Elections With the latest coup against Malcolm Turnbull, Australia now had five Prime Ministers in five years

Discussion in 'The War Room' started by Arkain2K, Aug 23, 2018.

  1. Arkain2K

    Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

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    WTF?? Not again!! Australian political parties are determined on swapping out PMs whenever they want!! :eek:

    How would any long-term policy get done with this bizarre game of musical chair? o_O


    Malcolm Turnbull on the brink as Australian government plunges into turmoil
    By Ben Westcott, CNN | August 23, 2018​

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    The Australian government is in chaos amid a desperate attempt by Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull to resist a leadership push from his ruling Liberal Party's right-wing faction, led by former Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton.

    Dutton announced early Thursday he would challenge Turnbull for the second time in a week, following the resignation of more than a dozen ministers across the government.

    But the Australian leader fought back against the conservative uprising at a hastily called news conference in Canberra Thursday, accusing a minority of destabilizing the government in an attempt to seize power.

    "Australians will be rightly appalled by what they're witnessing in their nation's parliament today and in the course of this week," Turnbull said, describing the campaign against him as "a form of madness."

    Staring down the challengers, Turnbull said he would only hold a leadership vote if he was given a petition with signatures from the majority of his party room. If it arrives, the meeting would be held at midday Friday.

    While the tide appears to be turning against the prime minister, Turnbull has also suggested that his main challenger Dutton might not even be eligible to sit in parliament, following local media reports that he may have violated constitutional restrictions over his family business investments.

    The party's right-wing have always viewed Turnbull with suspicion and hostility, given his moderate positions on a number of policies. Assisted by conservative media personalities, the vocal faction has been pushing for cuts to immigration and greater investment in coal power.

    Australian dollar plunges

    With leadership of the Liberal Party in doubt, the government controversially shut down debate in the parliament five hours early Thursday, leading to accusations by the opposition Labor Party that it had lost control.

    The Australian dollar plunged on the news of the leadership crisis, falling to 72.9 US cents by midday.



    Turnbull faced down an initial challenge on Monday amid a conservative uprising in the Liberal Party's ranks over climate change policy.

    Dutton, a high-profile member of the party's conservative faction, was narrowly defeated by Turnbull 48 to 35 but with only seven votes between them, it made a second challenge likely.

    On his official social media account, Dutton said Thursday he had spoken with Turnbull "to advise him I believed the majority of the party room no longer supported his leadership. Accordingly, I asked him to convene a party room meeting at which I would challenge for the leadership of the Parliamentary Liberal Party."



    The chaos deepened later Thursday morning amid local media reports that Treasurer Scott Morrison could throw his hat into the ring for leader, in place of Turnbull.

    If Dutton or a third contender takes power, they will be Australia's sixth prime minister in just over a decade, amid a revolving door of leadership changes in the country's major parties.

    Since 2007, no Australian prime minister has faced two consecutive elections.

    https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2018/08/22/australia/australian-politics-dutton-intl/index.html
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2018
  2. squeezewax

    squeezewax Brown Belt

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    Turnbull is a very weak PM and man, imo. He is not really a Liberal and he should of stepped aside ages ago.
     
  3. Arkain2K

    Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

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    How to fix the flaw at the heart of Australian politics
    By Dave Sharma | 22 August 2018

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    Peter Dutton and Malcolm Turnbull earlier this year.​


    I recently returned from four years serving as Australia’s ambassador to Israel, a country known for its fractious politics and unstable, coalition governments. During my term, I dealt with only one Israeli prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu. But I served four different Australian prime ministers - Julia Gillard, Kevin Rudd, Tony Abbott and Malcolm Turnbull.

    To lose one prime minister may be misfortune. To lose two may indicate carelessness. But to cycle through four prime ministers in four years, and be on the brink of yet another defenestration of a sitting prime minister, suggests something more profound - a structural flaw at the heart of Australian politics.

    There are several easy targets to blame for Australia’s new-found fondness for political instability.

    There is the relentless and unforgiving poll-driven media cycle and its class of political journalists: demanding a response to every bad poll, forever fuelling leadership stories, and predisposed to analysing politics as a football match - calling the game without any reference to the substance, merit or contest of competing ideas.

    There are the politicians themselves: increasingly careerists for whom politics is a profession, not a public service, and whose instinct for self-preservation readily overrides broader appeals to party unity, party discipline, and the expressed will of the electorate.

