What type of stance should I use?

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by Bodybuilder MMA, Mar 12, 2008.

  1. Bodybuilder MMA

    Bodybuilder MMA Yellow Belt

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    I used to do light boxing(mostly for cardio)

    I am a south paw and would have my left foot back and lead with my right foot, they would be almost in a straight line.

    But I am getting into MMA, and my friends said that doing that leaves me open for kicks to my legs and that I should stand with both feet almost at the same level.

    which is correct?
     
  2. mschatz

    mschatz Hamma: I has it

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    MMA stance is a little more squared up, thats true.
     
  3. fightingrabbit

    fightingrabbit Banned Banned

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    I was watching a Vitor Belfort instructional, he said your legs need to be in a position where your lead leg can check kicks.

    Hes a southpaw too. Go look for the video.
     
  4. Old Man

    Old Man Black Belt

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    Your stance will vary depending on what you are doing. Punching, kicking, clinching, shooting for a takedown. But in general your friend is correct. Boxers often put a lot of weight on the front foot, and that is a nice target. But there are a lot of things you can do in boxing that you can't get away with in MMA. Watch some video of Muay Thai fighters to get an idea of stances that can handle kicks and knees.
     
  5. Garrett E.

    Garrett E. Orange Belt

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    My theory on this is that a boxer can box in an mma match, using a boxing stance. Just because he leaves the lead leg out doesnt mean that anyone can just come in and try to grab it for the takedown. Maybe if you know the guy your facing is really competent in takedowns you should be more wary but if you train and are good, you should be able to recognize it and prevent it from happening etiher way.

    A squared up stance IMO will get you hit in the body. I know its good for shooting, judo, bjj and about any other grappling, but for striking, it just isnt as proficiant as having a lead planted in front of a rear that pivots.

    You just have to get good at recognizing the shoot.
     
  6. Bodybuilder MMA

    Bodybuilder MMA Yellow Belt

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    Ok! Thanks!
     
  7. Bodybuilder MMA

    Bodybuilder MMA Yellow Belt

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    double post
     
  8. corwin137

    corwin137 Green Belt

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    Plus Juan. Lots of good stuff here.

    Nitpicking a bit, part of the answer is changing the mindset from "stance". Everything should indeed be based on movement, and on context/circumstance.

    Exaggerating, long/free range is going to ask for your body to be more "bladed", but still with a slight distance between your lead toes and rear heel- some say you should be able to put a broomstick or such on the ground between your legs from front toe to rear heel. Since crossing one's feet is no es bueno, doing so facilitates this, and facilitates lateral movement better. Short/clinch range will be much wider, for more reasons than I'll bore you with.

    Other stuff like not being flatfooted and not staying in one place and use of footwork you'll hopefully have in the wake of boxing. There's also a lot of good stuff about this if you search on the net for the "small phasic bent knee stance" argued for by Bruce Lee.
     
  9. Bodybuilder MMA

    Bodybuilder MMA Yellow Belt

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    Footwork? Is it needed in MMA? Or just boxing? I was told it just wastes energy.(I am mostly talking about the bouncing up and down aspect)
     
  10. Rinksterk**

    Rinksterk** Banned Banned

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    lol you have a lot to learn if you think footwork is just bouncing up and down. Footwork is how well and fast you move and place your feet. Its needed for almost every sport that involves moving with your feet. Guys bounce up and down because that creates momentum and makes it easier to move around. I don't know whos giving you this advice but it doesn't waste energy. Boxers don't bounce around because it looks cool.
     
  11. corwin137

    corwin137 Green Belt

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    Referring to a lot more than bouncing. Counterattacks, bob/weave, slips and fades, angling... all kinds of generalship (among other things) is better with good footwork. Overstating, but without it, one is not only a static target, but it just amounts to standing and trading.
     
  12. Garrett E.

    Garrett E. Orange Belt

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    Circling them is footwork. For a popular example, just look at A. Silva. He circles his opponents rather than just comming straight foward. There are also other things. Some people bounce too much and it does nothing, your trainer is probably talking about just bouncing for no reason. If you dont circle/bob+weave its pointless to be bouncing in place.
     
  13. Bodybuilder MMA

    Bodybuilder MMA Yellow Belt

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    I'm a lot better now. thank you guys
     
  14. EffeKt

    EffeKt Blue Belt

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    Wing chun stance.
     

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