded is body mechanics. Understanding and controlling your body. I have a break dancing background. I came into MMA/BJJ late. 27 I think. I picked it pretty quick by most standards because I already had a good understanding of how to control my body and use foot work. Which are the 2 hardest things to get over when starting.

    While NFL players are explosive. They don't have much else to offer. And I don't really see any Crossover talents for NBA players.
     
    #19
  20. Phrozenspite Black Belt

    Phrozenspite
    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2010
    Messages:
    6,362
    Likes Received:
    4,798
    werdum hadn't started training at all(even in BJJ) til after 21 i think.
     
    #20

Share This Page

monitoring_string = "fd5733925866a04e50edd70f38dfaa35"
monitoring_string = "603ac9fff68f23709f2a42bf5e29272b"