What's more effective in a real fight?

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by Splatterbeast, Jul 21, 2010.

  1. Wrestling or BJJ? Can BJJ be used in a real fight on its own?
     
  2. Jagcorps_esq

    Jagcorps_esq Red Belt

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    This is a terrible thread and you should have your man privileges revoked for even raising the issue.
     
  3. Aesopian

    Aesopian Brown Belt

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  4. SuperSuperRambo

    SuperSuperRambo Senior Moderator Senior Moderator

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    Nope. MMA is fixed. Submissions don't work in the street, nor do takedowns.

    Yes, of course BJJ can be used in a real fight on its own, that's what it was designed for. The issue is whether, in the given situation, is it best to use bjj or another strategy. That depends on a potentially infinite number of variables.
     
  5. HardEight

    HardEight Blue Belt

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    \thread.
     
  6. Thanks.

    Sorry for the "dumb question", I'm a total noob. I'm interested in Wrestling but wondering what would overall be most effective. Of course you have to see the situation you're in and go from there, but in a theoretic scenario if you only knew ONE style, which would be the better and give you a better chance of winning/surviving?

    Im also thinking Id like to do BJJ as well, but not sure about the ranking systems. Does it really take years to get good at BJJ? It seems like so many people pick up wrestling in highschool and college and get good at it in a short amount of time.
     
  7. lechien

    lechien Gold Belt

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    It is all based on how much effort you put in the sport/training.
     
  8. ShindoNinja

    ShindoNinja faixa marrom

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    Honestly, around here kids carry knives now. It's not even worth getting in a fight. Look the other way, "punk out" and don't get stabbed or worse.
     
  9. GotDaWork

    GotDaWork White Belt

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    Wrestling has pins,not submissions strong at takedowns , they dont work off there back,BJJ More Judo throws than takedowns,submissions,and work off there back,BJJ has allot more tools than wrestling does,but it really matters about how much work you put into your training.
     
  10. SuperSuperRambo

    SuperSuperRambo Senior Moderator Senior Moderator

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    Having done both, I will tell you that it takes years to get good at either one. Both involve training your body to move in new and different ways without thinking. Most people get frustrated within the first year of either (because after a year you still pretty much suck) and quit. Nothing worth learning is that easy.

    What is better for self defense is a matter of opinion. Wrestling is better for takedowns, but has no real finishing holds, just pins. So your end result is either pummeling the person, or holding them down. BJJ does is not as strong in the takedown department (although certainly you'll learn enough to take down someone with no training), but it has a variety of finishing holds comprised of chokes and joint locks. And of course you can still use ground n pound or just subdue the person.

    In my opinion, bjj is better for a fight because it's designed for a fight. But if you're asking about MMA, where the people are well trained in grappling and high-level takedowns are more important, I would say they are equals as a base.
     
  11. So if a wrestler is pinned, would that mean he would not know how to get up from off of his back whereas in BJJ you could?

    Can you do ground 'n' pound with BJJ?
     
  12. lechien

    lechien Gold Belt

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    In wrestling, once you are pinned, it is the end of the match.

    In BJJ, a pin means nothing and the match keep going on.

    No striking is allowed in typical BJJ training.

    Some school still offer some type of self defense, Vale tudo, MMA but you must check with each individual school first.
     
  13. GotDaWork

    GotDaWork White Belt

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    Exactly, yes you could Ground n Pound with any grapplng style,but typically in a BJJ school they wont teach you that. If your guard is good enough in BJJ,you wont get G'n'p. My friend used to wrestle and he said BJJ is like a whole different mentality then wrestling.
     
  14. SuperSuperRambo

    SuperSuperRambo Senior Moderator Senior Moderator

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    A wrestler will know how to escape a pin and get back to his feet, but he'll do it in the way that's advantageous in a wrestling match. That means basically escaping the pin to get to all fours, and then standing up while breaking the opponent's grip on you. In BJJ that's considered bad because you're giving up your back.

    You can to gnp with anything that allows you to get on top of the guy. It's just punching a guy when you're on top. Wrestling, BJJ, judo, will all give you positions from which to use gnp.
     
  15. Thanks guys, the last 2 responses gave me a clear view on both styles.
     
  16. teamcarvalho

    teamcarvalho Green Belt

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    Good answer
     
  17. One other thing that comes to mind... in a real fight, if you're a BJJ guy, obviously once youre on the floor you have the upperhand with submissions and all that etc... the question is, how do you take the fight to the floor in a safe(r) way instead of just laying down and letting the guy climb on you?
     
  18. lechien

    lechien Gold Belt

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    Let me explain the point system which is ingrained in every BJJ students from day one.

    2 points for takedows,
    3 pass the guard,
    2 for knee on the belly,
    4 points for mount or back control.

    As you can see, It is 2 points for takedown. So in BJJ, we train to take your opponent to the ground.

    I specialise in wrestling such as single, double and more greco style i.e from the clinch.

    I like the greco clinch because i fell safer to clinch first to avoid unecessary strikes.

    Some guys in my team rather do judo throws.

    It is a matter of personal taste.

    BJJ has mediocre stand up skills if compare to wrestling or Judo but you should acquire enought skills to guarantee a takedown on the average Joe on the streetz!
     
  19. Spoken

    Spoken Gold Belt

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    neither... it must be tae kwon do or you will die.
     
  20. dirtypablo

    dirtypablo Brown Belt

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    We train takedowns in bjj!! Just not as much as wrestlers. A person with a few years of bjj training should be able to take down someone with no training pretty easily.

    This has been discussed before. Pretty much any grappling style where you train with active resistance will give you a huge advantage over someone with no training in a street fight, be it wrestling, bjj, judo, or sambo. Theyre all good.
     

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