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Some questions about muay thai

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by HMCfan, May 28, 2009.

  1. HMCfan White Belt

    HMCfan
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    What's up guys. I'm a judoka looking to do some muay thai on the side. So I got some questions.

    I saw some video clips where some muay thai fighters got their leg snapped in half like a twig. I can't help but admit that that is some scary ass shit. Are broken legs or other horrifying injuries common in muay thai? Or rare, freak occurences?

    I heard striking is a bit easier to get good at compared to grappling. I'll give an arbitrary numbers.. say like two years. If I did muay thai for two years as a hobby could I become a "proficient" striker and a decent competitor? I'm 20 right now. I'm a bit anxious to get good quickly since I feel like 20 yrs old is kinda late age to start. Is it?

    Judo is a hobby that you can do into old age. Is muay thai too rough to have as a life-long hobby?
     
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  2. nefti Black Belt

    nefti
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    Leg breaks are extremely rare. Heck i think that judokas break their arms more often fromd efending the ippon than muay thai leg breaks.

    Striking takes alot more natural talent and ability than "grappling" (in the bjj sense). And What's decent anyway?
     
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  3. Znap Yellow Belt

    Znap
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    Broken legs aren't common. Usually only seen in some of the more experienced and harder hitting fighters, that don't use shinguards also, very rare.

    As for becoming good at striking, I've been doing muay thai for around 2 years, started training more seriously about 8 months ago and I've had two fights and two wins, not that really says anything about my striking.
     
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  4. HMCfan White Belt

    HMCfan
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    Be pretty good in amateur MT fights/comps. and have no problem outstriking average person in street self-def
     
    #4
  5. Borb Yellow Belt

    Borb
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    As long as you train properly you could probably (And assuming you and the person you're fighting of are average to above average strength) "out strike" most people within the first 3 months of training.
    You'd be amazed at how few people know how to actually throw a punch (The proper stance, twisting of the hips, straight back/curved back, etc.)
     
    #5
  6. HMCfan White Belt

    HMCfan
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    I also want to compete in muay thai too though. Become a good amateur-lvl kickboxer. So I'm wondering if I can get to this level by my mid-twenties since that is like the athletic prime for most males. I'm twenty yrs old now.

    I'm also looking to combine judo and muay thai so that I'll be well-rouded enough where I'll be able to take care of myself during exchanes or grappling.

    I wanna be "good" while I'm still young, you know?
     
    #6
  7. Keerin Blue Belt

    Keerin
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    I thought 30's was prime condition for males?
     
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  8. nefti Black Belt

    nefti
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    if you are a pro athelete.
     
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  9. bmuay White Belt

    bmuay
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    It is possible to be decent by your mid twenties but I would say that you have a lot of work ahead of you. You also need to make sure that you learn from good instructors/have a good school. If you don't get good instruction you might as well kiss your dreams good bye. If you train right, you can train MT for many many years! Good luck.
     
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  10. ssullivan80 see....what had happened was

    ssullivan80
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    Broken legs and broken bones in general are going to be more common in Judo than Muay Thai, as far as training is concerned.

    As for how long it will take to become "proficient", it is contingent upon the athlete and the training, not so much the time. 2yrs could be enough time for some guys to fight professionally (if they are gifted). In the same respect I have seen guys who have trained for 2yrs and still lack the basic fundamentals. Same applies to age, it really has more to do with your physical condition and ability than your age. Being younger will buy you more time, that's it! P.S: 20yrs old is very young! you got plenty of time. How long you can continue training depends on how in shape and injury free you stay!

    Also, your judo will translate really well into MT. I train MT with a couple of Judoka's, they are by far the most difficult guys to work in the clinch with. Thank god it's MT and they cant uchi mata toss my ass on the mat!
     
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  11. Pro Killer Black Belt

    Pro Killer
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    30+ Is the athletic prime, He doesnt know what he's talking about,
    And no your not too old!
     
    #11
  12. Kuffe Yellow Belt

    Kuffe
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    Leg breaks are extremely rare, I've done MT for 2 years and I've never been seriously injured, nor has anyone from my gym.

    20 is not too old to start, alot of people start in their twenties. With 2 years of hard training you should be more than ready to compete at a amateur lever, by the time you reach your physical prime you'll have around 8-12 years of experience.
     
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  13. Marvin Covar Amateur Fighter

    Marvin Covar
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    There's no set time before you become proficient, it depends on the person. Mastering the basics and sparring a lot when you're ready helps.
     
    #13
  14. PreludeMTL Green Belt

    PreludeMTL
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    I also wish I took Muay Thai earlier in my life...

    You're 20, you have lots of time, especially if you are take it multiple times a week, you can progress very quickly if it comes naturally to you.

    I'm 31 (look 25) and apprently I am progressing at a very good rate. I've only been taking private instruction instead of being in a large class which I believe really has helped me progress quickly and do the right things from day one...

    So you have lots of time my friend...congrats on starting early
     
    #14
  15. thirteen Brown Belt

    thirteen
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    No. It's just different to get good at.
    And don't let the fear of leg-damage deter you from starting.
    (And it's not like Judo sparing + comps are exactly easy on the body lol).
    Good luck!
     
    #15
  16. pailum117 Blue Belt

    pailum117
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    Again it depends on you. If your idea of MT training is training with your buddies in a back yard, then it doesn't matter how long you train you'll probably never be ready for competition. If you go to a good gym with good trainers, (atleast 5x per week) and get a heavy bag and bang away for atleast 45min per day, then you should be quite formidable in the amerature devision after two years (assuming extra conditioning time). I don't know your circumstanes, but I think the absolute best decision one can make is to go to a camp in Thailand for 1.5 or 2 months. Do the math 6 hours of Muay Thai per day, 5 days per week for 8 weeks= 240 hours of top level training. If you want to get real proficent, real quick that's probably the way to go.
     
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