What makes a serial killer, nature or nurture?

Discussion in 'Mayberry Lounge' started by MXZT, Nov 5, 2020.

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What makes a serial killer, nature or nurture?

  1. 100% nature, 0% nurture

    1.5%
  2. 90% nature, 10% nurture

    7.5%
  3. 80% nature, 20% nurture

    10.4%
  4. 70% nature, 30% nurture

    11.9%
  5. 60% nature, 40% nurture

    13.4%
  6. 100% nurture, 0% nature

    4.5%
  7. 90% nurture, 10% nature

    7.5%
  8. 80% nurture, 20% nature

    6.0%
  9. 70% nurture, 30% nature

    7.5%
  10. 60% nurture, 40% nature

    4.5%
  11. 50/50

    16.4%
  12. Hard to say, I have no idea.

    9.0%
  1. MXZT Red Belt Platinum Member

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    https://www.psychiatryadvisor.com/h...vironment, trauma, and,many studies over the%

    From Abused Child to Serial Killer: Investigating Nature vs Nurture in Methods of Murder

    “Childhood trauma does not come in one single package.” ― Asa Don Brown

    Deeply traumatic experiences, especially during childhood, can have an even deeper impact in adult life. They can significantly shape an individual’s personality and life choices, spurring research into the connection between childhood abuse and criminal behavior. In particular, the extent of childhood abuse reported among serial killers has raised the question: Are serial killers born or made?

    Nature vs Nurture
    Not all abused children become serial killers, and not all serial killers are victims of childhood abuse. However, the connection between the two cannot be dismissed as just coincidence.

    According to criminologist Dr Adrian Raine, both biologic and social factors contribute to the making of a murderer. Reviews of more than 100 twin and adoption analyses showed that approximately 50% of variance in antisocial behavior is attributable to genetic influences.1 In his book, The Anatomy of Violence, Dr Raine explains that “Genetics and environment work together to encourage violent behavior.” For example, those with a specific variant of the enzyme monoamine-oxidase-A gene are more prone to displaying violent behavior if they have had an abusive upbringing. A child susceptible to genetically driven violent conduct does not necessarily become a criminal. However, genetics, in tandem with environmental factors such as violent childhood experiences, work together to shape a person.2

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    Personal traumas can affect behavioral choices. Take the example of the murderer Richard “The Night Stalker” Ramirez from El Paso, Texas. Found guilty of murdering 13 people in San Francisco and Los Angeles, Ramirez had a disturbed childhood, enduring brutal beatings by his father. Serial killer duo Ottis Toole and Henry Lee Lucas, who were believed to have murdered hundreds of people, were both victims of physical and psychological abuse. Specifically, they were made to dress up as young girls and then beaten.3

    The connection between genetics, social environment, and criminal behavior appears to be a reality, although in varying degrees across criminals. As Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) profiler Jim Clemente said, “Genetics loads the gun, their personality and psychology aim it, and their experiences pull the trigger.”3

    Decoding the Criminal Mind
    Understanding the factors that may contribute to serial killer behavior facilitates effective criminal profiling significantly. At a recent UK conference, researcher Abbie Marono presented findings from her work with ex-FBI profiler Joe Navarro on how different types of childhood abuse can be used to profile serial killers.

    The study involved examining the association among 4 serial killer typologies — lust and rape, anger, power, and financial gain — and 3 categories of child abuse — psychological, sexual, and physical.

    The results suggest that sexual abuse was potentially connected to the rape/lust and anger typologies. It was also associated with a tendency for overkill, postmortem sex, and moving the body to a different location from where the murder took place.

    Psychological abuse was associated more with rape/lust and financial gain typologies. Acts of crime associated with childhood psychological abuse tended to involve torture.

    In contrast, physical childhood abuse was found to be associated with the rape/lust typology, as well as behaviors such as carrying out the act quickly, binding the body, and leaving the body at the crime scene.4

    A landmark study of 50 serial killers found that childhood abuse was more prevalent in lust serial killers. One of the authors of this study, Michael G. Aamodt, explained, “Our data showed that a much higher percentage of serial killers were abused as children than the population in general. It certainly makes sense that the type of abuse received as a child — physical, sexual, or psychological — could influence a serial killer’s behavior and choice of victim.” While it is safe to recognize abuse as a factor contributing to the making of a serial killer, most people who face abuse do not become serial killers. In this study, 32% of all serial killers had no history of abuse.5

    In his book Serial Killers, Joel Norris describes the cycles of violence as generational: “Parents who abuse their children, physically as well as psychologically, instill in them an almost instinctive reliance upon violence as a first resort to any challenge.”6 In another study, serial killers were analyzed to understand the variables of childhood mistreatment and sexual aggression toward victims. The researchers found that serial killers treated badly during childhood tended to sexually assault their victims before murdering them. On the other hand, serial killers who did not experience childhood abuse did not display sexually violent behavior.7

