writing down no gi techniques in a log

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by snakeybizz, Jun 2, 2014.

  1. snakeybizz

    snakeybizz Purple Belt

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    So I was thinking it could be a good idea to either right a strategy flow chart or simply techniques from each position.

    I saw a really advanced butterfly guard flow chart (which I thought I saved, but cannot find, if anyone could help me find it again would be awesome). But yeah it was like threaten this attack if X fails go for Y, If he defends Y attack Z etc but it was from loads of potential positions from butterfly for example vs opponent standing or vs 1 foot planted etc.

    But anyway to the point do you think it would be worthwhile to right down all the techniques I've learnt and that work for me and maybe "ghost" practice them without a partner just to drill them into my head. I could maybe right all my closed guard breaks, then open guard passes, side control escapes etc.

    Or do you think I could do my own flow chart/strategy guide, I think that would be a little too advanced for me at the moment, I could probably study other flow charts that are already out there.
     
  2. Einarr

    Einarr Banned Banned

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    Jerking off would improve your Jiu-Jitsu just about as much.
     
  3. Was Exiled

    Was Exiled Brown Belt

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    So practicing the movement of a butterfly sweep by yourself won't help you whatsoever?
     
  4. snakeybizz

    snakeybizz Purple Belt

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    helpful response...

    but the ghost practice is not to get good at the technique or replacement for drilling...it is used a memory tool to memorize the techniques as I get overwhelmed by what I know and it absolutely would help for memory purposes

    That wasn't the point of my post tho, that was just something I threw in...the main point was the log
     
  5. FlexLuthor

    FlexLuthor Blue Belt

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    I keep a log and I find it helpful.

    I occasionally flow chart things.

    I find my time better spent lifting, stretching or recovering rather than trying to do strange solo grappling... But I'm sure it works for some people.
     
  6. BJJ_Rage

    BJJ_Rage Gold Belt

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    Yes it Will, it will clear your mins, especially at the lower levels...
     
  7. Gambledub

    Gambledub Brown Belt

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    Is this the butterfly chart?
    http://www.grapplersguide.com/free/No-Gi_Butterfly_Guard_Strategic_Outline.PDF

    The one I have on my computer also has the flow chart though! If this is the one you mean't let me know

    You could consider doing what I do, all you need is videos of the techniques you use (or film them yourself)

    I turn all the techniques I know, or want to learn into GIF's using a video to GIF converter, and then organize them in folders on my computer instead of a flowchart.

    That way I can watch the technique looped over, multiple times in a short time period. I find it helpful when trying to learn a technique, because while I kinda know the technique overall, I quite often miss the small yet crucial details (eg does my hand go under or over here, type of thing)

    What I really like about this is, if you have a smartphone you can put the GIFs on your phone, get an app to view them and take it to the gym to work on.

    You could also make a flow chart to go with the GIFs too!
     
  8. snakeybizz

    snakeybizz Purple Belt

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    Yep it is! thanks a lot, much appreciated!!! been looking for this for ages.

    The GIF idea is great! I think I might try that out, I know a bunch of techniques, but sometimes miss out the small crucial details like you said.

    Yeah I was planning on taking the notes/GIFs to class and just before a spar, have a quick look and remember my guard passes etc or if I'm against a meat head, go to my escapes section or whatever...it would be awesome to put the GIFs as part of a flowchart, I think the flowchart might have to wait till I start learning some more
    advanced principles like chaining attack and learning strategies etc
    .
    I'm convinced logging the techniques in some way will help me considerably, I just didn't want to waste my time so started this thread for feedback :D
     
  9. Dirty Holt

    Dirty Holt Black Belt Professional Fighter

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    If you need a book to organize how much bjj you know, then you dont really know it that well.

    I see younger wrestlers do the book thing all the time and its the same thing. I did it as well when I was young. I was taking in more information than I was actually putting in quality reps with.

    You need to address this with your coach. There is a ratio that I learned in my education theory classes when I was becoming a teacher and it holds pretty well to wrestling/bjj

    PRACTICE TIME (DRILLING) TO INSTRUCTION TIME

    Beginner: 3:1
    Intermediate: 5:1
    Expert 20:1

    If you arent following that equation, meaning for every move your coach takes 5 minutes to show, you do 15 minutes of drill uninterupted for, your ratio is fucked and you are getting over coached.
     
  10. Gambledub

    Gambledub Brown Belt

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    Heres the expanded version...
    http://www.grapplearts.com/No-Gi_Closed Guard_Strategic_Outline.pdf

    If I knew enough technical stuff about phones I would definitely make a flowchart app with embedable GIF's (anyone!)

    If you have an android phone (im not sure how the others work!) Just make folders to divide your techniques. The way I organise my GIF's a transition from reverse scarf to mount would be found like this (the bold white text being the folder I select)

    1. Bottom, Double Guard/Leglocks, Standing, Top

    2. Back Mount, Guard, Half Guard, Mount, Side Control, Sprawl & Turtle

    3. Crucifix, Knee Rides, Modified Scarf, Reverse Scarf, Scarf Hold, Side Control, Various

    4. Positional Control, Submissions, Transitions

    When I finish off my GIF's I should have the transitions folder divided into stuff like Mount, Back etc.

