The G&E FAQ v2.0

Discussion in 'Gear & Equipment Discussion' started by Minowafanatic, Feb 18, 2013.

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  1. Minowafanatic Brown Belt

    Minowafanatic
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    Sherdog Gear & Equipment FAQ


    This FAQ serves to guide new practitioners of combat sports to the information they need for buying equipment. I've tried to eliminate as many specific product/brand references as possible to ensure it remains a neutral document.

    It's divided into several sections based on what kind of sport or martial art you'll be training in. If you're a grappler and can't find any information on what cup to wear in the relevant section, just check the contents page and you'll find it was already answered in the standup section. This was done to avoid needless repetition. If you're an MMA fighter then both the standup and grappling sections will be relevant to you.

    If you have any comments or suggestions for the FAQ then please PM me.



    ***Read this before making a thread***

    Read this thread and the resources found in the useful links section before making your own if you have a question. Use the search function if you're still out of luck. Now, the search function isn't perfect, it can't search for anything that is three letters or less and it often breaks, but you should always do a search before you post something new. Make sure you check google for relevant results as well.

    Should you be unable to find what you are looking for and feel like you need to start a new topic, please do yourself and everyone on the board a favor and be specific with your questions. Give as much detail as possible. For example, if you want to know what MMA gloves to get let us know what you'll be using them for, where you are in the world and what your price range is.

    SOLICITING THE SALE OF INDIVIDUAL GOODS IS PROHIBITED. Don't make threads advertising something for sale as it will be deleted and you will be cautioned. If you've just developed a new line of equipment then you can let us know about it, but the same doesn't apply for your ebay listing.



    Table of Contents

    Post 2: Standup Equipment
    - What do I need to get started?
    - What hand wraps should I get and how do I wear them?
    - Lace-up or velcro/hook&loop boxing gloves?
    - What's the difference between sparring gloves, training gloves and bag gloves?
    - Can I use one set of gloves for both sparring and the bags?
    - What weight boxing gloves should I get for sparring?
    - What weight boxing gloves should I get for bag and padwork?
    - How come some boxing gloves come in sizes?
    - Can competition gloves be used in training?
    - What's the difference between Muay Thai boxing gloves and regular ones?
    - What are Mexican style gloves?
    - What should I look for in shin guards?
    - What mouthguard should I get?
    - What's the best cup/no-foul protector?
    - What headguard is right for me?
    - Ankle supports...?
    - Boxing boots...?

    Post 3: Grappling Equipment
    - What do I need to get started?
    - What's the best gi?
    - BJJ gi vs. Judo gi.
    - What's the difference between weaves?
    - Where can I find a <insert color> gi?
    - What color gi should I get?
    - Can I dye my gi?
    - How should I wash my gi?
    - Rashguards, how do they work?
    - How should I wash my rashguard?
    - What's the difference between under armour and a rashguard?
    - What's the difference between a surfing rashguard and a grappling rashguard?
    - What's the best ear guard for wrestling?
    - Wrestling boots...?

    Post 4: MMA specific equipment
    - What MMA gloves do I need?
    - MMA bag gloves..?
    - What MMA competition gloves should I use?
    - What size MMA gloves do I need?
    - What shin guards are good for grappling?
    - Do I need MMA specific shorts?
    - What MMA shorts should I get?
    - What size MMA shorts am I?

    Post 5: Coaching and Gym Equipment
    - What are the different types of punching bag?
    - How do I mount my speed bag?
    - How do I mount my double end bag?
    - How should I hang my bag?
    - I can't hang my bag, what about free-standing bags?
    - How do I fill my heavy bag/maize bag?
    - Are water filled bags any good?
    - What about B.O.Bs?
    - What kind of focus mitts/hook&jab pads should I get?
    - What are a good pair of Thai pads?
    - Where can I get cheap mats?
    - Best jump rope?
    - What length should my jump rope be?
    - What kind of running shoes should I get?


    Useful/Interesting Threads


    This thread provides all the information you could ask for on Muay Thai shorts, shin guards and ankle support sizing.

    Building a MMA Gym
    Just completed my home gym!
    Gi Pants Sizing
    Title Boxing Official Thread
    Ringside Boxing Official Thread
    Mexican Boxing Equipment
    Post Your Gear!
     
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  2. Minowafanatic Brown Belt

    Minowafanatic
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    Standup Equipment

    **Rule of thumb: If it's an option, leather is better.


    Q: I'm about to start training in stand-up, what do I need?

