Grappling FAQ + Online Resources - *Read First*

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by Zankou, May 9, 2008.

  1. Zankou Literally Shaking

    Zankou
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    This FAQ attempts to answer the most commonly-asked questions about grappling, as well as to provide links to excellent online resources. This FAQ and the answers are the combined work of many excellent posters on this board - I mostly just edited it.

    NOTE: The "online resources" section follows below, at post #4 in this thread. It has lots of valuable links, so please check it out.

    The most frequently asked questions on this forum, with answers below:

    1. Are Japanese Jujitsu and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu the same?
    2. What's the difference between Judo and BJJ?
    3. What grappling style should I train?
    4. How long does it take to get a black/brown/purple/blue belt in BJJ?
    5. What color gi should I get?
    6. How do I beat someone bigger and stronger than me?
    7. My first tournament is coming up. What should I do?
    8. How do I do the anaconda/nog/gator/cool spinny/ choke?
    9. Ringworm!?!?!?
    10. What is the scoring system for BJJ?
    11. What is the scoring system for Judo?
    12. What is the scoring system for Sambo?
    13. What grappling skill level am I?
    14. How do I get out of side control?
    15. Should I train gi or no-gi?
    16. What books can get me started?
    17. What is the best video instructional?
    18. I can't finish the triangle choke!
    19. Cauliflower ear - what is it, and how do I fix it?
    20. How do I cut weight for a tournament?
    21. Leglocks - What are the differences between an ankle/achilles lock, heelhook, toehold, and kneebar? (And is it true the ankle/achilles lock is just a pain submission)?
    22. Lloyd Irvin?

    1. Is Japanese Jujitsu and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu the same?

    No. Japanese Jiu Jitsu was developed by samurai a long time ago. Jiu Jitsu back then was just a catch phrase for tricky unarmed fighting techniques.

    Brazilian Jiu Jitsu was developed by the Gracies after a Judoka named Maeda/Count Koma went to Brazil and taught them for a short time. The Gracies focused more on ground grappling and locks, pretty much eliminating all strikes and creating a special point system that emphasized obtaining a dominant position.

    2. What's the difference between Judo and BJJ?

    The techniques are the same. The gi is similar.

    The rules, however, are different. In Judo you win by scoring a clean throw on to their back, a submission, a pin for a certain amount of time or accumulating fractions of points by obtaining partial throws on the shoulders, sides, etc or pins for a short time. In BJJ you win by submission or, if the match time elapses without a submission, adding up the points you obtained through achieving positions and reversals during the match.

    Because of the way these rules differ, Judo focuses primarily on takedowns, while BJJ focuses primarily on ground grappling. Judo and BJJ both train in each of these areas, just with different emphasis.

    3. Which style should I do?

    I don't know. I've never met you.

    It depends on what your goal is and how much you are willing to sacrifice in order to obtain it.

    All grappling schools vary from gym to gym. I've been to schools where the style was the same, but one was really relaxed and cool, and the other was like boot camp. Both of them gave me what I wanted at that time.

    Best thing to do is find a gym in your area and do a trial lesson. Than choose the one that makes the most sense goal-wise, distance-wise, and financially.

    4. How long does it take to get a black/brown/purple/blue belt in BJJ?

    It is different for every person and instructor. BJ Penn obtained a black belt in 4 years with CONSTANT training every day...but the average is probably around 8 to 12 years. It *generally* takes around 6 months to 2 years for blue, and from there 2-5 to purple, and then 2-4 to brown, with brown to black about 1-3. But these are just very vague numbers, and it doesn't mean you are a prodigy/reject if you do it much slower or faster.

    5. What color Gi should i get?

    It depends primarily on your school. Blue or white gis are the standard colors. Most judo and BJJ competitions only allow blue or white gis. You are almost always best off buying a blue or white gi as a beginner.

