Heel Pain When Flexing Foot Toward Shin

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by SeventySeven, Aug 4, 2016.

  1. SeventySeven Blue Belt

    SeventySeven
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    I've had a bit of a pain in my heel over the last several weeks. It seemed to come about after I bumped my knee into a table and felt a sprain from it at the knee joint, where it was difficult to walk on for a few days.

    The problem is, ever since then... every time I go to stretch my calf (pulling toes toward my shin), I get a sharp stinging/burning/numbness just in my heel on the one side. I've tried googling around a bit, but the common ones don't seem to match my description. I don't know if the knee banging had anything to do with it, or if that was coincidental.

    Has anyone encountered this? Any ideas?

    These are the sorts of stretches that cause the stinging:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  2. bad seed full kit wanker

    bad seed
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    first of all you need to isolate the exact source of pain. Is it your heel bone or achilles tendon?
     
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  3. MastiffMike Blue Belt

    MastiffMike
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    You've got the plantar fasciitis. Hopefully you only lose the leg from mid thigh down, but if not, good knowing you.
     
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  4. Sano Brown Belt

    Sano
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    Sounds like either plantar fascilitis or achilles tendon enthesopathy. If the pain is more under your foot it's more likely plantar fascilitis, if it's more just above your heel, it's more likely achilles enthesopathy. It doesn't HAVE to be either of those things, but it's likely. Try stretching your calf a little and feel down the achilles tendon and on the top of the heel, is the pain there? Is it under the foot/heel?

    Regarding you bumping your knee, I don't think it has any direct correlation, BUT, if you've had difficulty walking for a few days you've probably compensated your walking pattern and loaded your foot more than you would normally. That could have been the triggering factor. Both conditions are usually either overuse injuries and/or a result of a sedentary lifestyle + being overweight.

    They are inflammatory, so what you want to do is rest up for a little while. Let it calm down. At the same time, if it's achilles tendon enthesopathy, or tendonitis, it could be your calf muscles are a little shortened. Try doing a little warmup calf raises/heel lifts exercise on both feet while standing. Smoothly through the motion. Then stand against a wall, and rock into a gentle calf stretch and sit in it for a long time. Do that a few times a day. If you're overweight, try to lose a little.

    Otherwise, you should rest it. No running, no jumping, no explosive calf movements for a while. It's important to catch these things before they become more chronic issues. Give it a few weeks, If the pain persists, seek out a doctor or physio.
     
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    Last edited: Aug 5, 2016
  5. Badger67 Taxidea taxus

    Badger67
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    For anyone wondering about a good study on PF
    http://www.running-physio.com/pf-new-research/

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/sms.12313/abstract

    As someone with PF, i'm actually noticing time off isn't always the best bet. Eccentrics works well, as does a lacrosse ball for the feet. Good footwear is essential, and knowing when to stop walking; when your peroneals start taking over for the gastrocs, its a problem that goes beyond just PF.

    Also, sharp tingly burning and numb generally correlates with nerve tissue.
     
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    Last edited: Aug 5, 2016
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  6. ripskater Steel Belt

    ripskater
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    Rolling your bare feet on 4 inch pvc pipes can help that fascia.
     
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  7. Sano Brown Belt

    Sano
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    Cool article! Training with loads, nice and easy, often with a focus on isometric or eccentric contraction is definitely a good idea in regards to any tendinopathy or fascitis. Releasing fascia and stretching muscles are good too, should be combined imo.

    Hmm, sharp and numb pain could be nerves, n. tibialis does have cutan branches to calcaneus, but it's not the front. I'm trying to think of a scenario where the knee bump did that. It seems unlikely if the pain is aggravated under stretch, we need to know more. Could be another peripheral neuropathy, but that's hard to say without an examination. Do you have diabetes TS or are you on any new medication? :D Anyway!

    Could be an sub achilles/calcaneus bursitis as well, but that leads into the other two most of the time.
     
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  8. Badger67 Taxidea taxus

    Badger67
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    Tibial nerve branches into the lateral and medial plantar nerves. If he hit the medial aspect of the knee, i could see this being relative somehow. Then again, i'm wondering if maybe his description of it could be misconstrued as that does happen. In all honesty, i'd see a PT if i felt nerve issues.