    A: Keep in mind that most places have communal equipment and you&#8217;ll be fine showing up on your first day with appropriate clothing, a towel and some water. That said, your first purchase should be a pair of handwraps followed by your own gloves and shin guards (if you&#8217;re kicking). When you start sparring you&#8217;ll need a mouthguard, a cup or no-foul protector and headgear. Best to have a good pair of boxing boots if you start competing in that sport as well. Shorts and specific pieces of clothing is less important initially.

    Q: What handwraps should I get and how do I wear them?

    A: A good resource that explains how to wrap your hands can be found here. If in doubt don't be afraid to ask your trainer. Most people prefer elasticated or Mexican style handwraps and generally speaking the longer they are the better. Gel handwraps are frowned upon here in G&E as they cannot provide the same level of protection.

    Q: Lace-up or velcro/hook&loop boxing gloves?

    A: Laced gloves provide better wrist support but you'll need help to put them on unless you use elastic lock laces or tie them very loosely. Velcro gloves aren't as protective but you can put them on yourself. Hook&Loop converters can be purchased from some retailers in the US which will allow you to fit a velcro closure to any lace-up glove.

    Q: What's the difference between sparring gloves, training gloves, and bag gloves?

    A: These labels commonly describe their intended use. Gloves advertised as being sparring gloves may have padding that won't last as well on a heavy bag but will provide better protection for your sparring partner. Bag gloves are more densely padded for bag work and therefore shouldn't be used for sparring. Training gloves can typically be used for either. In practice though some gloves listed for sparring can make better bag gloves, and there are also training gloves which might be unsuitable for sparring.

    Q: Can I use one set of gloves for both sparring and the bags?

    A: It's not usually recommended. For a lot of gloves the padding will become denser and more compact with use on a heavy bag and therefore too hard for sparring purposes.

    Q: What weight boxing gloves should I get for sparring?

    A: Sparring gloves are typically 16oz although if you're under 140lbs you may be able to get away with 14oz, and similarly if you're well over 200lbs and a particularly heavy hitter than you might want to consider 18oz. Different gyms may have different accepted weights for sparring so it's best to check with your coach or partners to be sure. Heavier gloves soften the impact of your punches by virtue of having more padding, allowing you to spar at a higher intensity without endangering your partner.

    Q: What weight boxing gloves should I get for bag and padwork?

    A: Whilst 12oz is the norm, some people like heavier gloves for strength and conditioning purposes and the added protection, and others feel that a slightly smaller weighted glove is better for honing technique. People who use traditional, thumbless bag mitts subscribe to the latter theory. Keep in mind that heavier boxing gloves tend to have bigger hand compartments.

    Q: How come some boxing gloves come in sizes?

    A: Some bag gloves come in sizes rather than weights and this refers to the room in the hand compartment. Contest gloves commonly also provide a size option along with their weight. Many companies provide hand measurements for their sizes whilst others give a very rough guideline based on your weight. Most gloves that require a measurement in inches want you to measure around your knuckles with your palm flat. If you wear knuckle guards or lengthy handwraps then you should take this into consideration.

    Q: Can competition gloves be used in training?

    A: Many fighters use competition gloves for padwork in order to get accustomed to their weight and feel. The downside though is that they often break down more quickly than gloves designed for training purposes.

    Q: What's the difference between Muay Thai boxing gloves and regular boxing gloves?

    A: Thai gloves typically have shorter cuffs (although some prominent brands such as Top King, King and Boon don't) and more padding on the back of the hand for blocking kicks. They also open up well at the palm for clinchwork. Individually these traits are commonly shared by Western boxing gloves, and Muay Thai gloves can be used for traditional boxing without any problems and most of the time the reverse is true as well.

    Q: What are Mexican style gloves?

    This refers to the cut of the glove. Mexican gloves have more padding on the wrist and in other areas and less over the knuckles and a flatter striking surface. They typically have a more "sleek" appearance as a result and better wrist support.

    Q: What should I look for in shin guards?

    A: In general, the hook and loop closure is preferred over the various alternatives. Leather is preferred over synthetic. Shin guards run the gamut between too little cushioning and armor that will make it so you can't feel anything. Your shins need conditioning to be able to absorb the pain of kicking repeatedly so you don't want to use armor-like shin guards all the time. If you're sparring keep in mind how your opponent is going to feel.

