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Weight Problem?

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by Nosweat, Sep 3, 2010.

  1. Nosweat

    Nosweat Blue Belt

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    I've been training in Muay Thai for about a year, working one on one with a coach based near my office. Did a couple of years boxing before that.

    Still happy with my coach but I thought it would be fun to join a club near my house, do some classes and get training partners.

    Club wants me to join beginners class - Fair enough.

    Problem is, every class starts with 15 minutes of high reps of bodyweight exercises, punctuated by bursts of skipping with no rest intervals as a 'warm up'.

    I don't mind the conditioning in itself but I'm 6' 5", 220 lbs. The next biggest guy in class must be 30lbs lighter than me.

    My gas tank isn't bad for a heavyweight but if I keep up all the reps with the smaller guys, I'm shattered by the time it gets to pad work.

    I'm significantly technically ahead of the other guys in the beginner class, but progression at this club is dependent on being on able to do burpees all day.

    I don't think I'll make any progress with this 'one size fits all' approach to training.

    Is this typical? Or do I need to find a better club? Or just lose some weight?
     
  2. mimo

    mimo Brown Belt

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    Don't think i've ever had a class where we didn't warm up/stretch first so my first thoughs would be that sounds abit excessive. That said, if you do enjoy the content after the start, keep at it and do alot more running to improve your cardio and in time it will probably feel normal.

    Just my opinion mind

    Edit - reread, for a beginners class that actually sounds a horrible way to start a session.
     
  3. c0r1nth14n

    c0r1nth14n Blue Belt

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    There's only two really big guys at my gym, I'd put them at 250 and 230 pounds, all the rest prolly under 190. Whenever we do bodyweight exercises they usually just back out a little early and wait til we finish, then step back in for whatever's next. The coaches don't seem to have a problem with it. Maybe talk to the coach and see if you can do something similar?
     
  4. wallysparx

    wallysparx Orange Belt

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    I'm that fat kid in my gym. I'm 5'11" and 255, and realistically I'm a cruiserweight or light heavyweight who needs to get rid of a beer belly.

    My Muay Thai classes are similar. It's at each person's discretion to come in early to stretch and warm up. Then it's a couple rounds of jump ropes, followed by burpees, situps, pushups, and whatever else they come up with to get going.

    Just keep working on it at your own pace. Usually I'll start the burpees at the same pace as everyone else, but after 30 of them or so I'll be down while everyone else is in the air, and vice versa. Same goes for pushups, I'll start with everyone but once I can't take much more I have no shame in doing them off the knees for a rest. But it does pay off and I'm able to do more every time. By the time we're ready to bang on bags or pads or spar, I'm on my second wind.
     
  5. BigWayner

    BigWayner Yellow Belt

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    My gym is similar to that as well, for the beginner class they work alot conditioning. That way when you are ready for sparring you don't gas out.
    The people at my gym that can't keep up for what ever reason, just either go at a slower rate doing less reps, or back out for a bit to catch their breath. It is kind of everyone's own responsiblity to push them selves to their fullest.
    My advice would be to talk with your trainer and either slow the pace or back out to catch your breath. But make sure you keep pushing yourself so that way you can improve.
     
  6. mjw1

    mjw1 Blue Belt

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    Don't be afraid to run a little bit behind as long as you are pushing yourself.
     
  7. KyleInAction

    KyleInAction ***HOPKINS BELT***

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    The best thing you can do is communicate. People don't seam to realize how many of their problems would be solved just by talking to the other parties involved. Talk to your trainer and work it out with him. The only answer you can get here that will change anything is "move gyms", and that's a horrible idea.

    At 5'11" you could easily be a junior middle-weight/middle-weight. Cruiserweight might be a bit big at your height. RJJ and Tyson both may be 5'11" and have fought at heavyweight, but both were remarkably fast and powerful.
     
  8. oasfc

    oasfc Orange Belt

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    i hate to break it to you but strength in relative to your size, just becauase your heavier dosnt mean you should find it harder to do BW exercises as someone smaller. its most likely either you lack strength/endurance for someone your size or you are are carrying too much body fat. its probably a combination of both.
     
  9. phanattic

    phanattic Orange Belt

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    no offense man but it sounds kinda like whining, just do the conditioning or your technique will become poor after a couple rounds no matter how good it is when you're fresh
     
  10. Nosweat

    Nosweat Blue Belt

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    Thanks to everyone who posted a response.

    Not carrying much body fat, at 6'5" I look pretty skinny for 220lbs. I could certainly do with being stronger, but I'm not convinced that will get me through the high rep bodyweight stuff any better.

    I can put in 6 respectable rounds in sparring without gassing, but I'm pretty sure that if I do the same number of burpees as someone 50lbs lighter, I will be more tired, all other things being equal.

    I think whoever it was that posted about communication, is right on the money. You go to a new gym and everything seems established and immutable, and everyone looks like they're part of the machine, but the reality is always that people do what they have to, to make the training work for them.
     
  11. justkidin

    justkidin White Belt

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    What doesn't kill you makes you stronger, right? The more you push yourself, the better you will get. Just put in the work, and you will be a much better fighter at the end.
     

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