    Know that some schools make you train in particular gis that match a school standard. Be aware. It is best to ask for advice at your school about this question, from your instructor or other students.

    6.How do I beat someone who is bigger and stronger than me?

    Jiu jitsu isn't magical. If your opponent is heavier and stronger, then you will need better technique in order to even the odds. If your opponent is both physically superior and has better technique, only a fluke/miracle can save you. Just relax, and train to get better, rather than worrying about beating a much better opponent.

    That said, the BJJ techniques that most consistently work against larger opponents tend to involve armdrags to take the back, spider guard, half guard, and footlocks.

    7. My first tournament is coming up. What should I do?

    Focus on your cardio and takedowns...the worst thing is to get really good at BJJ and then lose because your opponent took you down and stayed on top of you the whole match.

    The best way to get good at doing tournaments is by doing a lot of tournaments.

    8. How do I do the Anaconda choke/Nog Roll/gator roll/ cool spinny thingy?
    YouTube - Anaconda Choke - Denis Kang

    9. Ringworm?!?!
    Search Function

    10.what is the scoring system for bjj?

    BJJ scoring from bjj.com.au:

    Rules & RegulationsPoint system:
    Takedown - 2 points
    Sweep or reversal - 2 points
    Guard pass - 3 points
    Knee-ride - 2 points/3points
    Mount - 4 points
    Back control - 4 points

    11.What is the scoring system for Judo?

    In Judo competition the objective is to score an ippon (one full point). Once such a score is obtained the competition ends. Ippon can be scored by:

    Executing a skillful throwing technique which results in one contestant being thrown largely on the back with considerable force or speed.
    Maintaining a pin for 20 seconds.
    One contestant cannot continue and gives up.
    One contestant is disqualified for violating the rules (hansoku-make).
    Applying an effective armbar or an effective stranglehold (this does not usually apply for children).
    Earning two waza-ari (half point). A waza-ari can be earned by: 1) a throwing technique that is not quite an ippon (for example the opponent lands only partly on the back, or with less force than required for ippon); 2) holding one contestant in a pin for 20 seconds; or 3) when the opponent violates the rules (shido) three times.
    If the time runs out with neither contestant scoring an ippon, then the referee will award the win to the contestant who has the next highest score. For example a contestant with one yuko would win against an opponent who scored 4 kokas.

    12. What is the scoring system/rules for sport sambo?

    WINNING THE SPORT SAMBO MATCH (taken from rus-sambo.com):

    A match can be won in one of several ways:

    1. Total Victory (a "perfect throw" or submission hold) which ends match immediately;
    2. Technical Superiority (12 point difference in score), which ends match immediately;
    3. Point difference at end of match duration. If there has been no Total Victory or Technical Superiority, the sportsman with the most points at the end of the match wins - no minimum point score required. Tie matches are decided by a one minute overtime period, or if there is no winner at the end of overtime, by majority decision of the officials.

    SCORING IN SPORT SAMBO:

    1. Hold Down: (Immobilization or Predicament) - Similar to a judo hold down or a long wrestling near fall. One sportsman must hold the back of the other sportsman toward the mat in a danger position (less than 90 degrees), with chest, side or back in unbroken contact with the chest of the opponent to score. A hold down is "broken" when contact between the athletes is broken when space is created between them, or the defending athlete turns over to the stomach or the side with an angle greater than 90 degrees. A Hold down may only be scored once in a match and will earn either 2 points for a ten second hold down or 4 points for a twenty second hold down. Once a hold down is scored, a sportsman cannot attempt another.

    2. Submission Hold: A pressure hold (arm or leg lock) applied ot the arm or leg of the opponent which makes the opponent surrender or submit by calling out or by tapping the mat at least twice. Submission holds cannot be applied in standing position. A submission hold ends the match.