    Q: What mouthguard should I get?

    A: If you're sparring regularly then this is not an area where you should go cheap. As with most things you get what you pay for, and custom mouthguards do usually provide much better protection than the boil 'n bite variety. It's a good idea to train with your mouthguard in to get accustomed to it fully.

    Q: What's the best cup/no-foul protector?

    A: Many swear by steel Thai cups. A lot of people also really like cups that fit in compression shorts. Steel cups provide a lot of protection but are also more triangular and have a flatter profile, and so may not be as comfortable as the alternatives.

    If you're boxing then you might want to look into a no-foul protector instead. These help protect not only your groin but can also cushion blows against your kidneys, hips and lower abs.

    Q: What headguard is right for me?

    A: Read this thread to get an idea of the different designs of headgear that is out there. Everything comes with a price. If you want the absolute best facial protection but can't afford the high end stuff you might end up with something heavy and uncomfortable. You need to find the balance between protection and fit/weight that's right for you. Many fighters train in the same headgear that they'll use in amateur competition. Remember as well that the primary purpose of a headguard is to prevent cuts/bruising and it will never cushion against all force.

    Also consider that headguards produced in Thailand tend to have stiff padding that lends itself well to cushioning the impact from elbows and knees, but not as well for punches.

    Q: Ankle supports...?

    A: Ankle supports are intended to keep your ankles warm to prevent injuries. Your foot has about a billion different bones, muscles, and tendons and it's extremely easy to injure it. Ankle supports will provide a moderate amount of protection against rolling and/or spraining your ankle, but that's not what they are intended to do.

    Q: Boxing boots...?

    A: Like with all shoes, especially athletic ones you should try before you buy. Whilst many run true to size, it is often the case that you'll need to order half a size up. Don't worry if they're a little tight at first. As with all shoes they'll break in with use. As for design, there is a trade-off between weight and ankle support in boxing boots. High-tops tend to be heavier but have greater support, and low-tops. Wrestling boots can also be used for boxing pretty effectively.

    This is also one of the only cases for gear in which leather holds no obvious advantages over other materials.
     
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  3. Minowafanatic Brown Belt

    Minowafanatic
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    Grappling Equipment


    Q: I'm about to start training, what do I need?

    A: Keep in mind that most places have communal equipment and you&#8217;ll be fine showing up on your first day with appropriate clothing, a towel and some water. That said, obviously getting a gi will be the first step if you're using a gi. After that a rashguard and possibly shorts too. This is in addition to a cup and mouthguard which has already been covered in the standup section of the FAQ.

    If you're wrestling, aside from the appropriate clothing you'll do well with a good pair of boots and an ear guard.

    Q: What's the best gi?

    A: As with anything else in G&E, to an extent you will get what you pay for. For the top tier brands there isn't one that is head and shoulders above the rest. For everyone that loves a brand there's somebody that hates them. The cut, sizing, thickness of lapel, etc. of each gi is different and what works for one person might not work for another.

    Q: BJJ gi vs. Judo gi..?

    A: BJJ gis typically have a slimmer cut. Judo gis are looser to make it easier to grab the label or the sleeve, something that you don't want in BJJ. It's more common for a Judo gi to be two piece than a BJJ gi.

    It completely depends on your instructor whether or not you'll be able to use a BJJ gi in a Judo class and vice versa. Some tournaments are very strict about what kind of gi you can wear, others aren't. In general, you probably aren't going to have much luck trying to get into a Judo tournament with a BJJ gi. Conversely, most BJJ players will gladly take advantage of the cut of your Judo gi in a BJJ tournament.

    Q: What's the difference between weaves?

    A: Durability, texture, and weight. A single weave gi will typically last a year or two of regular use, gold/platinum/hybrid weaves last two to three years of regular use, and a double weave gi will last basically forever. Double weaves are known for being very rough, other weaves are softer and smoother. Summer weaves are the lightest and breath the most, as the weave becomes fancier it becomes heavier and breaths less.

    Q: Where can I find a <insert color> gi?

    A: White and blue are standard colors for BJJ gis, most gi manufacturers produce gis in both these colors. Red and black are gaining popularity as well and there are a number of Japanese companies that make non-standard colors that are harder to purchase outside of Japan.

    Q: What color gi should I get?