    If you want an example here is a RAR of the GIF's I put together for the Williams Guard Compendium. It shows how I organised GIF's for a specific guard position.

    http://www.mediafire.com/download/g201tbmk5udr02x/Williams+Guard.zip

    I find that after doing this, I only have broad conceptual tips in my notebook that I refer to before class etc. IMO the GIF's through a phone are way easier to find than flipping through pages and far easier to spot what you need to do in terms of technique etc
     
  11. snakeybizz

    snakeybizz Purple Belt

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    I agree I don't know it that well, its a case of information overload due to multiple coaches, I train at 4 different gyms lol...its not every position but some positions I just forget everything, then remember right after when I'm in bed thinking about what I could of done.
     
  12. BJJ_Rage

    BJJ_Rage Gold Belt

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    I teach only a small group, most of the times is about 5 - 10 guys tops, so I kind of gives me the privilege of staying on their asses as they do technique or drilling or situational sparring, so It might be different than you, also, I dont know shit about grappling as a whole comparing to you, so basically is just my opinion on trial and error...

    For example, I do go over things a lot, depending on who am I teaching to, for example, Im with a total new white belt, teaching basics move, lets say the RNC, I will put more focus on him learning the move as a whole, than the details... so I would not show many details, just will pair him with another white belt and make them do the move, make him feel the choke in this case... now when Im teaching a more advance group of guys, its different, for example, I would go a whole class abou back mount, specifically RNC, with all the details, really deep details, like hand fighting, different counters to the defenses, etc... now I would try to put on some logic on every single move, for example, I would not just go and tell them, grab this way because I say so and do it 1000 times... I would rather spend a little bit more of time explaining why I want them to grab this way, and showing them live... I believe this way, the technique is fixated way more, you take away the doubt that normally everyone has, the WHAT IF, by explaining the principals, you are making them understand the mechanics of the move, more likely convincing them that the move works. If this wasnt the case, I take my experience as an example, the student could go around trying stuff and wasting his time to only come back to the original techinque shown. Also, since theres so much techiniques online, everyone wants to taste the waters by their own, of course this is not a bad thing, its good, as long as the person is watching the right person, because there is SOOOOOO much crap on youtube as well... In my case, im just a purple, so naturally people tend to doubt somethings I show, thus my reason of explaining techniques in deep. I run a 2 hours class, so I have plenty of time to explain and after that, technique and situational rolling on the positions, so they get to try everything live. If I see someone doing something wrong, I will stay by him and watch him, may be try to coach him, If I see he doesnt listen, then I will stay still till the position changes, and ask him why did he fail to apply X move, what did he feel? I will show him what he was doing, vs what he was supposed to do, put them back into the position, and trying again... So far, I think Ive seen people progress very well under this system...

    I think lots of drilling, putting a lot of reps into a positions is only beneficial if you get to put the same ammount of time or more into situational sparring from that position (or at least try to mimic it, there are some positions are really hard to be place into situational sparring) and that is only possible for guys who train like pros, regular joes who go to class for 1 hour or 2 do not have that time, I believe time is better spent into getting people to understand positions and rolling than repetition for the sake of repetition.... Basically, its good to do 1000 reps of something, but you need to put taht into a resisting situation, jumping straight to other positions and doing 1000 of other without situation sparring does not produce optimal results (at lea st I gathered this from watching some higher belts that drill like crazy but do not do much of situational sparring, and when I see them in competitive rolls, I see no mayor improvement into their technique, at least not in relation with time spent drilling)

    but like I said, my experience is only teaching small group of people, I can understand than teaching a large group changes the whole methodology of the class...

    take in count I only teach to novice intermediate class (white to blue, may be some purples that drop by no gi days)
     
  13. BJJ_Rage

    BJJ_Rage Gold Belt

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    this is because you are trying to memorized step by step the techniques, but do not understand why are those steps there.... there are though some advance techinques that required memorization because logic is hard to see in the move, but the fundametals do not, try to think why you are doing things, things are going to be much easier to remember this way...
     
  14. Dirty Holt

    Dirty Holt Black Belt Professional Fighter

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    The ratios that I follow(3:1,5:1,20:1) actually are called practice to instruction ratio. This means that for every minute of verbal or visual instruction one receives, they need to follow the ratio with hands on practice. This can be rote (drilling), or meaningful (positional sparring.)

    The reason why using a log is no better than having a youtube playlist on your computer is because there is no psychomotor connection. If you need to reference a book to be able to be able to perform a move, then it is a useless move in your repetiore, because it literally does not exist in any kind of training/competition environment you will come across.

    I will say this: Using a log book is beneficial for camps/seminars when you are not allowed to film. This was a big thing back in the day from wrestling because there wasnt much scouting tape on guys, and no one wanted their shit out there to be scouted.
     
  15. FlexLuthor

    FlexLuthor Blue Belt

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    I find the log useful for organizing thoughts and remembering details. I only have so much practice time during the actual class to get it into my brain.
     

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