    3. Throw: A throw is scored anytime one sportsman takes another to the mat in a single, continuous and uninterrupted action. A Sambo throw is more than a simple wrestling takedown, however. Like a judo or Greco-Roman throw, it must start with both sportsmen on their feet, one sportsmen must unbalance the other and take the opponent directly to the mat with one action without stopping. A throw must knock the defender off their feet either by lifting or tripping them, not merely dragging them down. A throw is scored based on two factors: How the thrown athlete lands and whether the thrower remains standing (scoring twice as many points if remaining standing). A Perfect Throw results in Total Victory and stops the match when a sportsman throws the other to his back while remaining standing. Other throws will score 4 points, 2 points, or 1 point, depending on the impact point of the thrown athlete.
     
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    Last edited: Aug 12, 2014
  2. Zankou Literally Shaking

    Zankou
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    13. What grappling skill level am I?

    Imagine you had an unlicensed health worker who treated farmers in the fields for years. If he went to "the civilized world," would he immediately be given a medical degree, even if he knew more about first aid than those who had been out of med school a year? Probably not. If he went to school and studied, he might learn quicker, because of his experience, but he might also have to unlearn bad habits.

    The point of the story? Grappling's the same. Each grappling art has its own philosophy and even if you are a good grappler, it doesn't mean you are automatically "such and such" belt at BJJ or judo. Typically, to get a ranking in a grappling art, you have to attend that school and learn their philosophies and techniques before you can say that you are at a particular level in that style of grappling.

    14. How do I get out of side control?

    A video is worth a billion words.

    YouTube - BJJ: Sidemount Escapes

    If you don't like videos, however, here are (nearly) a billion words:

    This is possibly the most common question asked by new grapplers. The first thing to understand is that it is very hard to escape side control, and even experienced grapplers may have difficulty escaping against a skilled opponent. You are not likely to escape from an opponent who has more skill than you and/or is physically superior to you. The best way to escape is not to get caught in side control in the first place --- and that means developing a strong guard, which will take considerable time.

    If your guard is passed, however, you need to do the following:

    [1] Get on your side, facing your opponent. You do not want to be flat on your back.
    [2] You must win the grip battle, and position your arms correctly. Best is if you can obtain an underhook with your far arm, and using your near hand as a "paw" to keep his other arm from hooking under your head or extending your near arm. Keep your elbows tight on your chest, acting as a barrier between you opponent and yourself.
    [3] Do NOT allow your opponent to do one of three things: (a) underhook your far arm; (b) hook an arm under your head; (c) pull/push up on your near arm so that your near elbow is no longer serving as a barrier between your body and your opponent's body. If your opponent does any of these, you are basically screwed. If you are serious about escaping side control, you cannot let any of these happen, or your escapes are not likely to work.
    [4] If you cannot get the underhook, then you will want to keep both of your arms folded on your chest, but placing the last third of your forearm, including the elbow, in (a) the armpit and (b) the hip of your opponent, so that both of your opponents arms are on the other side of your body, and your elbows are pressed up against his flank by your head. This is sometimes called "pin prevention posture." In order to get your far arm past your opponent's arms and under his armpit, try pushing on his elbow, as though you were trying to push him over you.

    These first steps are CRUCIAL, and often not taught to beginners. If you lose the battle for positioning at the start, you are going to fail in your escape attempts.

    [5] BRIDGE! Okay --- so your arms are in position. You are ready to escape. The first thing you must do is MAKE SPACE FOR YOUR HIPS. You do this by explosively bridging into your opponent. Make sure to bridge over one shoulder, towards your opponent, not straight up.
    [6] Now SHRIMP your hips as far away as possible, rotating on your shoulder, using your arms to keep your opponent in place while your hips drive away. Repeat if necessary.
    [7] At this point you will have your hands against your opponent, be on your side, and your hips will be far away. You have two choices here: Go to your knees or pull your near knee across his stomach, straighten out, and reestablish your guard. Work between them. If you insist on just doing one, you will not likely get it. Take what you can get.

