International The Space, Science, Technology thread: Milestone in search for extraterrestrial life!

Discussion in 'The War Room' started by JDragon, Jan 1, 2019.

  1. JDragon

    JDragon DOX News Anchor Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    14,196
    Likes Received:
    18,056
    Location:
    Germany
    This thread covers space mission by multiple countries that sometimes were conducted in international cooperation. In the absence of a Science or Tech tag, this is the most fitting.

    2018 has been a pretty exciting year regarding everything that had to do with space exploration. Here is a look back at some key events, heavy credits go to this article.


    Return to Mars

    After a six-month journey of more than 300 million miles, NASA’s InSight lander arrived at Mars on Nov. 26, plunking down for a two-year mission to study the interior of the Red Planet. The dramatic landing was NASA’s first on Mars since 2012. Less than two weeks after landing at a spot near the Martian border called Elysium Planitia, the InSight lander snapped its first selfie using a camera on its 6-foot-long robotic arm and captured the first "sounds" of wind blowing on Mars.

    Comet or Aliens?

    Astronomers first spied a strange cigar-shaped object swinging past the sun last year, but it wasn’t until 2018 that astronomers used the Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based observatories to conclude that Oumuamua is a small comet. But debate about the mysterious object continues, with some respected scientists saying there’s a chance it could be an alien spacecraft.

    Asteroids, the cool kind of roids

    After its own multi-year journey, NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft snuggled up to a skyscraper-size asteroid known as Bennu. The space probe reached Bennu on Dec. 3 and will spend about a year surveying and mapping the 1,600-foot-wide asteroid. The probe has already found water on the space rock. In 2020, a sample will be taken to be returned to Earth (!) in 2023.

    Falcon Heavy Launch



    Super impressive feat by SpaceX and a real milestone. The Tesla roadster aboard is already more than 200 million miles from Earth and I guess it is safe to say it has more mileage than every other car im history...

    Voyager 2 reaches interstellar space

    NASA's Voyager 2 probe is now just the second human-made object to reach interstellar space. On Dec. 10, the space agency announced that the well-traveled spacecraft has exited the heliosphere, or "the protective bubble of particles and magnetic fields created by the sun." The probe is now more than 11 billion miles from Earth. Its twin, the Voyager 1 spacecraft, reached interstellar space in 2012.

    Voyager 2 is about 11,182,000,000 miles away from Earth as I type this. (You can see the current figures here.) If we assume you can drive from San Francisco to LA and back in a (damn exhausting) day, you would still need about 40,000 years to reach the point where Voyager currently is with your car. At that point, Voyager 2 would be long gone already, of course, at its speed of 34,000 mph - but still only at a quarter of the distance to our next star.

    Proof of ice on the moon

    Scientists said in August they discovered the first definitive evidence of water ice on the lunar surface. The ice, detected at the moon’s north and south poles, could serve as a source of water for future lunar expeditions or to sustain moon colonies.

    A new planet hunter is deployed

    On April 18, the planet-hunting TESS satellite launched into orbit to search for alien worlds that might harbor life. The $337 million spacecraft, designed to operate for two years, is equipped with four specialized cameras that will allow it to look for exoplanets in orbit around 20 million stars. It follows the retired Kepler telescope that discovered more than 2000 planets in 9 years.

    NASA's solar probe

    On Aug. 12, NASA launched the first mission to “touch the sun.” The centerpiece of the mission is the Parker Solar Probe, a car-sized spacecraft designed to explore an ultra-hot region of the sun’s atmosphere known as the corona. The $1.5 billion probe will sweep through the 2,400-degree-Fahrenheit corona 24 times over the course of its seven-year mission.

    Underground lake discovered on Mars


    In research published in July, scientists said they had discovered a lake under the frozen surface of Mars’ south pole. The subglacial lake’s water is thought to be salty as well as extremely cold, but the discovery is more evidence that life may have once existed on the Red Planet — or may still exist there.

    Boeing and SpaceX capsule astronauts named

    Ever since NASA retired its space shuttle program in 2011, astronauts have relied on Russian rockets and capsules to reach the International Space Station. But in August, NASA announced the names of nine astronauts who will fly to the space station in new capsules built by Boeing and SpaceX.

    For the first test flight of Boeing's CST-100 Starliner capsule, NASA picked Eric Boe, a veteran of two space shuttle missions; Nicole Aunapu Mann, who became an astronaut in 2013 and will be making her first trip to space; and Christopher Ferguson, who flew on three space shuttle missions before retiring from NASA in 2011 and joining Boeing's commercial space operations division.

    For the first test flight of SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule, NASA selected Robert Behnken and Douglas Hurley, each of whom made two space shuttle flights.

    For the first formal mission involving Boeing's CST-100 Starliner, NASA picked Sunita Williams, a former commander of the ISS who has spent 322 days in space, and Josh Cassada, who became an astronaut in 2013 and will be making his first trip to space.

    The first formal mission of SpaceX's Dragon capsule will be crewed by Michael Hopkins, who has spent 166 days aboard the space station, and Victor Glover, who was selected as an astronaut in 2013 and will be making his first spaceflight.
     
