trouble with punches in MT

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by Higus, Aug 6, 2010.

  1. Higus

    Higus Gold Belt

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    I've only been training for a couple of months and have had a few spars, but I notice that I have a hardest time trying to make my punches connect. My reach is slightly shorter than most of the guys I spar with, so it feels like a I eat a jab every time I try to close the pocket. I've had better luck recognize when the kick is open, and as such, I can usually get a leg kick or 2 to connect in. I have a feeling that it is a caused by a combination of poor judgment of distance and fear of getting hit. My questions:
    - Is this a common problem for beginners that goes away over time?
    - Any drills or tips that will help me get close the distance?
     
  2. TheMadHatter

    TheMadHatter Red Belt

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    try to just use punches until you are comfortable with them, it seems like to me when i am sparring that newer guys just use the kicks the entire time because they are not comfortable with their punches
     
  3. Oh Mah Gawd

    Oh Mah Gawd Orange Belt

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    If your reach is shorter than others and you keep eating jabs then you must focus on FOOTWORK AND HEAD MOVEMENT. Learn to stuff jabs, slip, dip, weave, pivot etc...

    You should be getting inside and pressuring the fight (mainly with your hands). Learn to move your head while punching!!!

    Don't get involved with leg kicks until you master moving your head.

    This guy has some really good boxing videos on youtube.

    YouTube - ‪Pressuring a classic boxer‬‎
     
  4. Brooklyn

    Brooklyn Green Belt

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    I'm exactly the opposite.
     
  5. SAAMAG

    SAAMAG San Antonio Applied Martial Arts Group

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    It is a common thing for beginners because hitting someone who is trying to not get hit is a skill that typically is not natural. Based on the little bit of information you've given us as to your scenario...I can give you this:

    1. Keep your rear hand next to your chin, chin tucked down and your eyes up. If a straight gets your forehead---it's not as big a deal as one getting you on your nose or jaw.

    2. Footwork. Learn to step in when you punch, learn to close the distance smoothly so that the other guy doesn't always realize what's happening before it's too late. I like to use very subtle stepping until all it takes is one quick closing step to hit my target. Use your footwork as well to create better angles.

    3. Combinations. Use a jab of your own to measure, defend, and setup for bigger shots. If you're just going in for a single and eat a jab, that's because the other guy is using his jab. You need to use yours.

    4. Counterpunching. Try to let the other guy open himself up by practicing your counter punching when you spar. In this way you are able to learn the other guy's distance, power, and combinations; while you're able to practice your footwork, evasive movement, in addition to your counter punching.

    5. Feinting and faking. Learn this skill! It will allow you to exploit the opponent's weaknesses and keep him on his toes so that he isn't able to guess what your patterns are. Fake a right and throw a left hook. Fake a body shot then change elevations and go high. Fake right hand and kick to the thigh. Etc etc.


    The best drills...come from sparring situations. When you spar make note of what you're having problems with...be it footwork, defense, setups, and etc. Then you can create a sparring drill/game to work on gaps. For example, if you aren't able to close the distance, have someone work with you in a sparring environment where his job is just to defend while you try to hit him with punches. This will allow him to work defense while you work offense without you having to worry about getting hit. Once you've got a good idea of your own distance and combinations that work well for you, you can build on that by allowing the other guy to jab in the drill. This way you are working your same gap training but stepping it up little by little. He in turn, gets to work his jab which is primary resource in striking.

    I know it's vague, but if you'd like more detail in anything let me know.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2010
  6. Higus

    Higus Gold Belt

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    That's great, thanks a lot!
     
  7. Bennosuke

    Bennosuke Blue Belt

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    The best advise I can give you if you are very very new is to just keep practicing. What Vankuen said is very good advice, and you should try to be mindful of the advice if you can. If you are really new, you may find that even though you have all these ideas for what to improve, the second you start sparring they all go out the window. Don't be too frustrated by that. As you spar more and more, your body and mind will relax. You will have a better sense of your own distances and will be able to pick up on what your opponent is doing and react naturally.

    For now, really focus on throwing combinations while coming forward. Tell yourself, that even if you get hit with a jab, to finish off your combination and attempt to get inside. Commit. You will find with your shorter arms, that if you can get a little inside you will have a greater advantage over the long limbed fellows.
     
  8. austinlarg

    austinlarg Banned Banned

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    Honestly the problem with most muay thai fighters today is that they don't know how to box. Boxing is one of the most essential things you need to learn. It teaches you proper head movement, footwork, punching, and patience. Get in a real boxing gym and work. Even if it's once or twice a week. Soak up everything you can.

    Watch Michael Mcdonald in K-1. I think he is the best at boxing in K-1. He utilizes head movement and punches to get inside. He is one of the shorter guys that kills people at heavyweight. Just think the kickboxing version of a young Mike Tyson.

    But it's all about using your jab and slipping inside. Another thing is don't be afraid to get hit. When you don't think about getting punched, you have an easier time getting inside cause you'll be willing to take a jab in order to deliver punishment. Also, once you're in then stay in.

    Hope it helps.
     

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