What do you do when your getting Rushed/Hurt?

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by Staring At Fate, Oct 12, 2010.

  1. Staring At Fate

    Staring At Fate Refuse To Lose.

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    In sparring what are you supposed to do circle to your opponents weak hand? I just recently started sparring against a much better fighter who keeps rocking me to knock some of my bad habits which I appreciate but I'm wondering what to do.
     
  2. DkMacaw

    DkMacaw Brown Belt

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    boxing or muay thai?
     
  3. West-206

    West-206 Green Belt

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    It's good for a sparring partner to tag you when you make a mistake like putting your hand down. That's going to get into the habit of keeping your hands up more than anything else. However, if you're getting hit really hard and rocked, don't be above saying something to the dude. You don't want to get hurt too bad and rocked in practice.

    And yes, you should circle to your opponents weak hand (most of the time).
     
  4. Staring At Fate

    Staring At Fate Refuse To Lose.

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    Boxing.
     
  5. EasternWind

    EasternWind Blue Belt

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    there's a lot of things you can do, like cover-up and counter, Bob and weave out of the way, or clinch up (boxing style). This is something your training partners and instructors can help you with better than anyone on sherdog.
     
  6. SAAMAG

    SAAMAG San Antonio Applied Martial Arts Group

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    The general heuristic is that you circle away from the power hand, meaning that with two orthodox fighters the circling would be done counter-clockwise. For two southpaw's it would be clock-wise. For the orthodox vs southpaw it's going to be a battle of footwork and timing because the power hands are on the same side to keep to this rule of thumb.

    That said...you don't HAVE TO always circle in that same direction...but you if you choose not to you need to be prepared for what may come and have the ability to counter or evade the incoming power shots.

    For example, most people will use a 1-2 (jab-cross). Which means that slipping / circling to the outside is safer because slipping / stepping to the inside will end up with you eating a punch. Though there are methods that people use like slipping to the inside of a jab and using an overhand, or slipping to the inside and covering the right hand as they counter punch or move in for hooks / uppercuts.
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2010
  7. ssullivan80

    ssullivan80 see....what had happened was

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    What shot's are you consistently getting "rocked" by? does it happen when your advancing or retreating, are you getting countered or just over-pressured...... Answer this and it will be easier to give more specific instruction.

    As a general rule, yes you should circle to opponents weak side or toward their jab. But if the punch your getting rocked with consistently is a left hook, then ya may want to reconsider. The "weak side" may not necessarily be the lead of your opponent. Why it is important to know what your getting hit with...... some guys work off their jab to set up their right, others use that tuck n roll or peakaboo style boxing where they are actually a bit more square at the shoulders...... a peakaboo or tuck n roll fighters best punch or hardest punch is more often than not a lead hook or UC.....

    Alternatively, the guy is just better as you said.... in which case, ask him how he is getting gloves on you. Make him explain what he is doing to get you in trouble. You say he is trying to help you with some bad habits, well what are those habits? make him explain how those habits are getting you hit....... This is your best bet if you really want to learn what mistakes your making.
     
  8. SAAMAG

    SAAMAG San Antonio Applied Martial Arts Group

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    Good point about the lead hook as well. That's one of my most landed punches...and if I'm southpaw, one of my strongest. I also try to do sort of a "cat playing with the ball of string" thing where I cut off escapes with lead hooks on one side, and my power hand on the other. Works quite well when my confidence is up and theirs is down.

    Good stuff. I make sure to discuss things like this with my group of guys. Even during sparring I'll tell them to do this or that (which isn't always a good idea based on them hitting me when I'm talking). I got my leg caught kicking the body and yelled at him to punch me...just as he rocked the crap out of me. Hey at least they listen! :icon_lol:
     
  9. ssullivan80

    ssullivan80 see....what had happened was

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    Lead hook is probably my favorite punch and most consistent, but i like to use it behind my jab.... im a lanky guy who lives behind a jab, i just start jabbing a little low, toward the middle of the chest or at my opponents forearm (their rear or parry hand), once i get them in a habit of chasing the parry (dropping it low, or reaching out for it), feint the jab and throw the lead hook over or inside the low parry..... if quick enough or against a slower opponent i just throw it right behind a taping jab.

