Protein in a vegetarian diet (I'm a newb, help plz)

Discussion in 'Dieting / Supplement Discussion' started by HUNTERMANIA, May 8, 2017.

  1. HUNTERMANIA

    HUNTERMANIA "I felt it." Platinum Member

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    Any vegetarians in here? I'm gonna be starting soon and I have no idea about anything. Any sources or links would be appreciated. Thanks!


    I know I love eating fruit and vegetables, so whatever, I just need to know what the main things I need to get since I won't be eating meat.
     
  2. nastyElbows also avirgin

    nastyElbows also avirgin Orange Belt

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    according to last time i googled about that: you can find protein in:

    nuts/peanuts + whole grain bread = complete protein
    eggs = complete protein
    milk
    yogurt
    black beans + quinoa = complete protein
    chickpeas
    i guess cottage cheese = complete protein. it's also low in calories compared to nuts etc
     
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  3. bigkick

    bigkick Brown Belt

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    I've been vegetarian since 1992. The switch over was a bit difficult because I didn't cook much for myself yet. So I ate a lot of salads full of beans, nuts, and cheese. And bread with cheese. And more cheese. Haha. But you figure it out. Beans, nuts, dairy if you do that, eggs if you do them, tofu/tempeh (try to stay away from the highly processed mock meat stuff like veggie burgers, though). You don't have to worry about the mixing of foods to get complete proteins. That was incorrect information put forth in a popular book (Diet For A Small Planet) that somehow came to be regarded as a truth.
     
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  4. Contempt

    Contempt black belt in couch-fu

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    Meat.

    Don't be a pussy.
     
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  5. Leonard Haid

    Leonard Haid Minimalist Living the Illusory Dream

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    If you're going to be vegetarian but not vegan you can still eat eggs, which are loaded with protein. As are dairy foods. If you're going to be vegan, the highest protein foods are tofu, beans, lentils, nuts, and seeds. There are also delicious vegan protein powders on the market. Mix them with soy milk or nut milk in the morning. When you shake it up in the milk it makes a delicious "milkshake". Other high-protein foods to consider are tempeh, edamame, peas, quinoa, and peanut butter. Veggies that are high in protein (compared to other veggies) are spinach, kale, broccoli, brussels sprouts, corn, and especially sprouts. Mushrooms have some, and my wife believes that if you eat 3 different kinds of mushrooms at the same time that creates a synergistic protein explosion, or something like that. Not sure if that's true, but it can't hurt, and mushrooms are delicious. Oats also are an OK source of protein.
     
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  6. HUNTERMANIA

    HUNTERMANIA "I felt it." Platinum Member

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    Thanks !!!

    Right now literally all I have are avocados, apples, bananas, eggs, yogurt, and chia seeds and hemp seeds.

    Nothing else to eat, at all, lol. Fortunately I do drink a protein supplement every day. But I threw out all my meat and it was like all my food. I have a lot to learn but I'm ready :)
     
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  7. deviake

    deviake The Next Phase

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    Beans, lentils, quinoa, nuts, tempeh, tofu (though don't overdo it with soy), oats are a decent source, and even bread has a solid amount. The aforementioned veggies as well - there's a surprising amount of foods that are decent to good sources of brotein.

    As someone before said, don't worry about getting "complete" brotein.

    Also, a big thing that I didn't do at first - make sure you eat enough. You're going to need to eat more and more often as plant foods burn off pretty quick and aren't as calorie dense as meat.
     
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  8. HUNTERMANIA

    HUNTERMANIA "I felt it." Platinum Member

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    It's funny you mention that because I'm actually eating a lot less now (I think, I haven't been adding up calories, but it feels like less for sure - I'm used to eating big meals at once and now I'm eating big salads which I feel are way less calories). I'm kind of torn bc I could probably lose 10lbs or so and that be a good thing, but I'm still trying to put on muscle (and I've been doing that, I've been trying to gain weight for a while), so I'm like uhh.. lol. I bought a carb/calorie heavy supplement today to use for another month or so to help me out until I have this down. I'm definitely looking forward to my veggie 6-pack tho :)
     
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  9. deviake

    deviake The Next Phase

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    Sounds like you're doing things right. I think it's a good idea to keep track of your calories, particularly at the start. I wasn't super well researched and I mainly ate nuts, eggs, beans, and salad at the start but didn't eat enough so I felt weak and fell off. I did more research later and gave it another go, eating much more, then went vegan after 8-9 months-ish.

    Good luck! As long as you keep reading up on it you should be fine. I highly recommend taking a B12 supplement. A lot of people are B12 deficient, and it's more prevalent among vegetarians and vegans.
     
  10. MandirigmaFit

    MandirigmaFit Blue Belt

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    ^Same with iron.
     
  11. steve38

    steve38 Black Belt

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  12. Badger67

    Badger67 Taxidea taxus

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    Iron skillets help with acquiring Heme-Iron so hopefully he buys one of those.
     
  13. MandirigmaFit

    MandirigmaFit Blue Belt

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    Preferably two. Well-seasoned.
     
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  14. BryanTheFighter

    BryanTheFighter Double Yellow Card Double Yellow Card Yellow Card Banned

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  15. BryanTheFighter

    BryanTheFighter Double Yellow Card Double Yellow Card Yellow Card Banned

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  16. BryanTheFighter

    BryanTheFighter Double Yellow Card Double Yellow Card Yellow Card Banned

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  17. BryanTheFighter

    BryanTheFighter Double Yellow Card Double Yellow Card Yellow Card Banned

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  18. rolly czar

    rolly czar White Belt

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    Right now, North American experts recommend 0.8 grams per 1 kilogram of body weight (1 kilogram equals approximately 2.2 pounds). For the average adult, this would translate to about 50 to 60 grams a day, or 10% of our daily caloric intake.
    All plant foods contain protein in them. Some plant foods contain just a trace amount while others have an abundance. Protein is comprised of amino acids, eight of which are not created by the human body. These eight “essential” amino acids, therefore, must come from our food, and they can easily be obtained from a wholesome, varied vegetarian diet. Examples include dhal with rice and veggies, nut butter on whole grain bread, muesli or cereal with milk or yogurt, cheese with healthy crackers, and black beans with tortilla and salad. Tempeh, tofu, sprouts, amaranth, quinoa, broccoli, collard greens, and shiitake and oyster mushrooms are also excellent sources, with a range of 10% to 50% protein—well over the 10% recommended by the FDA.
     
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  19. rolly czar

    rolly czar White Belt

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    awesome pic
     
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