Video - Amateur Muay Thai Exhibition Fight

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by TheJayRaff, May 12, 2014.

  1. TheJayRaff

    TheJayRaff Orange Belt

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    Hey guys,

    It's been a long time since I've posted here but I'm looking for some good ol' internet degradation and tips. My 2nd muay thai fight, this one was just exhibition, no judges. I gassed out worse than I ever have. Ate tons of fruit and some crackers leading up to the fight which I heard afterward was a terrible idea because of the sugar crash beforehand hahaha. Anyway, any analyzing you guys can do for me on this fight or scoring of it would be helpful! Thanks.

     
  2. NAKMUAY18

    NAKMUAY18 Brown Belt

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    It's late so I'll right something more tomorrow. Just wanted to say, if you can throw a straight knee, throw a straight knee not a slapping side knee. And put some fizz on it, you want to drive it through him not tickle him! Stepping knees are fine, but if you can drill them in. Your wouldn't pop a jab when you could bomb a straight right?
    Good job though.
    Apart from the the superman punch at the end :)
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2014
  3. NAKMUAY18

    NAKMUAY18 Brown Belt

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    Ok, so in exhibitions I like to favour kicks and knees. You can still hurt people with 16oz gloves and headgear, but you need to be heavy weight classes of dropping bombs! Saying that, you don't really deal with any of his punches. Your shelling up on the spot, letting him hit you, then throwing back when he's finished. Bob, weave, step out, step in and clinch, just do something to make him stop throwing.

    As far as the body language go's, if you cant make it fake it. At the end of the first he looked just as tired as you but he looked more game. You turned around a couple of times after you broke and looked at your corner. When you guys re engaged, he was walking on to you. You looked more tired.
    It's all bullshit and bluff, you were still throwing at him and you were still in the fight, but he looked like he was less tired. When your exhausted and you look across the ring and the other guy looks fresh it messes with your head. It's doesn't take any more energy to stand up straight, walk in to the action, move a little.
    Last thing is pace yourself. If you would have taken a measure approach to the first round instead of swinging for the fences with him, you had the skills to dominate the second and thirds. you control your own tempo, not him. If he wants to go crazy in the first half of the round, let him. Jab, move, teep, move, you can only sprint for a minute before you need to breath, when he breaths you hit him.
    You showed lots of heart, good job.
     
  4. TheJayRaff

    TheJayRaff Orange Belt

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    I definitely noticed that as well going back and seeing it, pathetic knees on my part. Very embarrassing! No sauce on them. i should have made the space to slam that knee down the center...And yes...oh goodness that superman punch. I thought i could throw that and then halfway through it my body went "Energy levels failing, disregard command!" ...Regrets.

    Hmmm good call on the standing still. I didn't notice I wasn't counter jabbing and I thought I was throwing something back but it was actually very rare. Absolutely true with the pace. My first fight I did the same thing, I went in thinking I was going to keep it slow and technical and then immediately starting scrapping as soon as the first punch was thrown. .. I also failed with my diet this time very badly. I had a sugar crash before the fight and really gassed badly. Didn't think it was even possible to suck that badly with the cardio I had beforehand. Food makes a difference! Who knew :O

    Thanks for the tips man, I really appreciate it! :D
     
  5. Hagelslag2

    Hagelslag2 Brown Belt

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    Judging by the video, there are three things that I think you can make big improvements in, that would benefit you greatly in future fights. I will keep in mind that it's only your second fight, because your performance was pretty good for someone with so little experience.

    First of all, you tend to move in straight lines. Right away in the first round you go straight at your opponent, who answer appropriately by punching you in the face. Your reaction to that is to back up in a straight line, making room for him to attack. That is never a good idea. At 6:00 you basically do a similar thing and walk straight into a teep.

    You were overreaching on some techniques in the fight because you were not positioned properly. For example, at 2:10 you throw a jab that you really have to reach for, miss it and then back out in a straight line again.

    What I would recommend you to do is use your sparring in the ring (I assume you have a ring to train in) to get a good feeling of your positioning. Make it a game for yourself to position your opponent in the spot you want him to be in, by taking control of the center of the ring and cutting of his lateral movement. To do this you won't have to throw a single technique and just learn to position yourself in the ring. When you master that, start to use techniques that are appropriate or the distance you're at.

    This will accomplish a few things. First of all, you will have to exert less energy because you'll use less techniques that amount to nothing. Second, you will be harder to hit because you control the distance.

    Second, I would try to learn how to use level changes better. This ties in with point one, when I say you have to learn to use the appropriate techniques at the right distance. At 3:55 and 4:45 you actually did really well. Your opponent starts a punch combination and you interrupt him with a leg kick. Try to learn to do this for all distances.

    My third and last point is that I would work on breaking the balance of my opponent in the clinch. You had some good positions a couple of times, but I think you could have taken more advantage of them if you'd have played with the balance of your opponent more. This also depends a little on the ref by the way, because this one broke you guys up at some points at which I would have let it continue a little longer.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2014
  6. TheJayRaff

    TheJayRaff Orange Belt

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    Hey man, I appreciate the very detailed response! It was helpful with the times listed in the video as well. I've always had trouble attacking on angles, I only did it two or three times in the fight but it worked every time now that I think of it! Gonna start retreating side to side instead of backwards, it is blatantly obvious now that i watch the video with that in mind. The clinch sucked for me, in the first round I whipped him and actually found it suprisingly easy and then every clinch after that he just pulled my head down to the side and I didn't figure out how to get back up...

    Also, how would you have scored this fight? Rd 1 blue, Rd 2 red, Rd 3...

    Again, thanks for the response man!
     

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