    I agree, using hooks is a great way to cut off escapes, add in short pivots or lateral steps and you can hold a guy in a corner pretty well. If they cover and try to get out i like to use that hook by throwing it at their shoulder or bicep area and kinda pushing with it..... it either knocks there guard down for a straight right or they tuck up tighter and crunch over and makes a great opportunity to throw a rear UC while their looking down! I think the secret to using hooks to cut off escapes is to throw it light on your feet, not set in to it to much, that way you can kinda pull yourself to them...... vs. trying to just muscle them.....

    LOL.... on the coaching and getting smacked, i have done that many a time...... i.e: "when i do this, counter with this" and your expect them to not lay into you because your intentionally giving them the oppening, then your mouthpiece flies across the gym...... and all you can really say is "yeah, like that...." and shake your head!
     
  10. Smw

    Smw Purple Belt

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    While you are getting hit it is important to breathe, and keep your eyes on your opponent. This will make you faster, smoother, better able to react and execute your counters and evasion.
     
  11. Staring At Fate

    Staring At Fate Refuse To Lose.

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    The cross seems to be one I keep getting popped with I've started to adjust my stance and work on my footwork a little bit more. So should I be pumping my jab at all times? Do I ever throw a cross without throwing a cross or is that just when there 100% open?
     
  12. SAAMAG

    SAAMAG San Antonio Applied Martial Arts Group

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    You're getting rocked with the cross a lot...Is that happening with everyone you spar with or just a particular individual?

    Couple other questions...is it being preceded by a jab? Is it happening consistently with a particular action that you're doing (or not doing)? Is it hitting you square-on or from an angle?

    When you are getting hit are you coming in, moving out, trying to circle, etc?
     
  13. ssullivan80

    ssullivan80 see....what had happened was

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    Well, as Vanuken points out there are allot of additional variables to really answer specifically or without watching or seeing you in a ring. But the short of it, the most likely reasons that a guy is vulnerable to the cross are

    1. bringing your jab back low, cross comes over the top

    2. advancing on an opponent without using head-movement or without using your jab to close the distance.

    3. slipping or circling toward the cross side and keeping square at the shoulders with a wide guard

    4. reaching for your shots when your just out of range, especially against a guy with a reach advantage

    5. keeping your guard to open, i.e : when your gloves are up your leaving to much gap or are too square at the shoulders that your an easy target for the cross.

    Circling toward/outside the lead is probably a good idea and if your forced back toward his right try to angle out of the range of his cross or clinch up and turn out so you can get circling back outside the lead, and YES absolutely keep your jab busy, especially when closing the distance. Also, be mindful of the cross and use the jab to deter him from throwing it or making him force it. In short, jab toward that cross hand and jab upward so it is not so easy to fire off that cross, especially if he is coming over your jab with it....... really, just be aware of the cross and knowing you get hit with it consistently work on trying to bait the opponent into throwing it, this way you expect it, or can anticipate it. The jab is an ideal way to do that as well.
     
  14. SAAMAG

    SAAMAG San Antonio Applied Martial Arts Group

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    Precisely.

    I mean it really comes down to being cognizant of your surroundings, and logging when you experience successes and opportunities for improvement. You can do this during your sparring and/or after. But it's an absolute must if you're going to improve.

    The key here...is learning to learn.
     
  15. BigInJapan

    BigInJapan Green Belt

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    a more experienced guy is rocking you and you just started sparring?
    :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:
     
  16. Staring At Fate

    Staring At Fate Refuse To Lose.

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    Usually a few jabs and then a cross from out of hell as soon as I get hit I noticed I quickly put my head down which I realize is a habit I MUST get rid of as soon as I can. Also another thing that really threw me off is I got hit with a body shot that made me uncomfortable for three minutes in a five minute round where I felt I could barely move or breath, then I was so worried about my body I couldn't focus on my head.
     
  17. Steakeater**

    Steakeater** Banned Banned

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    Circle to the left or right. Circle right if you are defensive.

    Circling to the left properly makes you a hard target.
     
  18. thirteen

    thirteen Brown Belt

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    Footwork to get my ass out of trouble + throw jabs and pray for the buzzer to go off lol.
     
  19. ssullivan80

    ssullivan80 see....what had happened was

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    Good point, if done at the right distance/range..... often something that gets overlooked and the general "assumption" is circling right (both orthodox) is safer, not always the case. Circling left at the correct range and without getting pinned on the ropes is a good way to make your opponent take an extra step to get to you, gives you a little more time to gauge a counter.
     

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