Tylenol = 'Roids?

Discussion in 'Dieting / Supplement Discussion' started by brownboy, Apr 6, 2008.

  1. brownboy

    brownboy ...

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  2. SnowMongoose

    SnowMongoose Blue Belt

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    Hmm.
    I want to say I read somewhere (aka on these boards) that Ibu had a negative effect on muscle mass/strength...

    anyone qualified/well versed willing to weigh in?
     
  3. MikeMartial

    MikeMartial Black Belt

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    Interesting article, Brownboy!

    Without knowing the exact parameters of the study, I'd lean towards increased intensity in training secondary to the analgesic effects. (and possibly reduced DOMS)

    I'm also curious as to why they studies both ibuprofen AND acetaminophen, since COX-2 inhibition is more prevalent in ibuprofen than the latter. While "similar" OTC drugs, they don't work exactly the same as NSAIDs.
     
  4. Donut62

    Donut62 Black Belt

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    This is pretty interesting. At the advice of others I plan on trying aspirin pre-WO. All I'm familiar with is MM's posts about a decrease in protein synthesis, though anecdotally I hear many positive things. I suppose nothing too terrible will happen to me.
     
  5. TX911

    TX911 Guest

    Brad Morris is a member of our organicmma forum. I need the Aussie death carraige AV posthaste
     
  6. Sinister

    Sinister Doctor of Doom Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    Yes, the idea is that any prostaglandin (sp) inhibitor only stops the body's ability to pick up on inflammation, as opposed to actually healing the damage. Thus, if the signal sent to repair the damage isn't perceived, then the body won't know to repair the damage.

    This could inhibit muscle growth/repair, not help it. In cases such as tendonitis though, it's the lesser of two evils to use NSAIDS.
     
  7. VegasFighter**

    VegasFighter** Brown Belt

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    http://www.physorg.com/news126711822.html


    Ibuprofen or acetaminophen in long-term resistance training increases muscle mass/strength
    Taking daily recommended dosages of ibuprofen and acetaminophen caused a substantially greater increase over placebo in the amount of quadriceps muscle mass and muscle strength gained during three months of regular weight lifting, in a study by physiologists at the Human Performance Laboratory, Ball State University.

    Dr. Chad Carroll, a postdoctoral fellow working with Dr. Todd Trappe, reported study results at Experimental Biology 2008 in San Diego on April 6. His presentation was part of the scientific program of the American Physiological Society (APS).

    Thirty-six men and women, between 60 and 78 years of age (average age 65), were randomly assigned to daily dosages of either ibuprofen (such as that in Advil), acetaminophen (such as that in Tylenol), or a placebo. The dosages were identical to those recommended by the manufacturers and were selected to most closely mimic what chronic users of these medicines were likely to be taking. Neither the volunteers nor the scientists knew who was receiving which treatment until the end of the study.

    All subjects participated in three months of weight training, 15-20 minute sessions conducted in the Human Performance Laboratory three times per week. The researchers knew from their own and other studies that training at this intensity and for this time period would significantly increase muscle mass and strength. They expected the placebo group to show such increases, as its members did, but they were surprised to find that the groups using either ibuprofen or acetaminophen did even better. An earlier study from the laboratory, measuring muscle ****bolism (or more precisely, muscle protein synthesis, the mechanism through which new protein is added to muscle), had looked at changes over a 24 hour period. This
     
  8. BangWhosNxt

    BangWhosNxt Purple Belt

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    A little speechless at the fact that no one has responded to this yet.

    Sounds interesting. Do you have the link to the study? I don't think it said in your post when they were given the drugs.
     
  9. EnjoyKane

    EnjoyKane Banned Banned

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    Hmmmm....
     
  10. XTrainer

    XTrainer Red Belt

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    This is really interesting, I'd like to read it more in detail when I have time.
     
  11. 888Shogun888

    888Shogun888 Blue Belt

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    waiting for the resident brainiacs to weigh in on this. sounds interesting.
     
  12. VegasFighter**

    VegasFighter** Brown Belt

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    Look at the name
    just the link at the top
     
  13. Jake Martin

    Jake Martin Amateur Fighter

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    *continues popping ibuprofen until his stomach bleeds*

    Good to see that I can now justify my use of NSAIDs as a 'supplement' instead of 'oww me hurt too much too train'
     
  14. prodog

    prodog Banned Banned

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    im gonna try it
     
  15. EnjoyKane

    EnjoyKane Banned Banned

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    Man....I really wanna see a follow up study on this. I don't think popping these kinda pills daily is something i wanna take part in.
     
  16. T_Money_

    T_Money_ Blue Belt

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    I didn't reply because I wanted to see what kind of responses it got first.

    Did no one catch the ages of the participants? Or how about the length of excercise. I'm not saying this isn't somewhat interesting, however, anyone who changes there routines based on this info should realize they are making a pretty huge (and IMO pretty stupid) extrapolation.
     
  17. Dead Left

    Dead Left White Belt

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    I've avoided NSAIDS for months because I read that they inhibit protein synthesis. I've been using cissus when I need an anti-inflammatory. Is it possible that the old people sucking down pain relievers just put more effort into their training because it hurt less? Imagine that you're 65 and living on a pension. Some college dudes offer you $800 to come in and lift for the next few weeks, but your joints are hurting like a motherfucker. Do you keep lifting hard or just go through the motions and wait for your paycheck? The study is concerned with the adaptation of the elderly to exercise. I doubt they were working with a bunch of Jack Lalannes.
     
  18. Devil Johnny

    Devil Johnny Guest

    Ibuprofen or acetaminophen in long-term resistance training increases muscle mass/strength

    Taking daily recommended dosages of ibuprofen and acetaminophen caused a substantially greater increase over placebo in the amount of quadriceps muscle mass and muscle strength gained during three months of regular weight lifting, in a study by physiologists at the Human Performance Laboratory, Ball State University.

    Dr. Chad Carroll, a postdoctoral fellow working with Dr. Todd Trappe, reported study results at Experimental Biology 2008 in San Diego on April 6. His presentation was part of the scientific program of the American Physiological Society (APS).

    Thirty-six men and women, between 60 and 78 years of age (average age 65), were randomly assigned to daily dosages of either ibuprofen (such as that in Advil), acetaminophen (such as that in Tylenol), or a placebo. The dosages were identical to those recommended by the manufacturers and were selected to most closely mimic what chronic users of these medicines were likely to be taking. Neither the volunteers nor the scientists knew who was receiving which treatment until the end of the study.

    All subjects participated in three months of weight training, 15-20 minute sessions conducted in the Human Performance Laboratory three times per week. The researchers knew from their own and other studies that training at this intensity and for this time period would significantly increase muscle mass and strength. They expected the placebo group to show such increases, as its members did, but they were surprised to find that the groups using either ibuprofen or acetaminophen did even better. An earlier study from the laboratory, measuring muscle ****bolism (or more precisely, muscle protein synthesis, the mechanism through which new protein is added to muscle), had looked at changes over a 24 hour period. This
     
  19. You cannot say it's not interesting.

    I forget what Tylenol and Advil do. Fever reducers or pain relievers?

    I wouldn't be shocked to see folks popping some Advil around here. lol.
     
  20. TimmyTomatoes

    TimmyTomatoes Orange Belt

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    Wasn't this just posted?
     

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