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What do you consider as full-time training?

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by BrownShadow**, Oct 12, 2010.

  1. BrownShadow**

    BrownShadow** Blue Belt

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    Currently, I have Muay Thai classes on T and Th, and CSW on M and W. Their all 90 minutes and on Fridays and Sundays, I do strength training(45-60 minutes). Is this what some would consider as FT training? I know its nothing close to what the pros do, but for someone whos aspiring to do this( not as a job replacement, but more of how far can I go, and for the competition aspect)
     
  2. ChiliDavis65

    ChiliDavis65 Blue Belt

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    No. Just as a reference, during the summer I was doing 2 hours of grappling on M/W, 2 hours of stand-up on T/Th, an hour of each on F, and 3 hours of MMA on Sat., and I doubt I will ever step in a ring. If you're serious about it, you should add some morning cardio sessions and up the strength training to 3-4 times per week. Leave a rest day in there too, maybe just some light cardio/stretching.

    Just my opinion, but who the hell am I!?!
     
  3. vjvj

    vjvj Mr. Pibb + Red Vines = Crazy Delicious

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    I think to compete at the ammy level you'll need at least 16-20 hours per week. Pros will be more than that, and of course world-class pros fighting in UFC/K-1/etc. train a real 40 hours/week.
     
  4. Poison Tree

    Poison Tree Orange Belt

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  5. xilliun

    xilliun Brown Belt

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    At the lower amateur level I'd say around 15 hours a week of instructed training is plenty, once you move up to national titles 20 hours would be expected. In my muay thai training I do 12 hours over 5 days a week.

    "Full time" training would be just that, twice a day monday to friday with morning work on saturdays, not including S&C work.
     
  6. paolo27th

    paolo27th Black Belt

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    I trained "full-time" for a whole year in 2009 and have come to the conclusion that "full-time" training is a myth. If you can train 4 hours or more a day then you are probably not doing much in that time.

    As far as I`m concerned 5-6 skill training sessions (including 3-4 of sparring) a week plus 2-3 of conditioning is as much as I can handle while still making progress and avoiding injury. Obviously if you were born doing sports you may have a higher work capacity but again, it`s not how much you train, it`s what you get out of it.
     
  7. NovaUniaoWesty

    NovaUniaoWesty Yellow Belt

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    Kaewsamrit Pro Muay Thai fighters: 4.5 hours of technique (bag, pads, sparring) per day plus 2 hours of conditioning.

    Pro Jiu Jitsu fighters (what I've seen black belts training for pan ams): 3 hours of positional drilling, rolling and technique per day. 1.5 hours anaerobic training per day. Weights 2-3x per week.

    Pro MMA fighters: 2.5 hours striking & 2.5 hours grappling and 3 hours weights and cardio per day.

    I'm in school and working. By the time I'm done with school I should have my purple belt and a strong base in muay thai. Then I'm going to train and work full time for 2 years. Bottom line I won't be competing till I'm ATLEAST 27 (if I even choose to at all).

    No joke fighting is a full time job, and unless you're one of the tippy top guys with tons of sponsorships you don't make dick doing it.
     
  8. sub_thug

    sub_thug Silver Belt

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    It's about quality of training, not quantity. Firas Zahabi doesn't like to have his guys train for more than 60 minute blocks at a time. They will still do 12-15 rounds of pad work, drills, etc, but it is all back to back.

    Classes =/= training. Classes are necessary when you are starting out, but the skills you learn there only give you the tools to train.
     
  9. ambertch

    ambertch Purple Belt

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    I would like to point out that all the guys you hear of who get their BJJ black belt in 4, 5 years - trained like 2 or 3 times a day 6 days a week.

    Let's also distinguish between when you're learning and when you're polishing. A guy who still has a lot to learn, can get more gains out of training multiple times a day than a guy who already has it all down (basically, most pros) and is more concerned with polishing the fine points rather than learning anything majorly new.
     
  10. Mumrik

    Mumrik Silver Belt

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    When you don't have a job on the side.
     
  11. Frode Falch

    Frode Falch Gold Belt Professional Fighter

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    its not just how many hours you train pr day. Most people get enough out of 2 sessions a day.. 5-6 days a week. Its more then that. Rest is just as important. When you dont have any work. You can rest between the 2 sessions.
     
  12. slimeball

    slimeball Green Belt

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    This is exactly the conclusion I came to when I started training 5 day a week. A lot of Sherdog keyboard warriors write up training plans that even world champions would not endure.
     
  13. SportsScience

    SportsScience White Belt

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    Full time training is the amount of training you can fit in each day without excessive injury or excessive damage.

    So that varys from person to person. Alot of the pro's can train and train and it will be ok. Its not like that for everyone.

    Twice a day is good for most people. 2-3 hours per session. With sundays off. Thats my goal.
     
  14. lefthooklowkick

    lefthooklowkick Orange Belt

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    twice a day 2 to 3 hour sessions each. training 8 hours a day really isnt very realistic
     
  15. leftlegkicker

    leftlegkicker White Belt

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    Let's not forget Shane Carwin.
     
  16. Machete Juarez

    Machete Juarez Blue Belt Professional Fighter

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    Morning roadwork
    Afternoon Skill & Sparring session
    Evening classes (drills and conditioning)
    Whack one off before bed

    (a total of around 3 or so hours a day, six days a week)
     
  17. Mumrik

    Mumrik Silver Belt

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    What do you mean? Shane doesn't train full-time. Plenty of UFC fighters don't - often because they can't afford it.
     
  18. Douglas Funnie

    Douglas Funnie Green Belt

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    he trains full time for fights. for the brock lesnar fight he stopped working and concentrated solely on training.
     
  19. vjvj

    vjvj Mr. Pibb + Red Vines = Crazy Delicious

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    I should probably clarify here since I was the one throwing out blanket numbers.

    What you're describing is essentially what I do. An "average" day for me would be warm up, ~2 hours of instruction (padwork, coach sparring, whatever), an hour of conditioning, and then an hour of sparring. I do that four days per week, which comes out to about 16 hours/week.

    Two things to note here are that a) I'm an entry-level fighter and b) I'm old (in my thirties). I threw out higher numbers because the more experienced guys at my gym train a lot more than I do.

    But like others are saying, it varies for each fighter.
     
  20. paolo27th

    paolo27th Black Belt

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    It also varies on the gym and the type of workouts you do. The gyms I currently train at only spar/roll and nothing else. After 1 solid hr of being thrown allover a padded room you`ve had plenty. Same for weights, you can really fry yourself in 1hr of weights to the point where you don`t even want to see the weight room anymore for 2 days at least.

    Of course, if you have technique and pad/bag work to go through then your training times will get longer and longer. But again, it`s not how much time you spend in the gym, it`s what you do when you get there and most importantly what benefit you get from the work you`ve done.
     

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