    A: Some BJJ schools have rules about what color gis you are allowed to wear, so first, check with your instructor. If your instructor doesn't care, get whatever color you want. A lot of people new to BJJ are concerned that if they come to class wearing a fancy gi they'll be made fun of. If you are concerned about this, then go for a standard color. If you aren't, then who cares? Keep in mind, at tournaments most people sport white and blue, if you don't want to stick out stay with the standard.

    Q: Can I dye my gi?

    A: Sure, but you aren't going to get good results. If you're attempting to do this don't use RIT or similarly cheap and crappy grocery store dyes. You need a &#8220;fiber reactive&#8221; dye. Your best bet is to check out some art stores (even some arts and craft stores have this type of dye) if you want to buy it locally. Dharmatrading.com has a good walkthrough here. The big problem with dying a gi is the fact that the material is so thick. Dying a tshirt is easy because the fabric is completely saturated the second you put it in the tub, but a gi won't saturate nearly as fast and you'll end up with splotchy weirdness that isn't going to be pretty.

    Q: How should I wash my gi?

    A: However the manufacturer tells you to! Typically, it's best to wash your gi in cold water (by hand or in a machine) and air dry it. It takes a long time for a gi to dry, so don't be afraid to toss it in a dryer if you need to, just make sure it's on the lowest setting. You might even wash them in vinegar as some dyed gis aren't &#8220;mercerized&#8221; (the correct term) or &#8220;mercinized.&#8221; (a term that people use, but isn't actually what it's called). Basically, that means the gis haven't been treated to lock the dye into the fabric. Gis that haven't had the dye fixed typically let you know that you need to do this. If you buy a gi that asks you to wash it with vinegar then please do it.

    If your gi is stained, you should refrain from bleaching it as it weakens the fabric. Oxyclean, Shout, and other such products are pretty good at treating stains.

    Q: How do I shrink a gi?

    A: Wash it with hot water and dry it on a setting higher than the lowest setting. All gis, even pre-shrunk ones, will shrink a bit the first time (sometimes the first couple times) you wash them. Some shrink a very small amount, others will shrink a lot.

    Q: Rashguards, how do they work?

    A: There are three undeniable benefits to getting a rashguard: less mat burn, less of a chance of getting ring worm and other mat nastiness (if you're wearing a long sleeved rashguard that is), and the moisture wicking benefits of synthetic fiber. Most people experience an increase in stamina and enjoy training more when they aren't wearing a soaking wet, stretched out, cotton tshirt.

    As for short sleeves vs. long, this is mostly a matter of personal preference. Long sleeved rashguards will protect against mat burn better simply because your arms are covered. The fit is also a matter of personal preference, and some people prefer it tighter than others. Just make sure it isn't so loose as to get in the way of grappling.

    Q: How should I wash my rashguard?

    A: Check the label/manufacturer's website. At the very least, you should probably hand wash your rashguard with cold water after every use and line dry it. If your rashguard OK to put in a washer and dryer make sure you don't put anything with velcro on it in there at the same time.

    Q: What mouthguard should I get?

    A: If you're sparring regularly then this is not an area where you should go cheap. As with most things you get what you pay for, and custom mouthguards do usually provide much better protection than the boil 'n bite variety. It's a good idea to train with your mouthguard in to get accustomed to it fully.

    Q: What's the difference between Under Armour and a rashguard?

    A: Under Armour makes gear that is intended to be worn under athletic uniforms (under shoulder pads in American football, under jerseys, etc). While the fabrics they use are often similar to the fabrics used in grappling rashguards, they tend to pill up faster and the seams aren't as durable. Also, given the price of Under Armour, you aren't going to be saving any money by getting one of their products instead of a rashguard intended for grappling. If you decide to go with Under Armour, make sure you get their Heat Gear line of products and not their Cold Gear line.

    Q: What's the difference between a surfing rashguard and a grappling rashguard?

    A: In general, surfing rashguards are intended to keep your heat in, while grappling rashguards are intended to remove the heat from your body. Surfing rashguards are also made from fabric that feels less synthetic than most rashguards. Keep in mind, though, that a lot of MMA companies are merely slapping their brand name on surfing rashguards.

    Q: What's the best ear guard for grappling?

    A: There are a lot of options here, different strap configurations, different ways to cover the ears, etc. Most sporting good stores sell them (especially during wrestling season), it's advisable to go try them on and see what you like best.

    Q: Wrestling boots...?

