How effective is shotokan?

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by CanadianLegKick, Dec 11, 2010.

  1. CanadianLegKick White Belt

    CanadianLegKick
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    This is my first thread, so if theres already been one like this, sorry. Okay, well I have some wrestling experience, and im currently at orange belt in judo. My family is moving to some town with the only martial art being shotokan karate. Ive done another martial art for a bit (Dahn Moo Do) its kinda like hapkido. So, im wondering if its even worth it getting into shotokan?

    thanks
     
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  2. MayanFighter White Belt

    MayanFighter
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    I'm in the same boat as you mate.

    *First of all... What your goals are? Blackbelt? MMA training? Self defense?

    1).- Hell Yeah! Shotokan is good for self defense and learning stand up fighting.
    2).- If you have an Orange belt in Judo, probably you should continue with that too
    3).- Take a sample class, or watch some videos about this style of Karate, and see if you like it.

    P.s. If you practiced, or watched Taekwondo trainings, you might see similarities at the begining. I've taken both, but never got to the Blackbelt, i will get back there when i'm done with Muay Thai. Good luck!
     
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  3. DS614 Brown Belt

    DS614
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    Your question is wrong. Shotokan is a style, if Lebron James practiced Shotokan from the age of 5 he could destroy whole rooms of people like a Jet Li movie.

    You should be asking about the instructor there, not the style. Would you learn Shotokan karate from the Machida's?? I would in a heartbeat.
     
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  4. LEGS MAHONEY genetically modified man shark

    LEGS MAHONEY
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    It's as only as good as the person who is teaching it and the guy who's practicing it.
     
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  5. Xian Banned

    Xian
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    I assume the guy means effective in MMA, which I would like to know also, although have a feeling its not so effective from what I've read on here.

    If you want to get into action moves however, Jean Claude Van Damme and Wesley Snipes both learned it and it seems awesome against hordes of useless hencemen as you work your way to the boss.
     
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  6. LEGS MAHONEY genetically modified man shark

    LEGS MAHONEY
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    I think it would be wise to form an opinion based off of first hand experience rather than what one reads here. Usually people will just (coincidentally of course:icon_lol:) harp on whatever they practice as being teh bestest ever and rag on whatever isn't hip at the moment.

    Find a good teacher, learn it, cross train at an mma gym see how it works for you. Its the only way to get a definitive answer.
     
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  7. CanadianLegKick White Belt

    CanadianLegKick
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    Yea, Im talking about effectiveness in MMA. I have experience in that Dahn Moo Do art which I heard is similar to karate sparring (point sparring). I found it to be kind of useless. The only thing that I got out of it was proper form for kicks, and got better at countering.

    And on your number 2, you said to continue judo, but when I move there is only going to be karate.
     
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    Last edited: Dec 11, 2010
  8. td82394 Brown Belt

    td82394
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    It's as effective as the person using it, just like any martial art. However, on a side note, if this is for MMA, you may want to consider cross training in the big 4 (boxing, mt, wrestling, & bjj) along with karate. If this is for teh streets, you may want to consider taking up track.
     
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  9. CanadianLegKick White Belt

    CanadianLegKick
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    I would love to cross train, the only problem is that my family moves alot. I havent really lived anywhere long enough to get a solid base going. I have around 2 years of wrestling, Ive done about a year of submission grappling. I have a yellow belt in a striking based martial art, and a orange belt in Judo. Once i move out and go to uni/college then im definately going to join an mma gym. The problem is, the only thing Im going to have available is shotokan karate. But, I guess some karate wouldnt hurt, its hell of a lot better than noting
     
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  10. Doughbelly αlpha-nerd, action scientist

    Doughbelly
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    I don't know what your situation is but my as a military kid, I moved every 9 mos - 2 years.

    This kind of situation can work to your advantage if you have good, strong guidance from well experienced people. I suggest you sit down and talk about your goals with an older person you trust and respect - brother, uncle, father, cousin, friend of the family, teacher, coach, whomever - and see if this is a worthwhile option for you.

    Your other option if you're moving out to the sticks is to just work on your general fitness and/or a team sport. I've trained/coached college/university clubs before and taken first year students to national levels in more than one discipline. In general, I'd prefer a generally fit and flexible novice with good hand-eye coordination and who knows how to take a hit (football/hockey) than someone with 1-2 years of no-contact experience.
     
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  11. mjw1 Blue Belt

    mjw1
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    If it is what is by you and you want to still train I say check it out....
     
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  12. chaospfa Blue Belt

    chaospfa
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    My opinion might be a little biased on the subject, but I say go for it. The majority of the guys at my dojo compete in kickboxing and a good number of the top competitors in kickboxing in SA also train shotokan. If you decide to take karate get yourself 2 sets of headgear, 2 sets of sparring gloves, 2 sets of shin guards and ask around the dojo if anyone wants to spar, maybe you get lucky and get someone that has previous kickboxing/boxing experience. Read up on the internet on boxing/kickboxing strategies (proper guard, footwork etc) and work your cardio alot, jog every day, get yourself a heavy bag. When you feel confident and fit enough check out for kickboxing tournies in your area, see if you can get your sensei or a sempai and some other students into it too. It would be best to enter light contact or semi full contact (full contact to the body, light to the face) division first and when you feel comfortable enough to move up to K-1 and MT rules.
    EDIT: beware of McDojos, if this school turns out to be one, you are shit out of luck.
     
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  13. KBE6EKCTAH_CCP Arrow sash belt with Lederhosen

    KBE6EKCTAH_CCP
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    well if you want to do martial arts, and shotokan is all there is, then shotokan it is, isn't it ?
     
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  14. M@sato Green Belt

    M@sato
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    I did Shotokan for 12 years, have found it very useful, especially whilst transitioning into other martial arts. As others have said it depends on the instructor mainly, it will have its uses in an MMA environment (Vitor Belfort is currently training it), but by itself it's obviously not enough. You already have a wrestling background, and some Judo too, adding Karate wouldn't hurt. At worst (Mcdojo'ish) it'll help keep you in shape, and give you some core strength training + good form in your kicks.
     
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  15. SpineBreaker Orange Belt

    SpineBreaker
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    It can't be said enough that the quality of the instruction is what matters, not the style.

    I like to think Shotokan teaches you a pretty damn good way of fighting, assuming you get realistic and honest training. I mean, my sensei demonstrates techniques on me sometimes, never with much power, and sometimes it still hurts. I'm sure I'm learning how to hurt people pretty good, if I ever have to.

    You just have to go check it out. But be honest with yourself.

    I should also say that, assuming your Shotokan place is really good, you don't need to worry too much about other styles. Anything worth your time in the martial arts should be worth a LOT of your time. You'll need it if you want to get better. Look at Lyoto Machida. I really think his Shotokan could be better, yet he's still skilled enough to not really ever need his other styles to help him. He rarely goes to the ground because of his Shotokan training.
     
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    Last edited: Dec 12, 2010
  16. CanadianLegKick White Belt

    CanadianLegKick
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    so yea, I found out that it's a school that focuses on kata only, and usually only spar like once every 2-3 months. I'm a competive person, so I guess all I have is getting a gym membership and getting in shape for when I acutually move somewhere with a mma gym/ whatever
     
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