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    Kevin Rudd cries at Parliament House after his removal as prime minister.​


    Then there is the voting public: impatient, ephemeral in its loyalty, readily bored with politics, and demanding of the next big talent.

    Finally, there are the institutions themselves. A prime minister who is elected by his or her party, not by the public; a system where the party room can depose a prime minister, without reference to the electorate; and a political term that is short (three years) and not fixed in duration.

    Each of these factors bears some of the blame for the situation we find ourselves in today. Most are out of our control: the product of changing times and changing norms. But one element stands out as susceptible to reform, and that is the political system itself.

    Australia’s current constitutional system did not proceed from any grand design. Constitutional conventions were held to draft it prior to Federation, but on the whole our system of government largely imported the Westminster model. There were not the ferocious arguments about how to construct good government in a republic and avoid a tyranny of the majority, such as those which characterised the debate during the development and adoption of the United States Constitution, for instance. Australia’s constitutional evolution was incremental, rather than revolutionary.

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    Prime Minister Julia Gillard​


    Part of the problem is that the prime minister of the day holds no direct mandate from the Australian public. The public sees the prime minister as its own property, voted into office by it at the election. Hence the outrage when a sitting prime minister is dumped without having faced or lost an election (now the normal means of a transfer of power in Australian politics). But our constitutional system means that the prime minister is simply first among equals, the holder of an office which is bestowed - and can be removed - by his or her political party.

    Part of the problem is that the term of the federal parliament is both short and not fixed in duration. With only three-year terms, Australia is almost unique amongst liberal democracies. In Canada and Germany they have four-year fixed terms. The UK has five-year fixed terms, as does France. But in Australia, an election is always just around the corner, meaning members of parliament are forever focused on their electoral survival - and less so on the national interest. The steady drip of opinion polls and the relentless media cycle exacerbates the short-termism.

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    Prime Minister Tony Abbott​

    Successfully amending the constitution in Australia is no small feat, and it should not be undertaken lightly. But our politicians, by proving themselves so willing to depose sitting prime ministers without reference to the electorate, have shattered a norm on which much of the stability of the Australian political system rested. Perhaps it is up to us - the voting public - to repair this damage.

    Neither a directly elected head of government nor longer parliamentary terms - both options which warrant serious examination - are unusual for liberal democracies. The challenge for Australia would be to conduct this debate above the realm of politics-as-usual. A blue-ribbon, bipartisan commission, involving former senior politicians, from across Australia’s political spectrum - and at both state and federal level - would be a start. While at it, they could address some other anachronisms of our present constitution, including the dual-citizenship prohibitions, the lack of Indigenous Australian recognition, and imbalanced federal-state relations.

    If our political system is broke - and it surely is - then we should be prepared to fix it.

    https://amp.smh.com.au/politics/fed...t-of-australian-politics-20180822-p4zyyl.html
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2018
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  4. Neph

    Neph Purple Belt

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    In case anyone is thinking this is some kind of meltdown, it is more of a "WTF are you idiots doing" rather than "the sky is falling". This has happened quite a few times in the last decade or so.
     
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  5. Ruprecht

    Ruprecht Hands Of The Judges Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    The new normal.
     
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  6. Cid

    Cid Silver Belt

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    Geez, Thursday already?
     
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  7. Ruprecht

    Ruprecht Hands Of The Judges Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    Having gone as far as it has, and with Cormann and Co dropping their support, it seems likely Turnbull's time is up.
    Dutton's failed bid on Tuesday and the fact that his politics are toxic to the majority of people under 65 would surely make him a long shot.
    Bishop is basically stating that the coming election will be a massacre, and that she's the best one to stem the bleeding. Presumably because she's the most recognised and stable political figure amongst the group.
    Neither her nor Morrison have managed to distinguish themselves from Turnbull though.
    Predictions?
    Bishop by death stare.

    [​IMG]

    Although I've got no confidence in the call.
     
  8. Neph

    Neph Purple Belt

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    Turnbull was dead as soon as the first leadership spill was called. It was just a question of time.

    I honestly don't know who the best candidate is for the coalition at this stage but I suspect we can cross out Morrison. In my eyes I think it might be Bishop however the conservative base is screaming for someone further to the right than Turnbull so what I might want probably doesn't reflect what a very large voting base desires. Does it matter if Dutton is hated by progressives if they aren't voting liberal anyway?
     