    A: Like with all shoes, especially athletic ones, you should try before you buy. Whilst many run true to size, it is often the case that you'll need to order half a size up. Don't worry if they're a little tight at first. As with all shoes they'll break in with use.
     
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  4. Minowafanatic Brown Belt

    Minowafanatic
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    MMA Specific Equipment

    **Rule of thumb: If it's an option, leather is better.

    Q: What MMA gloves do I need?

    A: For general training and grappling drills you will want either a shooto-style glove which features over an inch of padding on the knuckles for added safety, or a general training style glove which also has more padding than the gloves used in competition. Only light sparring is advised when using MMA gloves and wherever possible boxing gloves should be used instead for greater safety.

    Q: MMA bag gloves..?

    A: If doing bagwork with any power behind your punches most people advise that you avoid using MMA gloves as they do not provide enough protection. As an alternative you might want to consider thumbless bag mitts or regular boxing gloves.

    Q: What MMA competition gloves should I use?

    A: Most MMA organizations are pretty specific about what kind of gloves you are allowed to compete it. Check out what they want you to use. 4oz is usually the standard though.

    Q: What size MMA gloves do I need?

    A: Most gloves with sizes will require a measurement in inches of the circumference around your knuckles with your palm flat. Some gloves may have different measurement standards or may just base the measurement on your height and/or weight. It is best to contact the manufacturer if you're unsure.

    Q: What shin guards should I use for grappling?

    A: You should pick a pair of grappling shin guards which are designed to be more lightweight specifically for grappling. They provide a lot less protection than shin guards that you'd use to train pure stand-up simply because they have a lot less padding as a trade-off. Also, metal buckles should be avoided.

    Q: Do I need MMA specific shorts?

    A: Unless you're broke it may be a good idea to cough up the dough. MMA Shorts are typically light in weight, yet durable in construction in terms of the stitching and materials used. Often made from a polyester / cotton composite material, MMA shorts are designed to be quick drying and quickly wick away moisture.

    Q: What MMA shorts should I get?

    A: Don't get a pair of shorts with an external draw string and don't get a pair of shorts with open pockets. Apart from that, everyone is looking for something different in a pair of shorts. Shorts are made from dozens of different fabrics, with different closure methods, different cuts, and with incredibly different looks, styles and features.

    Q: What size MMA shorts am I?

    A: Keep in mind that if the shorts have an elastic waist band and a drawstring you have more flexibility in terms of sizing. The same can be said of value tudo shorts which which are typically made of very stretchy fabric. Most of the time you should order your pants size or measure where you want your shorts to sit, but be sure to consult a sizing chart or contact the manufacturer if you have any doubts.
     
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  5. Minowafanatic Brown Belt

    Minowafanatic
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    Coaching and Gym Equipment

    **Rule of thumb: If it's an option, leather is better.

    Q: What are the different types of punching bag?

    A: Punching bags are mostly all variants of the speed bag, double end bag, maize bag, and the common heavy bag.

    Speed bags are small, air-filled bags anchored at the top to a rebound platform parallel to the ground. They help a fighter build timing, accuracy, and endurance. Beginners should start out with bigger bags and then get smaller ones as skill level increases, although a bigger bag requires greater force to keep it going and may be of more interest to someone just looking to keep fit. It's also helpful for beginners to not inflate the bag all the way, as the more air it has in it the faster it moves

    Double end bags can be similar to speed bags in that they are also air-filled although the size and material is usually different, but the cable system is attached not just to the ceiling but also has a clip on the floor - when the fighter places any motion on the ball, it tightly reacts by swinging fast towards them. The object is to swerve, punch, dodge and learn co-ordination. The harder and faster they are hit - the more they rebound and react in different angles, thus giving greater practice to the fighter.

    Maize bags, as the name would suggest, are traditionally filled with maize or a suitable substitute. They can vary greatly in size, and the smaller options are often refered to as a slip bag instead, and the larger options a teardrop bag. They hang from the ceiling at head height and are used to practice head movement, uppercuts and knees.

    A heavy bag is a larger, cylindrical bag, usually suspended by chains or ropes. Again these can vary in weight and shape but the average will be around 70-100lbs. Thai bags tend to be longer and skinnier, and there are also uppercut bags with a segmented middle that allow for..uppercuts to be thrown.

    Q: How do I mount my speed bag?

