Wind overhand punches?

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by Hendersonfan119, May 30, 2008.

  1. Hendersonfan119

    Hendersonfan119 Yellow Belt

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    How do you feel about them? My dad did some boxing and says they are horrible because you lose all your power, I noticed it is a popular trend in MMA. how do you feel about them?
     
  2. NinjaKilla187

    NinjaKilla187 Blue Belt

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    Overhand punches allow you to use shoulder/waist whip to get power. They are inherently less accurate and slower than straight punches but can avoid guard techniques. There's a time and a place for both. Many boxers use the overhand right, including B-Hop, Mayweather, etc.

    Many MMA guys lack the technique to use both straight and looping punches effectively.
     
  3. Hendersonfan119

    Hendersonfan119 Yellow Belt

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    I meant Wild overhand punches, not wind lol.
     
  4. mvisit1

    mvisit1 Blue Belt

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    I agree with Ninja, there is a time and place for both...but I don't see how you "lose all of your power" with a wild overhand. If it is executed properly and happens to connect, it's goodnight for your opponent.

    YouTube - Chuck Liddell Teaches His Overhand Right...
     
  5. fightingrabbit

    fightingrabbit Banned Banned

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    eh..wild usually means no technique. While you're right it can do massive damage. Theres a good chance you'll throw yourself out of position and eat some terrible terrible counters.
     
  6. keusegg**

    keusegg** Guest

    when fighting someone who sits in defence/jab jab jabs all day overhand rights and right hooks are all you can do once they throw that jab.
     
  7. earthman32

    earthman32 Orange Belt

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    There are four types of strikes: those that come from the sides, straights, from bottom to top, and top to bottom. Which strike you use depends on the type of defense employed by your opponent.
    The time & place for an overhand? ...When you're fighting a taller fighter who is trying to keep you at bay with straight punches. The reasoning is that an overhand requires you to also use a slip, the natural head movement to avoid straight punches. Plus (and this is why it is called an "overhand") you are elevating your elbow so the strike goes over the hands of your opponent. Example of excellent use of the overhand: Fedor. He employs overhands from the guard in devistating fashion (what does he not do well?!). You can also use it if you set it up with straights to the body. When you slip, your opponent reacts as if you're attacking the body again, but instead of throwing to the body, you sling an overhand. AND Mighty Mo. Can't forget him. He has THE BEST OVERHAND in the business.
     
  8. Gavin Smith

    Gavin Smith Amateur Fighter

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    I think they can actually be used to good effect, there's one guy who I train with who's got really quick reactions and good head movement and it's hard for me to hit him with straight punches, but a jab to the body followed by an over hand right gets him almost every time lol.
    Certainly not my favourite punch but can be effective if used at the right time or against the right type of opponent
     
  9. ich1ban

    ich1ban Purple Belt

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    I love doing them against taller opponents. They're great.
     
  10. fightingrabbit

    fightingrabbit Banned Banned

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    good explanation. The overhand does require you to move your head out of centerline and yeah i think it suits short fighters real real well. Tall people sometimes have a tendency to do the Ali pull back against shorter fighters. Thats when they eat a long left hook or an overhand. That'll learn em..
     
  11. Brent Schermerhorn

    Brent Schermerhorn Green Belt Professional Fighter

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    my .02
    Don't forget something very useful about that punch and why it's used in MMA...you can use it when you faint a shot for a takedown...you dip he think you're looking for the takedown might drop his hands a little and looking for underhooks and your head well below and WHAM..he gets smashed with a right out of no-where.
     
  12. Stand-Up!

    Stand-Up! Yellow Belt

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  13. mschatz

    mschatz Hamma: I has it

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    I see a lot more overhands in MMA than boxing. What sport are you seeing 14 oz gloves in, btw?
     
  14. mschatz

    mschatz Hamma: I has it

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    Sigh.

    So, overhand rights and right hooks are good counters to a jab? You better be damn careful throwing rear hand hooks from a distance.

    If someone is jabbing, you can jab with them, you can try and time a straight right hand over the top of his jab, you can even counter with a left hook. All of these are better options than throwing a rear hand hook from range.
     
  15. Hendersonfan119

    Hendersonfan119 Yellow Belt

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    I have another question, what is your favorite overhand right defense?
     
  16. Volund

    Volund Mighty Healthy

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    well I can think of one situation where a rear hook would work well against a jab.

    Lets say your opponent is a southpaw. he throws a jab, and you slip to the left (his outside). At the same time, throw the rear (right hand) hook under the punch and into their body or chin.

    This is how Kid Yamamoto got KO'd by Mike Zambidis

    [​IMG]

    Besides that, I can't really see a reason to chance throwing the rear hook against a jab.
     
  17. fightingrabbit

    fightingrabbit Banned Banned

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    thats actually a pretty cool counter. I never thought of that one. Then again, imma have to watch that fight to see the conditions Zambidis executed it under. A straight would work just as well though i guess. Thats the natural counter to a southpaw jab.
     
  18. fightingrabbit

    fightingrabbit Banned Banned

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    lol just a block or slip. Like any other punch. Or wax on wax off.

    Pretty blanket statements. explain why for further discussion.
     
  19. eLbo85

    eLbo85 Blue Belt

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    i had a fight last saturday.
    amateur boxing featherweight class.

    my opponent was so tall. that fucker ate my soul in round 1 with just straight punches. i couldnt do nothing plus he was fighting in his hometown so i couldnt rely on the judges either.
    usually i am a defensive boxer trying to play with the reach and going backwards all the time. didnt work...

    that overhand right was all i had that night and i wont say anything bad about it again. hehehehe
     
  20. mschatz

    mschatz Hamma: I has it

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    Sure, you talk about being or fighting a southpaw and the dynamic changes.
     

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