Trouble with Thai kick

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by Guerrillastyle, Jul 10, 2010.

  1. Guerrillastyle White Belt

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    Lately I have been having trouble pivoting my left foot and turning my hips/right knee over for the rib kick. My leg Kick is good with my downward motion but my higher kicks are not working well...any suggestions, drills, or videos to help? Thanks
     
  2. Brooklyn Green Belt

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    I'm having a somewhat similar problem. My right leg has been getting better though. I still having trouble with anything other than leg kicks though. With my left leg in particular, I can't seem to kick above the waste without it hurting...and I can't seem to throw the kick properly despite paying close attention to the technique involved.

    I'm sure I just need more training/coaching, but it is particularly troublesome since every other concept that I've been introduced to I've been able to at least grasp on an elementary level.
     
  3. SAAMAG San Antonio Applied Martial Arts Group

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    It is sometimes quite difficult to coach someone on the round kick IN PERSON, so on a forum without video it would be even harder to pinpoint your mistakes.

    Take a look in the search for re many threads in the round kick, see I any of that helps.
     
  4. Brooklyn Green Belt

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    Yeah I understand. I'm pretty sure I just hit a plateau. I'm really venting more than anything. I just need some more practice/coaching.

    Oh I have...believe me.:D
     
  5. SAAMAG San Antonio Applied Martial Arts Group

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    Well, then you know that the kick generally starts off from the ground coming up at about a 30 degree angle, and that it turns over at the apex. The hip activates the kick, where the leg is whipped into it's target.

    The three elevations are high, middle, and low, with each kick having its own caveats. With the high kick, you can kick more upwards or actually bring then shin down on the neck. The body kick can kick up into the floating ribs or turn over to hit horizontally into the ribs. The low kick has more variations, with the kick landing horizontally or downward usually.

    Make sure to charge the kick before you actually initiate it, and pivot on the ball of the foot. Outside of that, power and speed are developed through repitition of proper technique. There's no other way to do it.
     
  6. Frostyy1 White Belt

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    I found that after I started doing Yoga I could kick way harder. If your not into that just stretch more and get your technique down pat.
     
  7. Brooklyn Green Belt

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    Yeah. I seem to get the technique very well when I'm throwing low kicks. When it comes to mid kicks, I have a lot of trouble with my left kick. My Right Mid has been getting better. At first I figured that I couldn't pull off the kick well due to my lack of flexibility. Even though that may be an issue, I think the technical problems of my kicking far outweigh any flexibility problem.

    Speaking of, what kind of flexibility exercise would you recommend for increasing the height and strength of my kicks? I know the best method to improve my round kick is well...kicking and coaching, but I'm sure increasing my flexibility and strength through range of motion would be a great supplement. Every flexibility tutorial that I have read/seen that refers to increasing the height of kicks show chambering kicks, like the ones seen in TKD or Karate and not the Thai round kick.
     

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