  2. JDragon

    JDragon DOX News Anchor Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    14,196
    Likes Received:
    18,056
    Location:
    Germany
    There is also a lot of thrilling stuff that we can expect to happen in 2019.

    • New Horizons probe fly-by of Ultima Thule (farthest object ever visited): right now, January 1st!
    • China landing with a rover on the far side of the moon: any time, Chang’e 4 is already in orbit. Chang’e 5 is then designed to be a sample return mission probably late this year or in 2020.
    • SpaceX will conduct its first unmanned Crew Dragon test flights on January 17th and, if successful, do a manned flight to the ISS in June.
    • An Israeli non-profit will launch a lunar lander aboard a Falcon 9 from Cape Canaveral sometime in Q1.
    • India will launch its second mission Chandrayaan-2, which includes a lunar robotic orbiter, rover, and lander.
    • A British start-up called OneWeb will launch the first 10 of 600 planned satellites at some point in February on an Arianespace Soyuz rocket from the Guiana Space Centre in French Guiana. The plan is to provide high-speed internet to every place on Earth.
    • On Feb 28, a Russian Soyuz rocket will bring NASA astronauts Nick Hague and Christina Koch and Russian cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin to the ISS to join the three folks already there.
    • In March, Boeing will conduct its maiden flight of the CST-100 that is supposed to dock with the ISS and get back. Assuming success, manned flights could happen in August.
    • The Falcon Heavy booster will return to space in March, with 25 individual payloads for the U.S. military and NASA, including weather satellites and a space radiation experiment.
    • In June, NASA astronaut Anne McClain, Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko will return to Earth.
    • It is expected that China will test a successor to its manned Shenzhou spacecraft in mid-2019. The reusable 20-ton spacecraft will launch aboard a Chinese Long March 5B rocket without a crew.
    • In July, there is the 50 year anniversary of the first moon landing.
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2019
  3. bushman505

    bushman505 Double Yellow Card Double Yellow Card

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2016
    Messages:
    11,891
    Likes Received:
    18,065
    Location:
    SW Alaska
    Space travel is fucking awesome.
     
    DLX, Krayd, Lowmanproblems and 23 others like this.
  4. ShinkanPo

    ShinkanPo I am done with Love I don't believe it.

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2011
    Messages:
    28,619
    Likes Received:
    18,523
    Location:
    Strange realm
    I am excited about Ultimate Tule

    I am waiting for the Images from N.Horisons to arived as off now the first transmitted data from space probe is still in transit as light takes 6 hours to travel from that distance
     
  5. JDragon

    JDragon DOX News Anchor Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    14,196
    Likes Received:
    18,056
    Location:
    Germany
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2019
    Lord Coke, NoDak and InternetHero like this.
  6. InternetHero

    InternetHero Titanium Belt

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2006
    Messages:
    36,675
    Likes Received:
    6,193
    Location:
    Tiger Mountain
    Liquid Smoke, Ornife and NoDak like this.
  7. bushman505

    bushman505 Double Yellow Card Double Yellow Card

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2016
    Messages:
    11,891
    Likes Received:
    18,065
    Location:
    SW Alaska

    That’s crazy man......have you tried DMT???
     
    ElKarlo likes this.
  8. ShinkanPo

    ShinkanPo I am done with Love I don't believe it.

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2011
    Messages:
    28,619
    Likes Received:
    18,523
    Location:
    Strange realm
    New Horizons space probe has made another historical milestone by its flyby of Ultima Thule. Making 2014MU69 the farthest object visited and I think in terms of photography the farthest distance where photographs were taken.

    I think it broke the previous record set when a Voyager probe took the photo of earth and the inner solar system in what later came to be known as the pale blue dot.
     
    superking, deviake, NoDak and 2 others like this.
  9. squeezewax

    squeezewax Black Belt

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2013
    Messages:
    5,227
    Likes Received:
    4,948
    Location:
    australia
  10. JDragon

    JDragon DOX News Anchor Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    14,196
    Likes Received:
    18,056
    Location:
    Germany
    Awesome. Brian May is just an awesome individual (astrophysicist and rock star), to think that they convinced him to do his first solo song in 20 years shows his love for the subject.

    I still get goosebumps when I think about 39 (the song) and what it is about.
     
  11. JDragon

    JDragon DOX News Anchor Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    14,196
    Likes Received:
    18,056
    Location:
    Germany
    ESA has shown with its Rosetta mission and the Philae lander that the Europeans are capable of kick-ass missions, too (even though the failure rate e.g. regarding Mars is much higher).

    Here is a brief (''kid friendly") intro to the BepiColombo mission to Mercury. It was launched in October 2018 and will reach Mercury in 2025.



    Here is a cool video of the preparation and launch:

     
    NoDak likes this.
  12. andnowweknow

    andnowweknow The Giant On Whose Shoulders You Stand

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2013
    Messages:
    13,896
    Likes Received:
    11,753
    Let's get a little more familiar with near earth objects. NASAs budget is a joke, but even within it spending only a few measly million bucks on detecting bolide objects that might enjoy a mid space accident with us is farcical.

