Trap bar dead lifts

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by Kennethguye, Nov 1, 2010.

  1. Kennethguye

    Kennethguye Yellow Belt

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    Hey guys, my gym recently just got a new trap bar and Ive never really done a trap bar dead lift before. Have any of you had good experiences with this exercise? or should i just stick with my regular bar dead lift?
     
  2. Tosa

    Tosa Red Belt

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    A trap bar resembles a partial squat from a dead stop more than a deadlift. If you use a trap bar while standing on some mats/plates/whatever is could resemble a full squat from a dead stop. As to whether it has a place in your routine, and what that place might be, depends on your routines/goals.
     
  3. grrthetree

    grrthetree Green Belt

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    Farmers walks.
     
  4. TwoFour Lowkick

    TwoFour Lowkick Orange Belt

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    Because of a recovering knee injury, I have been advised not to do full squats yet, but to build of some strength doing partials, then box squats. You say the deadlift with the trap bar resembles a partial squat more than a deadlift, you think this is a good exercise to use?
     
  5. Kennethguye

    Kennethguye Yellow Belt

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    I just got back from the gym doing them, they felt pretty good i was able to pull 6 1/2 plates each side, definitely a lot easier than a regular dead lift, give them a try they hit my legs awesome. you feel all the weight on the glutes, im definitely going to continue to do them when i feel plateaued on the regular dead lift.
     
  6. Tosa

    Tosa Red Belt

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    Who gave you that advice? What was your knee injury? Have you seen a doctor of sports medicine or a physiotherapist?

    If you got that advice from a GP (general practitioner AKA family doctor) it would be good to get a second opinion. I'm not a doctor, and I'm not going to contradict what a doctor says, nor can I diagnose over the internet...but I do know that GPs, while knowing many things, don't usually have the best understanding of sports medicine, injuries, rehab...and I've been told as much by one of the guys I lift with who is a doctor.

    One issue with partial movements (when doing just the top part) is they allow more weight to be used, but only work a limited part of the ROM. Altogether increasing the risk of injury. This is especially true in squats, or in this case, trap bar deadlifts. Which is why they should have a limited role, if any. Which should be even more true if you're recovering from a knee injury. Keep in mind that strength is specific to joint angle, so the strength you gain from doing partials will carryover very little to full squats...which means it makes little sense, to me, that someone would use partial squats to rehab and progress back to doing full squats.

    If the advice given to you by the doctor is sound, I'd suggest prowler work or sled drags (car pushes if neither of those are an option) and step-ups over trap bar deadlifts or partial squats. Trap bar deadlifts could still be done, but as assistance or for variety. And of course regular deadlifts and posterior chain work should be done as well. You could also consider the use of bands or chains at some point, to reduce the load at the bottom of the squat,
     
  7. TwoFour Lowkick

    TwoFour Lowkick Orange Belt

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    Physical therapist. She thought full squats may be too much for me just now (at least with any significant weight) because my injury had to do with the way my knee tracks and the pain/where the my knee began to track incorrectly is in the deep squat position. I like the band idea. Thanks for the advice
     
  8. Endo

    Endo o hai!

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    IMO, if you can pull conventional DL's then stick with that. If you're injury prone and simply cannot do a conventional DL, then go with the trap bar.

    I had a nagging injury that would make 135 feel like 315, no matter how much time I took off, or how I modified my stance. I decided to start pulling with the trap bar, and its considerably more comfortable and I've yet to have any back pain pulling with the trap bar. I will surely be able to pull significant weight in that position. However from what I know about (and w/ my personal experiences with) both lifts, I would never substitute conventional for trap bar if my back was healthy enough for me to pull conventional.

    But as Tosa stated above, it has much to do with your goals.
     
  9. Klotz

    Klotz Shalom

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    I use them occasionally, but I prefer regular deadlifts.
     

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