looking to buy a gaming PC

Discussion in 'Video Game Forum' started by 90three, Jun 27, 2018.

  1. 90 50

    90 50 Red Belt

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    Yeah, I can an am doing that.

    But it’s not as simple as new and old iX etc, each one has levels of cores, clock speeds and other differentiators so there is more to it than

    Yo, is the old i5 better than the new i3.

    From the outside one would think that all i3’s are old, 5’s and sevens are newer but there’s levels to that shit.

    So yes I know how to google that shit, and reviewing everything and how they work together takes time. I’m in that process now.
     
  2. Madmick

    Madmick Scholar of Taghaza Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    This became the god-reference for benchmark comparisons with impressive celerity:
    http://cpu.userbenchmark.com/

    All you really need to understand is the difference between single core (or per-thread) performance versus multicore overall performance, and how that affects performance depending on the software. For gamers, the "Effective Speed" metric basically assigns the most sensible overall grade for a CPU's gaming power.
     
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  3. jefferz

    jefferz Gold Belt Platinum Member

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    Here's how you figure out Intel's naming scheme.
    [​IMG]
    If there's a K in the Product Line Suffix, it means that it's unlocked and can be overclocked. You need a Z series chipset motherboard to overclock, a Z370 for example. If there is not a K at the end, the product is locked and can't be overclocked.

    Up until the 8th gen
    Intel i3 - 2 cores / 4 threads
    Intel i5 - 4 cores / 4 threads
    Intel i7 - 4 cores / 8 threads


    8th Gen changed it a little
    Intel i3 - 4 cores / 4 threads
    Intel i5 - 6 cores / 6 threads
    Intel i7 - 6 cores / 12 threads
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2018
  4. GtehMVP

    GtehMVP Brown Belt

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    Building a computer is not as easy as everyone says it is, if you don't know what you're doing, though I do recommend learning. Anyway, never buy prebuilt, it's such a waste of money. There are lot's of services out there that will build your pc for you, and help you order the parts.
     
  5. JohnOates

    JohnOates Orange Belt

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    Jump in. It's amazing how quickly you catch up!
     
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  6. Madmick

    Madmick Scholar of Taghaza Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    This is not accurate.
     
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  7. JoshTehV

    JoshTehV Orange Belt

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    That question tells me you didnt google the differnce between an i3 an i5 and a i7 lol, some i5s are just qaud core i7s without the hyperthreading, but you want hyperthreading if you can afford it.
     
  8. ObsoleteSoul

    ObsoleteSoul Silver Belt

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    What part do you feel is difficult about it?
    Cable management is about the only time consuming part of it imo. Not hard though, just annoying sometimes.
     
  9. GtehMVP

    GtehMVP Brown Belt

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    The biggest thing I find people struggle with, who don't know what they're doing, are getting all their drivers installed properly.
     
  10. GtehMVP

    GtehMVP Brown Belt

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    I'm sure great deals can be found, but i've always found it far cheaper to build your own.
     
  11. 90 50

    90 50 Red Belt

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    From what I wrote how did you gleam I didn’t know all of that?

    Im trying to decern, what I actually need for my intended uses, what’s the best budget way of doing it, and what works together the best.

    So I started out price shopping, finding processors I was interested in and looking up the bench marks, then comparing.

    If you say for example go to new egg, and search ryzen 5, there is a whole stack of ryzen 5 processors , 3 processors and 7 processors.

    Take a price point you are happy with, and compare from each.

    At the 200.00 price point you can find a version from each, now compare their benchmarks and also try and decern what type of softwares and loads work best with the ranges you have.

    At the 200.00 mark you might find a 5 that’s faster than a 7, according to straight benchmarks but might not nessesarily be better for the given application.

    Then dig into the gpu’s and do the same, now you have a short list of products you are interested in , and now try and decern which paring jives the best together for the intended application.

    Then you have the intel side with the weird naming conventions, skylake, coffee lake etc and gleam that down, I haven’t looked up what those mean yet, but I’m sure those are the generation naming , like apple and thier snow leopards and el capitans etc etc.

    Just because I didn’t write a novel on someone else’s thread, doesn’t mean I don’t know there are different core stacks, clock speeds and hyper threading for each one.

    <{vega}>
     
  12. 90 50

    90 50 Red Belt

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    I imagine there are literally thousands of people out there that said
    “I’m gonna build a computer today”
    And ordered a bunch of stuff online(new or used even) that didn’t work well together, if at all.

    Stuff like drivers not working together is even past what I’m talking about; from the get go like connector types not being right etc from different eras of stuff. This I’m sure has to happen everyday for budget build people.
     
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  13. MUSTKILL

    MUSTKILL Brown Belt

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    Just go get one from iBUYPOWER.
    You can have it custom made, and they're fairly reasonably priced.
    You can get a decent rig for $1,200-1,500.
    Just make sure you have at least:
    8GB of RAM or greater
    256GB SSD or greater
    GTX 1070 or greater
    i5 or i7 8th gen CPU
     
  14. GhostZ06

    GhostZ06 Steel Belt

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    [​IMG]
     
  15. 90 50

    90 50 Red Belt

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    There are so many 1070 and 1080’s for sale locally from people dumping their mining rigs it’s ridiculous
     
  16. jefferz

    jefferz Gold Belt Platinum Member

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    What are the prices around you? i'm going to pick up a Gigabyte 1070ti tomorrow for $275.
     
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  17. 90 50

    90 50 Red Belt

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    250-300 advertised prices so can prolly haggle 2-250 depending on brand for 1070’s and 400 for 1080’s
     
  18. jefferz

    jefferz Gold Belt Platinum Member

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    Thanks for info.
     
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  19. Madmick

    Madmick Scholar of Taghaza Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    It's really not that complicated if you just focus on the present build, and not understanding everything all at once. There are incredible tools like the following with built-in compatibility checkers:
    https://pcpartpicker.com/list/

    It isn't perfect, but that is only with obscure incompatibilies. You will never buy the wrong motherboard for the wrong CPU with this guide. You will never buy the wrong hard drive (and you're not going to find any IDE drives on the market today anyways) for the motherboard, or screw up connector types. The obscure stuff is, for example, with a certain motherboard, in a certain case, with a certain CPU cooler, the way it is mounted, it ends up blocking your drives, or unable to fit. Those are incredibly rare. That takes more discussion to prevent. The more basic problem you might run into is a compatible PSU with insufficient wattage for your build, since I don't think PCPP has a PSU calculator built in, yet.

    You should look at the "Complete Guides to Building a PC" here:
    https://www.reddit.com/r/buildapc/wiki/beginnersguide
     
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  20. 90 50

    90 50 Red Belt

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    Thanks, this part of the thread you posted is what I’m really trying to figure out I need to go do some digging at the Red forum I think for some answers.

     

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