The UFC should put hard 7.5% rehydration limits on weight

Discussion in 'UFC Discussion' started by Alpha_T83, Dec 11, 2017.

  1. Alpha_T83

    Alpha_T83 Blue Belt

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    I think it's ridiculous how much weight MMA fighters cut. This has been discussed to death, but eventually someone is going to outright die from weight cuts in the UFC. And weight cutting makes the brain more vulnerable to TBI's, which is detrimental to a fighters long term health.

    Why don't they just implement hard 7.5% rehydration caps? For example, if you fight at 170, 7.5% of 170 is 12.75 pounds. Thus, welterweight fighters shouldn't under any circumstance be allowed to walk into the cage heavier than 182.75 pounds. Obviously this is just an example -- you could up that number to 10% rehydration (187 pound hard limit for walk-in to cage at welterweight), at least to start.

    Also, regardless of whether this is implemented -- every fighter should be weighed walking into the cage, and their weight published. We should know exactly how much each fighter weighs in the cage. This public information would at least help start a dialogue on extreme weight cutting.
     
  2. SaintSoldier

    SaintSoldier Brown Belt

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    Yep, this can easily be accomplished by weighing the fighter again as they step into the octagon. You don't have to cancel the fight if they are over-weight; just take away 50% of their purse (1st offense), and then 75% for 2nd offense onward.

    They will quickly learn it's not worth it, just like using PEDs in the USADA era.
     
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  3. Skylako

    Skylako Brown Belt

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    Because fighters will do whatever is necessary to get that advantage, and will just monitor how much they rehydrate before stepping into the cage - which is more dangerous than having them dehydrate themselves 24 hours before.

    Also, the UFC will never have fight night weights public, they like to sell certain narratives about how big/small certain fighters are.
     
  4. joeyjoejoe

    joeyjoejoe Silver Belt

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    I agree that the weight cutting issue in MMA needs to be addressed in a more professional way in the future. Seems like a can of worms the UFC doesn’t want to open lol.
     
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  5. SaintSoldier

    SaintSoldier Brown Belt

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    The fight night weight doesn't have to be made public. And why would someone fight dehydrated just to gain a few extra lbs? That negates any advantage they would have.
     
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  6. Alpha_T83

    Alpha_T83 Blue Belt

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    And they'll learn the hard way that doesn't work. If they try to dehydrate themselves walking into the cage, their cardio will suck and they'll lose. Fighters will do anything to get an advantage, but dehydrating on fight day is not going to give you an advantage.

    Fighters are smart. They'll learn quickly and adapt.
     
  7. czitos188

    czitos188 Blue Belt

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    amazing article
    https://tim.blog/2013/05/06/how-to-cut-weight-ufc/

    How pros cut weight with Dr. John Berardi, nutritional advisor to athletes like UFC champion Georges St. Pierre.
    30 pounds in one week.

    Many UFC fighters used this article to cut weight on their own
     
  8. JOLLYjoe

    JOLLYjoe Brown Belt

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    Is it a weight cutting issue, or is it a discipline issue?
     
  9. Alpha_T83

    Alpha_T83 Blue Belt

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    Definitely weight cutting. These guys have to have tons of discipline to cut the weight they do. Just imagine a fighter cutting 5 pounds to make 170, having to fight GSP or Woodley, who cut 25-30 pounds.

    If you weigh 175, you're at a 20-25 pound weight disadvantage. That's why these guys cut weight, to gain a competitive advantage.
     
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  10. Wsb390

    Wsb390 White Belt

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    I know being a former college wrestler that it never stopped us from cutting weight with weigh ins the same day as matches
     
  11. JOLLYjoe

    JOLLYjoe Brown Belt

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    My point on discipline is some of these fighters, for example, who fights at 155 saying they weigh 190-200lbs when they aren't fighting.
    Yes, I get that it is fat % offseason. But still.
     