    A: The easiest way to do it is to get a &#8220;speed bag platform&#8221; or &#8220;speed bag drum.&#8221; They might seem pricey, but they include all the hardware you need (the mounting apparatus and the swivel) and are worth the investment.

    Q: How do I mount my double end bag?

    A: Traditionally, an eyebolt in the ceiling and one in the floor. A cheaper way to attach it to the floor is to hook it to a dumbell.

    Q: How should I hang my bag?

    A: Very carefully. Some people hang their bags from pull-up bars... Most sites that sell bags also sell the equipment for mounting them. You're probably going to want a product that typically gets called a &#8220;beam hanger&#8221; or &#8220;beam mount&#8221; and a &#8220;chain and swivel.&#8221; You can come up with your own homebrew concoctions, but these normally sell for a relatively small amount and are definitely worth investing in.

    Q: I can't hang my bag, what about free-standing bags?

    A: Free standing bags are poor. If you can't hang out bag from the ceiling, check out a weighted bag stand. They are pricey, but they are a lot cheaper and safer than blowing money on a useless free standing bag or ripping out your ceiling.

    Q: How do I fill my heavy bag/maize bag?

    A: Most pre-filled bags are rag filled with a fancy hydraulic machine. You will never be able to fill a bag by hand like the machine does it. People that buy unfilled bags use rags (old sheets, shirts, etc) and sand. Keep in mind that all bags eventually go soft in places and that bags that aren't professionally filled tend to go soft faster.

    Q: Are water filled bags any good?

    A: Yes, if you want a couple dozen gallons of water all over your floor, or have the discipline to pull all of your punches.

    Q: What about B.O.Bs?

    A: Body opponent bags can be useful for certain things, but are definitely not to be considered as an alternative to a punching bag as they cannot take anywhere near the same amount of force without toppling over. Use them wisely in clinching drills or just any kind of lighter, more technical work that you want to do.

    Q: What kind of focus mitts/hook&jab pads should I get?

    A: You have the curved focus mitts, flat focus mitts, air mitts and micro-mitts. In Europe these may be called hook & jab pads instead.

    Flat focus mitts are generally better for beginners as they have a larger contact area and so it's easier to be land accurately (this applies to both the holder and the fighter). Curved focus mitts are curved inwards with a padded ball at the palm, and usually provide greater hand protection and comfort. Micro-mitts are the smallest option and are less-padded so as to be as a lightweight as possible, training the accuracy of the fighter. Air mitts are the most thickly padded of focus mitts and provide the greatest hand protection for the holder but may not provide the same kind of feedback for the fighter.

    Q: What are a good pair of Thai pads?

    A: Most people prefer Thai pads that have a &#8220;hook and loop&#8221; closure although some come with normal velcro closures and some with a buckle. Thai pads come in a variety of lengths, thicknesses, and weights. Take your arm length into consideration (particularly if your elbow is going to be covered), how hard the people who will be kicking these pads can kick, and how long you'll be able to hold them up for if they are heavy.

    Q: Where can I get cheap mats?

    A: Used wrestling mats are probably the cheapest mats you can get, but they aren't easy to find... they also likely have all sorts of lovely bonus gifts like ring worm and herpes! A lot of people find the .75&#8221; puzzle mats that are sold at Walmart and try using those, which might be OK for stand-up training but it definitely not recommended for grappling. Good mats aren't cheap.

    Q: Best jump rope?

    A: Depends on what you're looking for. If you're just using it to warm up, most any jump rope should be fine, vinyl, beaded, leather, or coated wire. If you want to get a workout, check out a plastic tubing Thai rope or one of the various weighted ropes (weighted handles or a jump rope where the rope itself is weighted). If you're looking for speed, a coated wire rope is what you want.

    Q: What length should my jump rope be?

    A: If you're just starting out a longer rope is what you're looking for. Measure the rope by standing on the middle of it and pulling the handles up by your sides, the handles should land somewhere between the middle of your rib cage and your armpits. As you get better and more coordinated you should shorten your rope to make the revolutions smaller and faster, forcing you to be more accurate with your timing. World champion speed jumpers have their rope just above their hips.

    Q: What kind of running shoes should I get?

    A: Like ALL shoes, it's safest to try before you buy! All the fancy specs in the world don't matter if they don't feel good. It's often advised you go to your local running store and get a gait analysis done by one of the employees, and buy from a store with a good returns policy in case they don't turn out to be for you after more extensive use.
     
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