I heard the adage "never throw just one punch" but how much is too much

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by MadSquabbles500, Jun 13, 2018.

  1. MadSquabbles500

    MadSquabbles500 Gold Belt

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    I have heard the adage "never throw just one punch" but how much is too much?

    If you see an opening, and you go for it, dont just throw one punch, try to follow up. However there must be a point when you over do it. What is that point?
     
  2. Reyesnuthugr

    Reyesnuthugr Dominick Reyes Belt

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    Overdo like throwing too many punches? If they're blocking or evading really well and you're not landing real damage, you're going to tire yourself out quickly and then they can retaliate effectively.

    Also if you're getting out of position or getting into a bad position (when they evade or slip), time to stop before you get countered hard/KO'ed. Depending on the exact situation it might be time to start blocking yourself and/or getting out of that position with your feet
     
  3. Sinister

    Sinister Doctor of Doom Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    Sooner or later most people sacrifice defense for punch. Or positioning for punch. If you do either of those, you stand a very good chance of getting knocked out. I remember when I was a kid I had a neighbor who would get drunk on Sundays and do yardwork (he had a hot wife he could have been inside banging, but hey...let's lay down some mulch!). One time after he finished he asked me how it looked, and it looked fine except for the empty beer bottles every 3-4 feet. Our other neighbor said: "Yeah Dave works in circles. He works hard all day and doesn't get shit done."

    A lot of fighters work in circles. They work very hard to do something that doesn't accomplish their goal. When they do this they leave openings themselves and can be unprepared to handle the response. A good example of this in boxing was Bert Cooper against Michael Moorer, round 1:



    Juan Manuel Marquez also had a habit of knocking out people who knocked him DOWN, and tried to go for the kill. I remember telling my students that if I ever trained anyone to fight Marquez I would say DON'T knock him down, statistically you almost guarantee you'll be knocked out by him. Unless you're Floyd Mayweather Jr. or Manny Pacquiao. And don't go right to him and force a fight. In fact, do as little as possible. Tim Bradley "beat" him that way.
     
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  4. never enough

    never enough Colour my life with the Chaos of trouble

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    I think thats why is gassing out so quickly sparring, I seem to always throw 3-4 punch combos.
    I need to pick my shots more and use my jab more effectively
     
  5. Frode Falch

    Frode Falch Gold Belt Professional Fighter

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    I like single shots on the outside. But in order to make it work, you need something more. Like a feint, a counter, or setting him up with footwork / angles.

    On the inside i like long combinations.
     
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  6. AndyMaBobs

    AndyMaBobs Purple Belt

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    I remember Marquez seemed to brawl until he got hit with a good punch then he sort of remembered he was a counter puncher and would be disciplined from then on
     
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  7. dudeguyman

    dudeguyman Kosen Ju-Jitsu

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    When the opportunity disappears.
     
  8. Sinister

    Sinister Doctor of Doom Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    That's part of it, but there's something else. He comes into more mental focus after he's been knocked down. Floyd was asked why he didn't go for the kill when he knocked JMM down and he replied: "I did." That prompted me to re-watch that fight, he knocks Marquez down and then tries to pressure him in his own way, that's when he gets hit. Kinda similar to Neo in The Matrix and how in the first flick he didn't awaken until he was killed. Before that he was dangerous, but containable. They actually fucked up by killing him, he would have been less of a threat if they just left him alone.

    That's JMM in a nutshell.
     
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  9. spacetime

    spacetime Black Belt

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    Lennox Lewis was another fighter you shouldn't try to maul down. He goes on the ropes takes your best shots, then dishes it back. He had a street mentality in the ring and could easily be tempted into slugging it back. And damn the consequences
     

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