  12. czitos188

    czitos188 Blue Belt

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    "POWER TEST: VERTICAL JUMP


    Baseline: 31.7 inches
    After Dehydration: 27.6 inches
    Re-hydrated: 29 inches

    STRENGTH ENDURANCE TEST: 225-POUND BENCH PRESS

    Baseline: 15 reps
    After Dehydration: 5 reps
    Rehydrated: 12 reps

    ENDURANCE TEXT: MAX TIME ON TREADMILL

    Baseline: 3 minutes and 14 seconds of sprinting at 8mph with 6% incline
    After Dehydration: 1 minute and 28 seconds of sprinting at 8mph with 3% incline
    Rehydrated: 3 minutes and 25 seconds of sprinting at 8mph with 6% incline"

    it effects athlete a little bit.
     
  13. BionicCommando

    BionicCommando Silver Belt

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    Believe this is more of a commission issue, no?
     
  14. Samgyeopsal

    Samgyeopsal Red & Green MIX!

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    Hendricks, Gastelum, and Lineker have absolutely horrible discipline when it comes to diet.
     
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  15. oldschoolmmafan

    oldschoolmmafan NERD BASH 2018

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    As with Lomachenko vs Rigondeaux, they were weighed again in the morning prior to the fight to make sure one fighter hadn't had an insane re-hydration weight gain after breakfast.
     
  16. The Penetrator

    The Penetrator Blue Belt

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    OR

    just weigh in 3 hours before the fight.

    Problem solved.
     
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  17. Yamcha

    Yamcha White Belt

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    Great post, I wholeheartedly agree.

    It shouldn't be that Mcgregor (although I do enjoy his fights and would even call myself a fan to an extent) is so publicly known and loved when a masvidal who's actually around the same size, is known by maybe 1/100th the people. If information like this was publicized the people who take DON'T advantage of things like weight cuts would be more known.

    Sadly though the UFC greatly values their ability to distort reality to whatever is most profitable, and hiding metrics such as these allows them to build highly inaccurate narratives to dress their desired fighters in, while subsequently undermining badasses like masvidal and wonderboy who barely cut weight at all but the populous doesn't know that so it doesn't make those guys more impressive when it absolutely should.

    Guys who fight around their true weight deserve respect, or maybe the guys who DO cut huge weight should receive LESS respect then they currently receive.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2017
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  18. wartor

    wartor Thug #22 Belt

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    It's exactly why it's the same day and it's an NCAA rule. http://www.ncaa.org/playing-rules/wrestling-rules-game

    They are even clamping down harder than ever: http://www.ncaa.com/news/wrestling/...-rules-committee-recommends-stiffer-penalties

    The NCAA didn't want me or you to die or have organ failure like they saw over and over again in the Olympics and Pan Am games.

    12lbs was a big cut from what I remember. We are talking about guys going 30lbs+ fighting at 155lbs! In 24 hours.
     
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  19. MastiffMike

    MastiffMike The BIG dog is here

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    I've said it before and I'll keep saying it, the UFC needs to utilize USADA to help manage weight cuts. By that I mean, it's easy to have USADA weigh the fighters each time they're tested (it might already be part of the sample collection process?). Also weigh the fighters at the beginning of fight week (and any other time they're available - with a fighter required to be weighed at least 10 times a year).

    Then average what they've weighed over the last 6 months and limit the maximum (say something like 8%) they can cut prior to the official weigh-in. Also, limit how much they can re-hydrate to (say a maximum of +5%).

    So a Welterweight has to maintain an average weight of no more than 185. They can cut down to the 171 but then can only re-hydrate to 180 when they walk into the cage.

    Place some hefty fines for missing the mark cageside (50% of purse sounds good). Also, if their average weight puts them too far from the division they want to fight in, they're not allowed/offered a fight in that division until they either maintain a lower average weight (in the mean time they could fight at the weight class higher, since their numbers would be acceptable then).

    So with a structure like this, the fighters would have to be professional and accountable for their weight much more than just a 24 hour period. They'd be limited as to how much they can weigh, how much they can cut, and how much they can re-hydrate. However, with a structure like this there'd be enough flexibility for customizing it to what works for each fighter. Some might perform better with a full 8% cut and only 5% re-hydration (i.e. fighting slightly dehydrated), while others might prefer to maintain a lower off-season weight so they're only cutting 6% and then fully re-hydrating.
     
  20. Wsb390

    Wsb390 White Belt

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    I understand come from some one now at 32 who's now had kidney problems. I agree the weight cutting issue needs to be addressed granted I'm not sure how the right way is to go about it because there will always be people looking to gain a competitive edge.
     

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