    That's it. Now, there are two additional "sweep" escapes that you can add after you master the basic shrimp escape dynamic --- sweeping your opponent over you (block his arm, grab a leg, and send him right over you), or driving into your opponent and flipping him over ("swim" your far arm into him as you switch base and drive). Both of these escapes require good timing, and for your opponent to be unbalanced. Even more important, both of these escapes require that your opponent be NEARLY PARALLEL to you, rather than perpendicular (as with normal side control). try to get your legs close to his legs, and distance your head/upper body, so that you are almost side by side. The "sweep" escapes will then become far easier. Usually these sweep escapes are good to do while your opponent is preoccupied with attacking (such as an Americana) or is busy trying to defeat a shrimping escape.

    15. Should I train gi or no-gi?

    Depends on the person and what you want to accomplish through Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. Opinion is split between three groups...the Gi-only group, the No-Gi only group, and (probably the largest) the train-both group.

    No-gi only jiu jitsu proponents tend to focus on the fact that MMA and street-fighting do not involve the gi. They point out that if you want to compete in MMA, you are training to fight without a gi. They often argue that top wrestlers do not train with a gi on to improve their no-gi takedowns, and top greco-roman wrestlers do not train judo, so it makes no sense to train with a gi on as a means to improve your no-gi grappling.

    Gi-only jiu jitsu proponents tend to argue that the most technical submission grapplers almost always favor training primarily in the gi. They argue that the gi forces you to be more technical and think through your actions, rather than using force and speed. In addition, they point out that the gi allows many more moves than no-gi, helps prevent transmission of skin diseases, and is more conducive to safe, slow rolling. Finally, they will note that almost any street fighting involves people who are clothed, rather than wearing MMA briefs, and will usually involve holding clothing.

    What appears to be the largest opinion group at the moment, and which most top competitors themselves advocate, is that both gi and no-gi should be trained, regardless of what you are aiming for. This view usually advocates that gi should be trained at the beginning, to develop good habits and leverage. No-gi should also be trained, for self defense purposes, for fun, and in order to create a base for MMA. No-gi is often transitioned into after the student has trained in the gi enough to rely on technique more than force and speed, or is offered at a separate class time. Proponents of this view often point out that top no-gi competitors are usually also the top gi grapplers, and gained most of their experience with the gi on.

    In truth, you should probably choose the school that is the best fit for you in terms of location, instruction quality, and overall "feel," rather than worrying about whether it is gi or no-gi. Most top BJJ instructors are highly adept at teaching both gi and no-gi.

    16. What books can get me started on learning BJJ?

    For BJJ: Saulo Ribeiro's "Encyclopedia of Jiu Jitsu" is probably the best general book. On specific topics, "The Guard," "Passing the Guard," and "Strategic Guard" by Ed Benneville are all excellent. So is Rodrigo Gracie's "The Path to Black Belt" and Kid Peligro's "Essential Guard."

    17. What is the best video instructional for BJJ or nogi grappling?

    For BJJ with a gi, Saulo Ribeiro's Revolution One is currently the best general BJJ instructional. For nogi grappling, Saulo Ribeiro's Freestyle Revolution set is probably the best general instructional. There are also many other fantastic instructionals on more specific grappling subjects and individual competitor styles ... use the search function.

    18. I can't finish the triangle choke!

    Pay attention:
    YouTube - proper triangle choke
     
    #2
  3. Zankou Literally Shaking

    Zankou
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    19. What is cauliflower ear, and how do I fix it?

    What it is:

    Cauliflower ear is term commonly used to describe the appearance of an ear that has had a perichondrial hematoma. This occurs when the ear is struck, hit, or excessively and abrasively rubbed. The skin on the ear tears away from the underlying cartilage. The perichondium, which supplies nutrients to the cartilage, is also ripped off of the cartilage. If left untreated, the cartilage will be starved of nutrients and die. The blood and puss that filled the gap when the skin was torn off of the cartilage will harden and leave a cauliflower like appearance.

