use of time in kids training

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by seamus1979, Feb 28, 2016.

  1. seamus1979

    seamus1979 Green Belt

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2007
    Messages:
    1,128
    Likes Received:
    1
    interested in some people's opinions on this. was chatting to one of the dad's at my son's wrestling club and was chatting about our kids training. I commented about how my son had stopped bjj after two years because he didn't like the new black belt coach at the club. The dad in question is a brown belt and he made the comment he doesn't want his son learning bjj until he turns sixteen and thinks wrestling was the better use of time for his sons training and adding bjj to good wrestler was a better recipe for success than just pure bjj.
    This isn't a pushy dad thread but was just interested in people's opinions on what the dad said.
     
  2. blandy

    blandy Blue Belt

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2003
    Messages:
    569
    Likes Received:
    11
    Location:
    UK
    Success at what? While a wrestling base looks to be a good idea for current mma rules it doesn't mean it's going to be the best every one.
     
  3. lechien

    lechien Gold Belt

    Joined:
    May 9, 2007
    Messages:
    16,240
    Likes Received:
    1,300
    Success in what? Mma?
     
  4. mattemate

    mattemate Brown Belt

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2004
    Messages:
    4,392
    Likes Received:
    1,446
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    I know a guy-- most people in Austin will know who I'm talking about-- who started in JJJ and then BJJ as a kid. He had VERY good skills, probably high level blue to purple belt skills when he was 12 or 13. A couple years later, he gets to high school and starts to wrestle, and it just comes super easy. He got to train with some world class wrestlers, which helped, but basically he ran through everyone in Texas, won the state title a couple of times, lost only a handful of matches in 4 years (and got his purple belt from Relson in the meantime, when he turned 16, so you know it's legit-- Relson is stingy with purple belts). Went to a Big Ten school as a scholarship athlete. Pretty good wrestler in college, but got injured a lot, so didn't compete as much as he would have liked.

    Pretty much the opposite of what this dad was saying, but very successful. There are many paths, not just one.
     
  5. Skip Reming

    Skip Reming Banned Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,840
    Likes Received:
    2,218
    90% of kids training should be dedicated to the retention of candy.
     
    DoctorTaco likes this.
  6. freaky

    freaky Banned Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2015
    Messages:
    6,324
    Likes Received:
    5,523
    Location:
    Inside Sherdog
    Obviously anything + anything > pure anything. Welcome to 1990. Look up MMA.

    Now as for doing wrestling first or bjj it doesn't matter. Wrestling + BJJ > pure bjj and pure wrestling.
     
  7. DoctorTaco

    DoctorTaco Breadhead

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2011
    Messages:
    10,643
    Likes Received:
    3,103
    Location:
    Portland fuckin’ Oregon.
    I'm going to come off as the portland dad, but the time should be spent what ever the kid wants to do. If he likes wrestling better, then wrestle. Big bjj, then that.
     
    dainis, biscuitsbrah and Ton like this.
  8. Uchi Mata

    Uchi Mata Preaching the gospel of heel hooks and left kicks

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2010
    Messages:
    18,558
    Likes Received:
    4,074
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    I think focusing on wrestling makes sense. Wrestling, in the US at least, is mostly a scholastic thing. His best chance to learn and get good at wrestling is when he's in school and has access to the school team. That's not true of Judo or BJJ, he can pick those up whenever. Even if he just does a season or two and decides it's not for him, those skills will benefit him forever in any grappling art.
     
  9. Ton

    Ton The master of Potato Plata

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2010
    Messages:
    555
    Likes Received:
    391
    . Disclaimer, I'm not a parent. But I agree that this is the best approach. The kid will get burned out if they do a sport they don't find appealing, then no one wins.
     
  10. Coati858

    Coati858 Old, slow & short

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2014
    Messages:
    585
    Likes Received:
    375
    Location:
    San Diego
    Piñata BJJ FTW, but my kids will tell you that the soccer/dodgeball/freezetag at the end of class is absolutely critical.
     
  11. Russky

    Russky Green Belt

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2014
    Messages:
    1,037
    Likes Received:
    463
    Most of the kids are scared to be choked, and cannot tolerate hard punches in the face. If your kid has no problem with that, you can take him to BJJ, karate, TKD, boxing, etc. first and train in wrestling/judo later. Otherwise it might be better to start with wrestling first and move on to BJJ sometimes later.
     
  12. Thrawn33

    Thrawn33 JUST BLEED Belt

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2007
    Messages:
    17,882
    Likes Received:
    13,990
    As a past assistant coach for the kids' team (5-10 year olds) of two different judo clubs:

    Games

    Promise them games at the end if they behave. Games that teach skill, but when it all comes down to it, it's fun as hell....even for you the 30-something year old coach that gets to play with them.

    Teens/tweens are another story...I'd rather coach young kids or adults...those little shits are too young to smash as adults when they are insolent and too old ("coo"l...lol) to keep interested with drills and games.
     
  13. Ivaylo Ivanov

    Ivaylo Ivanov FICW President

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2003
    Messages:
    2,473
    Likes Received:
    395
    Location:
    Bulgarium
    This.
    BJJ is private owned club sport, meaning anyone can walk in and practice.
    Wrestling is very limited to time frame and age, a kid can go and learn.
    Also, if the kid suck at wrestling, he will not be able to continue, while in BJJ it doesnt really matter if a student is good or not- as long as he is paying, he will stay in the school.
    In short, my advice is, go for wrestling while he can and later on practice BJJ or whatever the kid wants.
     
    biscuitsbrah likes this.
  14. Codger

    Codger Brown Belt

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2014
    Messages:
    2,793
    Likes Received:
    1,600
    I'd need to define "success" here. it's not like they're going to get rich of either sport so from that perspective Tennis would be better. If you mean being the best grappler they can be - does that really even matter? Chances of them actually giving a shit about that all the way to adulthood is quite low.

    So I'm with the people saying they should just do what they enjoy. Obviously if your kids shows enormous talent at something then it's worth considering being this strategic but for 99% of people it just isn't.
     
  15. Grrrr

    Grrrr BE NICE

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2008
    Messages:
    6,648
    Likes Received:
    5,179
    Location:
    MD
    My boys are 10 & 12. They practice and compete in both wrestling(5yrs) and bjj(1.5yrs) . They also play football and baseball. If I were forced to have them only do one grappling sport it would be wrestling.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.