Weightlifting for boxing?

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by omgitsrick, Mar 11, 2008.

  1. omgitsrick

    omgitsrick Green Belt

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    What do you guys think, should you lift weights for boxing or not? If so how, how many reps, what kind? Mass building exercises like squats and bench, or isolation exercises?

    i need to decide if i should or not, ive been told you should do just calisthenics by the gym trainer, but hes an old timer and might not be as informed and with the times.
     
  2. MeBig

    MeBig Brown Belt

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    you should just do calisthenics because you should practice what you train for and pumping iron is far from it, practically speaking.
     
  3. Jinn

    Jinn *** Kicker

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    I do a modified 5x5 routine with speed work following the same parameters of westside's speed work and it has improved the explosiveness of my punching exponentially. Here's a link to my online training blog where I detail my routine and how it works http://www.veganbodybuilding.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=10530

    This routine along with the boxing CD of Bas Rutten's MMA workout together have gotten me in the best shape of my life
     
  4. Cracky

    Cracky Fanny Pack

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    Weightlifting is widely overlooked by boxers. You can lift in ways that increase explosiveness which translates to power. The guy who trained Spinks for Holmes and Hopkins for Tarver had both of them on a plan which included plyometrics http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plyometrics

    Get some books on it from your local library. This type of weightlifting is dangerous so go light at first. Learn the motions safely.
     
  5. enright3060

    enright3060 Brown Belt

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  6. smileyman22336

    smileyman22336 Banned Banned

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  7. ForeverFiending

    ForeverFiending Blue Belt

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    I agree totally. Any precious time you have for training should be spent training. Other reasons I don't encourage weight lifting is:

    1. the boxers I know are cut like statues and don't touch weights. They just train HARD, lots of heavy bag drills and lots of calisthenics, and they still have a hard time making weight despite the fact they have practically no fat and dehydrate for weigh ins.

    2. It is very easy to injure yourself with weights. One of my trainers has phenomenal skill and is in awesome condition, but he can never fight again because his shoulders are perminently damaged from a weight lifting accident. Despite surgery he's not even supposed to be training and there's nothing that can be done. His shoulders pop out on a regular basis and the more they pop out, the looser they get. :(

    3. I've never had a boxing and/or kickboxing couch tell me to do anything but train and calisthenics. Some are opposed to weights entirely.

    4. I used to have a weight routine before I started training and have seen more results with just training than with weights. A huge difference. Not only do I have more defined muscles, but they are muscles that have purpose. You'de be very supprised now much muscle you build just doing heavy bag work.

    You'll never get everyone to agree on this, so to each his own. But seriously, it takes a good deal of time to enforce a weight lifting routine, so why not just spend that time training? Boxers have some killer muscles and are cut to the bone, even without ever touching weights.
     
  8. smileyman22336

    smileyman22336 Banned Banned

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    Well bruce Lee wasn't bulky and he did weights so it worked for him but it doesn't mean it will work for you. I think if you should do weights like every two days but many reps and do burn outs. It builds muscle endurance but whenever you do weights up the calisthenics a lot and the boxing drills.
     
  9. Daley

    Daley Blue Belt

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    so, it seems that there is a choice that one must make -- big impressive muscles or skill specific excersizes that improve your boxing ability but dont make you big.


    give and take. however, in amateur contests being a beast with skill will take you farther than someone who just works drills.
     
  10. spirez

    spirez Purple Belt

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    I hope this is a joke...

    Infinite Intensity and Never Gymless FTW:

    http://www.rosstraining.com/products.html

    This is EXACTLY what these programmes were designed for. I defy anyone to tell me they don't have 20-30 minutes per day to work on supplemental strength and conditioning...
     
  11. WildCard

    WildCard Blue Belt

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    Weights don't make you bulky caloric intake does.

    Lifting is good stick with your compounds and lift heavy.
     
  12. Todd Gack

    Todd Gack Dutch

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    It's a matter of priority. Weight lifting DONE PROPERLY can help any athlete. But as a fighter your priority should be SPP first and foremost. If you have the time, by all means add in some lifting.
     
  13. Xxcx

    Xxcx The Ghost With The Most

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    Bruce Lee severely injured his back from weight lifting and had to recuperate in the hospital for months.. In that time, he was being told by doctors that he might not ever train again. That is when he started writing all his martial art theories down.
     
  14. Graver

    Graver Blue Belt

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    Floyd Mayweather lifts.
    Kelly Pavlik lifts.

    I lift. I might be an average at best amateur thai boxer, but i feel like to be the best athelete i can be i should incorporate all proven methods of training...HIIT, strength/weight training, plyos, etc.

    I personally use a lot of kettlebell training and feel as if that and dumbell training is the best option for boxers/kickboxers. Just my opinion. Squats and deadlifts are must for ANY athelete imo.

    I agree with the above, rossboxing.com FTW.

    mix it up and see great results
     
  15. JSN

    JSN Bitch Lasagna

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    i saw this 'awesome' excersize on TapouT where they showed hackleman's camp. the were throwing like an 80 pound dumbell, but LIKE A PUNCH! you can't argue wih the results of the best striking camp in mma.
     
  16. ThinkGreen

    ThinkGreen Der √úbermensch

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    What made you choose to put this in the conditioning forum instead of the S+P or Standup forum?
     
  17. IronMaidenfan#1

    IronMaidenfan#1 Brown Belt

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    Like Sonny said, get your technique sorted first, that's the priority, true ko power won't be achieved just through strength, it's all about the hips and how you rotate. Don't get me wrong, lifting is important but it should be in addition to lots of bag/mitt/sparring work.
     
  18. Underdog1030

    Underdog1030 Guest

    For striking i do cardio, weights and push ups. Try punching with weights in your hand.
     
  19. Vice

    Vice Yellow Belt

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    Hours and hours of sport specific practice are what led me to becoming a highly skilled athelete. Intense weight and plyometric training resulted in domination when applying those skills.

    Stick to the Olympic lifts and focus on correct form and explosiveness. Plyometrics could also be very important for you. This aspect of training should supplement you regular MA training. If your goal is to be a better boxer, spend the majority of your time boxing.

    You also need to ask yourself what your goals are. If you are constantly being physically dominated, weight lifting might be very important to you. If you physically dominate your opponents, but are out-classed with skill then you would obviously need to work on technique.


    I take it that most MA for life folks seem to associate weight lifting with what they see in body-building magazines and thus frown on it. That is a generalization, but just from my experience it is true. Plus, I see yoked up guys come into my MA gym all the time and get their ass handed to them. If you want to be an elite athlete you cannot ignore strength and power training, but the majority of your time should be spent on sport specific training.


    And regarding holding weights and punching. I read that is actually bad practice. I am sure some guys are successful who do that, but that does not make it good practice. I was very successful in athletics growing up, but I would take back many of the training methods I implemented like curls, and wearing ankle weights while playing basketball. Sometimes things sound good on the surface, but are actually destructive.
     
  20. TGR74

    TGR74 Brown Belt

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    I will only say one thing and PROPER weight lifting is excellent for injury prevention. If you us it as a supplement and not a way to just get bigger or just get stronger but to help your body by increasing muscle strength and tendon strength to deter injury then you are on the way to reap some added benefits. Even if you just do the "take it easy" approach it will help.
     

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