    How it happens:

    Cauliflower ear occurs when the ear receives a hard strike, or is grinded against for extended periods of time. This is why it is so common among combat athletes and rugby players. In rugby, when tackles occur, the ear can be hit against the athlete being tackled, resulting in cauliflower. In jiu jitsu and wrestling, the ear can not only be struck hard (for instance: during a takedown, your ear hits his hip bone), but also abrasively rubbed (escaping from chokes, headlocks etc
     
    #3
  4. Zankou Literally Shaking

    Zankou
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    21. Leglocks - What are the differences between an ankle lock/achilles lock, heelhook, toehold, and kneebar (And is it true the ankle/achilles lock is just a pain submission)?

    A great instructional resource to explain leglocks:

    High Percentage Leglocks - Ankle Locks, Heel Hooks & Toeholds

    Great articles:

    Kneebar Leg lock Q & A from Grapple Arts
    Breaking down the Ankle Lock - an analysis of the basic foot lock

    Quick summary of each lock:

    Ankle lock/achilles lock: Works by extending the toes downward while cranking up on the achilles tendon, right behind the heel. Can be applied from a variety of leg positions. The names "ankle lock" and "achilles lock" essentially mean the same leglock, but minor differences in how the lock is applied can change its effect more towards crushing the achilles tendon or hyper-extending the foot -- either can create the tap, and both are usually involved to some degree. NOTE: Contrary to common claims, this lock can easily break/damage the foot, and is absolutely not just a pain submission. It is, however, probably the safest leglock, because there is little or no twisting action applied to the knee -- unlike the heelhook, which looks very similar and uses a similar control position as the ankle lock. For this reason, the straight ankle lock is typically legal at blue belt and up in gi BJJ, and always legal in no-gi competition.

    Heelhook: Looks very similar to ankle/achilles lock, but the heel is cupped over the arm rather than under it. The heel can be twisted either way, inside for a regular heelhook, outside for a reverse heelhook. The leg is twisted to finish, along with bridging back. Primarily attacks the knee and hip. A very dangerous submission that is always illegal in gi BJJ and in judo, but allowed in MMA and some no-gi tournaments. The reverse heelhook is probably the most devastating leglock of all, and can easily cause severe injury.

    Toehold: The toes are grabbed with one hand, and the other arm grabs the wrist in a "figure 4" lock on the foot. The foot is then twisted back. Attacks the ankle and knee joints. Legal at brown belt and above in BJJ. A very versatile attack that can be used from many positions. Also a dangerous lock, due to the twisting force it creates on the knee joint.

    Kneebar: Basically just like an armbar, but done to the leg. Requires good technique to finish, due to the great strength of the leg. Kneebar, as its name indicates, attacks the knee joint. It attacks an important joint, but because it does not use much twisting force, is usually thought to be somewhat less dangerous than heelhooks and toeholds. Usually legal in gi BJJ from purple on up.

    Others: There is a dizzying variety of leglocks, but 99% of what actually finishes people in competition are the locks listed above. You may also encounter calf slicers, shin locks, Indian death locks, hip locks, banana splits, etcetera, but they are much less frequent, and primarily applied by leglock specialists.

    22. Lloyd Irvin?

    Use the search function and enter "Lloyd" or "Llimp." You'll find out much more than you ever wanted to know.
     
    #4
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2014
  5. Zankou Literally Shaking

    Zankou
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  6. Zankou Literally Shaking

    Zankou
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    [Placeholder post for future material]
     
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  7. Zankou Literally Shaking

    Zankou
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    [Placeholder post]
     
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  8. Calibur Jiu Jitsu Snob

    Calibur
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    Good stuff.

    Did you consider entries on:

    Preparing for your first tournament.
    Half guard basics
    Gi recommendations and sites
    Eddie bravo and why he's so polarizing

    Jayskulz has a lot of stuff on the board that could be slipped into this thread.