  9. Ruprecht

    Ruprecht Hands Of The Judges Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    Yes, because of compulsory voting you can't win an election in Australia simply by appealing strongly to your core base. You need majority appeal.
    In the polls Shorten was preferred to Dutton 59:36 (in the same poll where Turnbull lead Shorten 52:45). That means that swing voters hate the guy. They are the ones that matter, not the voters that will vote Labor or Greens regardless.
    He'd do well in Queensland, Victorian Liberals wouldn't stand a chance.
     
  10. Neph

    Neph Purple Belt

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    Those polls aren't necessarily reflective of how people vote. Yes, Turnbull has led Shorten before in such polls however on a two party preferred basis Labor has been on top for 38 consecutive Newspolls. More recently both parties have been losing market share to the more extreme elements either left or right of their position - Labor with the Greens, Liberals with various One Nations/Family First style parties. I'm not sure how cut and dry it is to say that losing numbers in the middle is going to happen or if galvanizing the right wing of Australia is more productive.

    What I can say is that whomever takes the helm is probably due for a thrashing in the next poll.
     
  11. Supereem

    Supereem Black Belt

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    Sad to say the Liberal party is fucked. When someone who looks and acts like Voldemort is on the verge of taking over what was supposed to be a center right party you know you’re done. He’s worse than Abbott. Labour at the federal level is useless but looks like the best choice right now. Australian politics is a mess.
     
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  12. Supereem

    Supereem Black Belt

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    Politicians like Dutton are a scourge.
     
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  13. Ruprecht

    Ruprecht Hands Of The Judges Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    The poll numbers vary a lot, so I'm not looking at the numbers as absolutes. I'm looking at the impact on swing voters.
    You only need to look at what happened in WA with the One Nation preference deal to see what happens when the major parties are seen to polarise or favor a comparative minority of the electorate.
    Or for that matter look back to Howard and his "Work Choices".
    Political disengagement always favours the independents and minor parties, which is certainly when the major parties will address their platforms.
    I wouldn't be at all surprised if the Liberals start to play at populism and conservative identity politics. It wouldn't be the first time. Dutton's just too ham fisted with it. American style political polarisation doesn't work when you have a voter turnout of 91% of the population (although it's significant that the last election saw the lowest turnout since voting was made compulsory).
     
  14. Madmick

    Madmick Cerebrage Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    What the hell is the crisis supposed to be down there that could justify 5 executives in as many years?
     
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  15. Ruprecht

    Ruprecht Hands Of The Judges Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    In Turnbull's case it's the same thing that did him in last time. The conservative wing of his own party doesn't support him on energy policy and climate change.
     
  16. HIMBOB

    HIMBOB Steel Belt

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    Power of groups who own fossil fuels.

    The money wants free pollution, the people don't.

    The money gets you in the seat but they realise they are doomed at elections if they support the emitters.

    One the loudest voices of coal industry is the ex PM signed us up to the Paris agreement.
     
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  17. Arkain2K

    Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

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    That's what happen when you have a bizarre political system where a dissenting faction in the governing party can call for a vote among themselves for a new guy or gal whenever they want, no mandate from the public voters required. Hell, some Australian PMs only lasted a few months before their party changes its mind, just because the PM did or said something that doesn't fit the party's agenda.

    The only way to put an end to this circus is a complete Constitutional overhaul of this ridiculous system, which they pretty much just copy/pasted from the Brits instead of putting in the time and effort to build something of their own upon achieving Independence.

    The PM's fiduciary duty to his country and people should be greater than his party loyalty. For that to happen, the Australian Constitution NEEDS to finally establish a clear minimum term limit so their Executive can do his job without being held hostage.
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2018
  18. Supereem

    Supereem Black Belt

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    The PM isn’t the executive head, he is the head of the legislative. Big difference.

    The last thing Australia needs is a “president”.
     
  19. Arkain2K

    Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

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    The latest leadership spill proves one thing — democracy is dead in Australia
    AUSTRALIA has become a “laughing stock”. Our democracy is dead, and its killers are now running the country.
    Joe Hildebrand | August 22, 20186

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    "I’ll just sit at the back quietly."







     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2018
  20. The Witcher

    The Witcher відродитися

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    Turnbull is the first prime minister i respected. Australian politics is a shambles.
     

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