    TS, this is the bottom of the foot, can you point to one specific location it hurts?
    [​IMG]
     
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  9. SeventySeven Blue Belt

    SeventySeven
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    I herniated a disc in the lumbar a few years ago, though never experienced any sciatica or nerve pain. So I don't know if that's related or not as well. Though the addition of blubberous mounds to my body since then probably are contributing as you've noted!

    For the pain in my foot, it is on the back of the heel -- not on the bottom. It's toward the lower side of the heel, but still nothing that actually touches the ground. And the pain doesn't travel too far up the hell either.
     
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  10. SeventySeven Blue Belt

    SeventySeven
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    Well, from that angle I'd say it's near the calcuneus area.
     
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  11. Badger67 Taxidea taxus

    Badger67
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    It very well could be, see a doctor, seriously. Often times nerve pain is referred. I'd start with looking into this as what is causing that with a doctor.
     
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  12. Sano Brown Belt

    Sano
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    And it hurts when you stretch your calf and point your toes towards yourself? Try holding that stretch and touch and squeeze the achilles tendon from the top and follow it down to the heelbone. Feel around about, is it sore? What does it feel like? How is the sense of touch?
     
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  13. SeventySeven Blue Belt

    SeventySeven
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    I didn't notice any soreness going down the tendon, just at the base/back of the heel. Now more a 'burning' sensation or having pins poked into the skin. Nothing seems linked to actual physical touch, not like touching a sore muscle or hurt tendon and saying OW!
     
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  14. SeventySeven Blue Belt

    SeventySeven
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    I suppose it could be. Although I've not had any back pain related to the hernia for over at least half a year now, and I never experienced any nerve pain or numbness even when it first occurred. It was more of the "axial" lumbar pain.
     
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  15. Sano Brown Belt

    Sano
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    Doesn't sound like it has anything to do with the herniated disk. I mean, if there are no other sciatic symptoms and no localised pain of any sort. Also, if it was a n. tibialis lesion it would be odd that it's concentrated only at the heel and not any pain or numbness under the foot. Again ts, how is the sense of touch in that area? What about under the foot and on the calf, does it feel normal? Also, can you do heel raises with equal strenght on that foot?

    Hmm, so it doesn't hurt when you touch the part thats giving you problems, but it hurts when you stretch it, right? My guess is that it's a sub achilles bursitis, but there is no way of knowing without doing an exam. Could be something else entirely. I would refer you to the previous advice further up. If it persist in a week or two, or if it gets worse, go see a doctor first and get referred to a physio!
     
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  16. SeventySeven Blue Belt

    SeventySeven
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    Nope, no pain or discomfort at any other time other than when doing the above stretches. No soreness to the touch. Aside from those flexing stretches, I wouldn't notice anything being wrong at all. It does seemed to have reduced in intensity since I last posted here though. Still present when doing the stretches, though not quite as bad. I guess that's a good sign!

    [​IMG]

    And yes, the pain is coming from that area in the lower image -- that red gelly pad thing on the rear of the foot, perhaps just slightly lower on my actual foot, at the level where that pink tendon attached to the bone. I also have flat feet... so from my other reading, it seems that can lead to a problem in the same area. Maybe it was caused by one incident or simply a perfect storm of my shortcomings taking place at one time! :'(
     
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  17. Sano Brown Belt

    Sano
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    Yeah pain in that spot when stretching the calf could be a sign of two of the things I mentioned earlier. Some sort of achilles tendinopathy or a retrocalcaneus/achilles bursitis (fancy words lol). Just means that it could be an issue with the tendon or the bursae, as shown in the picture. Plantar fascilitis is not out of the question either. Seeing as there is no pain at all when touching the tendon or insertion, it could be referred pain from the ankle joint, nerves or bone spurs as well. It's impossible to tell without a proper examination.

    Flat feet can indeed give some problems with both plantar fascilitis and achilles tendinopathies, depending on the cause. It all depends, they don't have to give any problems.

    Anyway, hope it improves!
     
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  18. Anjie Cottew White Belt

    Anjie Cottew
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    Can I ask how this all turned out? I'm experiencing the exact same symptoms you've described.
     
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  19. SeventySeven Blue Belt

    SeventySeven
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    No problems/symptoms of it for a long time now. I did the stretching routine and took it easy on the foot for a while -- seemed to go away and never flared up again. I'd say it took a number of weeks to be fully gone.
     
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