    Oh, and how to cut weight safely.

    http://www.sherdog.net/forums/f15/weight-cutting-thread-450596/
     
    #8
  9. Kakkarot White Belt

    Kakkarot
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    zankou this thread is much appreciated bro ...keepit up man :)
     
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  10. mycompy386* Banned

    mycompy386*
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    Just curious as to why you didn't answer the "Ringworm!?!" "question"?

    You could have just added something like:
    Ringworm, also known as "Tinea", is an infection of the skin, characterized by a reddish to brownish raised or bumpy patch of skin that may be lighter in the center, giving the appearance of a 'ring'. Contrary to its name, ringworm is not caused by a worm but by parasitic fungi (Dermatophytosis). It can exist anywhere on the body.

    Fungi are organisms that survive by eating plant or animal material, those that cause parasitic infection (dermatophytes) feed on keratin, the material found in the outer layer of skin, hair, and nails. These fungi thrive best on skin that is moist, hot, and hidden from the light. Together with the other dermatophytosis, up to 20 percent of the population has one of these infections at any given moment. (Wikipedia)

    but it's your thread and thanks for all the other useful information.
     
    #10
  11. Zankou Literally Shaking

    Zankou
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    It's not my thread (I only wrote a small portion of it, most of my changes were editing to clean it up), it's for the whole forum! I welcome any additional entries, or answered questions, as long as they are good. If somebody wants to write a good ringworm answer (what it is, how you get it, how to avoid it, how to treat it), then I'll stick it in.
     
    #11
  12. slideyfoot Artemis BJJ Co-Founder

    slideyfoot
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    Might be worth linking in a few good episodes from the Fightworks Podcast, in particular the following:

    #007: Deadly Mat Bacteria (interview with guy from the Center for Disease Control)
    #074: Staph
    #114: Cauliflower Ear (interview on the topic with medical professional who trains BJJ)

    The other big question that I tend to see a lot is "Where can I train BJJ in [somewhere]?" Two resources around that can answer that fairly easily, depending on location (though both can be a little temperamental on loading, as they're relatively new):

    TrainJiuJitsu.com (US)
    bjjMap.com (mainly US, but also Europe)
    Gym Database (BJJ, MMA etc)

    Also a bunch of Google Maps:

    Pittsburgh (by frodo, I think)
    San Diego (by Caleb, from the Fightworks Podcast).
    Florida (by some guy listed as 'Gary')

    Then there's this big one simply called 'Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Gyms' by somebody posting as 'Misho', which as far as I can tell is a whole load of places around the US rather than a specific state.

    Finally, this is the one I've been building for the UK. Details of clubs below, with link to larger map at the top. I've also been writing a BJJ Beginner FAQ, which may be of use to newcomers to the sport.
     
    #12
  13. Cmac916 Orange Belt

    Cmac916
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    #18 does not work just to let you know.
     
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  14. jaysculls Purple Belt

    jaysculls
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  15. Senshi Brown Belt

    Senshi
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    this is a plethora of knowledge and more people should consult this thread
     
    #15
  16. badboybill White Belt

    badboybill
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    <a href="http://s124.photobucket.com/albums/p22/mayorgawj/?action=view&current=Gigueto.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i124.photobucket.com/albums/p22/mayorgawj/Gigueto.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>

    Andre "Gigueto" Soares - Gigueto Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu
     
    #16
  17. UnderdogWannabe White Belt

    UnderdogWannabe
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  18. UnderdogWannabe White Belt

    UnderdogWannabe
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    nicce neat collection
     
    #18
  19. WAR__MACHINE Banned

    WAR__MACHINE
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    I Just Had My Judo Fight This Weekend Won By Armbar
     
    #19
  20. CRAZYRIC Banned

    CRAZYRIC
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    major dedication an much appreciated will consult in the future
     
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