Would training in the heat be beneficial when transitioning to normal temp?

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by Oldmanfighter, Jul 23, 2010.

  1. Oldmanfighter

    Oldmanfighter White Belt

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    Same way as training at an altitude could help one, could training in the heat(100 degree garage) benefit one when switching to an air conditioned atmosphere?
     
  2. Dafreeclinic

    Dafreeclinic Orange Belt

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    I would assume no unless you were trying to lose water weight. Is this a cardio question?
     
  3. DarkBlack454**

    DarkBlack454** Banned Banned

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    Yes it would. Working hard in the heat builds endurance. It's a nice addition to busting your ass if you want to get in great shape.
     
  4. FalconPunch

    FalconPunch White Belt

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    It's not the same as high altitude training. High altitude training has to do with less oxygen in the air and boosting red blood cells. I wouldn't recommend training in a hot environment, unless your sport requires you to compete in a similar environment, then it would help your body adjust to the temperature change. I would think it would be uncomfortable and dehydrating.
     
  5. Origins

    Origins Blue Belt

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    Just from personal experience, I had club wrestling this summer in a very hot room. It felt like wrestling in a sauna. When I went to a tournament a few weeks ago, I found the match in a normal-temperature room much easier. It could be due to factors besides actual endurance/conditioning, but it did help.
     
  6. KILL KILL

    KILL KILL Gold Belt

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    If your body becomes acclimated to intense heat, it will have to work much less to keep itself cool while training / working / competing in a lower temp. That being said, working out in such extreme temps may hinder you. For example, if you're lifting in your garage, you may not be able to get that last rep or be too tired to finish the last set because your body is working so hard to cool itself which may hurt you in the long run.
     
  7. Oldmanfighter

    Oldmanfighter White Belt

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    Could you elaborate further, please?
     
  8. MAvulture

    MAvulture Purple Belt

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    As an australian, I can confirm this. Just as heat exhaustion effects you during heavy exercise at high temperatures, the same can happen at unusually low temperatures when you arent used to it (like if you are used to hotter climates). The body can cool down too much and seize up.
     
  9. Indivdude

    Indivdude Blue Belt

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    That seems like it'd be hypothermia and that Lusst was joking..
     
  10. callador

    callador Blue Belt

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    I don't know. A good test is to climb up to 40,000 ft and de-compress real fast. In the seven seconds or so that you have of useful consciousness, try to hit a 1RM of squat... then you get the high altitude training and the cold weather shock training too (-55C). See if you guys were pilots you would know about this elite style of training!!! :)
     
  11. Indivdude

    Indivdude Blue Belt

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    That is truly an elite routine. I've been doing it wrong all along.
     
  12. callador

    callador Blue Belt

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    It's expensive, but you can also do negative G reps... great ego boost!
     
  13. jtmb

    jtmb Blue Belt

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    I remember reading in one of my physiology texts that heat acclimatization does occur, but the effects aren't really Earth-shattering. Now that I looked it up, it states that studies have shown this process takes approx. 9-14 days by exercising in high heat conditions for an hour or more. These changes result in cardiovascular adaptation, followed by plasma volume expansion and finally alterations to sweating distribution and salt content.

    While this does result in performance increase, these adaptations are somewhat specific and since athletes typically train under circumstances where core/brain temperatures are elevated, they are already generally adapted to performing in high temperature environments.

    Also, there is obviously a threshold that will ultimately overwhelm the body and performance will decrease; it might not be in your best interest to intentionally train in a hotter environment because you could inadvertently be training at below optimal conditions resulting in wasted training time.
     
  14. NinjaBlack

    NinjaBlack Blue Belt

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    Some good info in here.
    I also lift in 100+ degree weather on a regular basis.
     
  15. MAvulture

    MAvulture Purple Belt

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    I dont know I was just talking shit. In all honesty I dont see any harm in training in hot climates as long as you know when to stop, and it might help you learn to handle heat exhaustion or some shit, but I always exercise at night or with the air con cranked up so meh. I highly doubt it would be of significant use.
     
  16. James Fuller

    James Fuller Amateur Fighter

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    TS, are you from Kansas City?
     

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