    I wish NASA was in charge of the entire US budget. Cool with me:)
     
  13. ShinkanPo

    ShinkanPo I am done with Love I don't believe it.

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2011
    Messages:
    28,619
    Likes Received:
    18,523
    Location:
    Strange realm
    I was just browsing the web about the New Horizons mission and have seen the comments specially inflamatory ones saying how this is a media hype job because its been already 8 hours since the Thule closest approach and yet NSA hasn't release the photos yet.

    So manny angry people yet so ignorant.
     
  14. JDragon

    JDragon DOX News Anchor Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    14,196
    Likes Received:
    18,056
    Location:
    Germany
    Yet the answers are only a click away...

    New Horizons #UltimaThule Flyby Events (All Times Eastern)

    Tuesday, Jan. 1, 9:45 a.m.: New Horizons Signal Acquisition from Ultima Thule Flyby (All Channels)
    11:30 a.m.: New Horizons Post-Flyby Press Conference

    That means they won't even receive the signal until like half an hour from now.
     
    deviake and NoDak like this.
  15. TheComebackKid

    TheComebackKid Titanium Belt

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2007
    Messages:
    46,963
    Likes Received:
    18,496
    "Space"....
     
  16. JDragon

    JDragon DOX News Anchor Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    14,196
    Likes Received:
    18,056
    Location:
    Germany
    <PlusJuan>
    Reply ban imo
     
  17. NoDak

    NoDak Double Yellow Card Double Yellow Card

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2018
    Messages:
    8,887
    Likes Received:
    16,387
    Sloppy! You German or what, motherfucker? Shame on you. It sucks that it doesn't really fit any of the subject matter for the sub because it would be awesome to have a WR 'aerospace' thread with a central focus that encompasses earth science, planetary science, astrophysics, astronautics, space exploration and space technology. I would've already started one long ago, but Mayberry is just too goofy and childish.

    InSight is cool as hell, Mars 2020 will be even better.



    It has additional objectives for an Earth return sample mission. JPL is keeping the manufacturing in-house on this one; the planetary scientist Jim Bell who works at my university told me he's lined up to be the principal investigator for the Mastercam-Z instrument. He's also the author of this book on the Voyager mission.

    [​IMG]

    There are numerous achievements to its name that can't be done for the first time again. It was the first to observe volcanic activity on another world, the first and only mission to complete a 'grand tour' of the outer planets of the solar system, the first and only to directly explore Uranus (1986), first and only to explore Neptune (1989), first and only thus far to cross into and explore Interstellar Space (2012). From 1977-1989 alone, it had collected enough scientific data to fill 6,000 editions of Britannica Encyclopaedia.

    There are anthropomorphic qualities to it which aren't seen nor given to pretty much any other spacecraft ever launched, and they've been active for 40+ years now. That's predominantly due to the Golden Record and its encapsulation of humanity but also for things such as the family portrait of the solar system that served as the inspiration for Carl Sagan's "Pale Blue Dot" monologue set to Vangelis, just things that we'll never quite be able to duplicate again. It's also a virtual certainty that Voyager(s) will outlast human existence itself.

    Juno has been taking some wildly awesome shots.







    [​IMG]

    Of course you are, you would be, you awesome.

    [​IMG]

    Not sure if you've seen these when I posted them before, but it's a collection of only around 10,000+ unprocessed photos from the Apollo program, organized by mission and sorted by the rolls of film they were on.

    Project Apollo Archive

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG][​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  18. JDragon

    JDragon DOX News Anchor Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    14,196
    Likes Received:
    18,056
    Location:
    Germany
    Who says it doesn't fit? There are multiple angles that need political discussion:

    • Prioritization of budgets
    • Manned vs unmanned missions
    • Private vs public
    • Outer Space Treaty / Militarization of space
    • Strategic implications of space programs
    • Technology discussion (cross-over to aerospace)
    • Jobs
    • International cooperation (with Russia, ESA, etc.) especially considering the crazy lead time for these missions

    Also, many posters who want to discuss the topic post here rather than in the Mayberry, so...


    This was the original attempt btw but haven't updated in ages.
     
    SaiWa, deviake and Crazy Diamond like this.
  19. JDragon

    JDragon DOX News Anchor Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    14,196
    Likes Received:
    18,056
    Location:
    Germany
    One thing that we need to keep in mind as we now await pics from New Horizons from Ultima Thule.

    New Horizons was launched 13 years ago. It took that probe 13 years to get where it is now. But the initial idea was actually some 26 years ago. And people did not start working on it until like 17 years ago.

    This is why if space agencies like NASA or ESA do not receive proper funding now, we will see the negative impact (or non-impact) in and for many years to come.
     
  20. andnowweknow

    andnowweknow The Giant On Whose Shoulders You Stand

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2013
    Messages:
    13,896
    Likes Received:
    11,753
    The budget is a joke.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.