    In a study for the National Institute of Justice, Dr Herrenkohl and his colleagues found that childhood abuse heightened the risk for criminal behavior in adulthood by encouraging antisocial behavior during childhood. There was also evidence of a “cycle of violence” in people with a history of childhood maltreatment, with victims of childhood violence being more likely to demonstrate violence later in life.8

    A Complex Conundrum
    Genetics, environment, trauma, and personality — various factors drive serial killer behavior. Generalizing the cause of criminal behavior would be presumptuous and inaccurate, but the link between childhood abuse and serial killing has been apparent in many studies over the decades. Beyond certain common personality traits, serial killers are unique, shaped by their own extraordinary experiences, circumstances, and mindsets. Whether genetic investigations like brains scans or behavioral studies to gauge serial killer tendencies prove to be groundbreaking in criminal profiling and crime prevention remains to be seen. However, with an extensive and ever-growing treasure trove of evidential research in this space, the key to understanding what makes a serial killer may be just around the corner.
     
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  2. eternaldarkness Red Belt

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    I'm traumatized just looking at all that...
     
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  3. nefti Silver Belt

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    From criminal minds
     
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  4. fungi rl

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    Does anybody get born a killer?
    Killers are made.
     
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  5. Pliny Pete Puts Butts In Seats

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    Its a bit of both, everybody is shaped by their life experiences but you gotta be wired a certain way for those experiences to drive you to mass murder
     
  6. A.A. Riggs sweet ... sweet meat!

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    This division does not exist.

    [​IMG]
     
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  7. Damo321 Blue Belt

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    Three or more murders or “Trophies” as we like to call them!
     
  8. Goodfella86 Gold Belt

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    I'm full Nurture. They'll tell you "Never go full nurture," but they just mistake that very early nurture for nature.

    <CanYouSeeMeNow>
     
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  9. The Audience Blue Belt

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    I got a few chapters into that book The Anatomy of Violence-it is quite eye-opening, but it started to read like a bit like a science paper and i lost interest in continuing. What is detailed is the behavioural changes, inclining people towards violent and pyschopathic behaviour, that are the results of very slight abnormalities to brain matter which can be caused by trauma or genetically inherited.
     
  10. Red Beard Black Belt

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    50/50 is the correct answer here. Serial killers have abnormalities with their brains, specifically in the orbital cortex. That portion of the brain is responsible for things like making moral decisions and impulse control. Scans of the brains or serial killers found little to know activity in those areas. With the combination of nature and the nurturing they get, they may or may not involve themselves with risky behaviors or may be involved in sociopathic behavior. That scale is based upon their upbringing vs. their nature. Some have those brains and just have a lot of unprotected secks with the ladies. Others strangle them afterwards and eat them.
     
  11. Rygu R.I.P. Obie Platinum Member

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    So do you think people are born with BPD/ASPD? I think a lot of them are diagnosed with Conduct Disorder as kids. It's something I haven't researched enough to have a firm stance on.
     
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  12. chill doggie 154XnXhoNmWMGdUp1UVZ7ZEegCMpVNNm7J Platinum Member

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    Nice try FBI.
     
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  13. TapSnapBreak Champ Champ

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  14. Alphaboy Silver Belt

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    I'm no expert but I would think both. There are psychos who were abused as kids their entire lives and snap, and there are people who had normal childhoods who are just insane.
     
  15. Red Beard Black Belt

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    I think people are born with the likeliness of having those disorders. To me and from my experience it is all a balance between nature and nurture.
     
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  16. Badger67 Taxidea taxus

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    Look up child killers. Theres some kids that have loving families that just straight up trh to off their brother or friends etc for no reason. Its terrifying actually.
     
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  17. revoltub Gold Card

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    True psychopaths it's most likely nature. Rage killers nurture plays a bigger part.

    Take a true psycho/sociopath and add a shitty childhood and thats when shit hits the fan.
     
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  18. fungi rl

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    There's got to be some reason.
    Nothing happens for no reason.
     
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  19. Badger67 Taxidea taxus

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    Development in utero if you want to split hairs at that point.
     
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  20. Tone C Gold Belt

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    PROSPERO

    A devil, a born devil on whose nature,
    nurture can never stick, on whom my pains,
    Humanely taken, all, all lost, quite lost.
    And as with age his body uglier grows,
    So his mind cankers. I will plague them all,
    Even to roaring.



    Even Shakespeare asked a similar question.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2020
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