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Training enough to become a top competitor?

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by LilLydi9, Oct 2, 2010.

  1. LilLydi9

    LilLydi9 White Belt

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    Hey guys, my current training routine looks like this(not sure if i should be rolling on the mats more because i am tryin to become better at jiu jitsu, but can not get much more mat time)


    monday: Squat or Deadlift (switch every week), powercleans, glute bridges, and abs then 3 hours later muay thai for an hour;
    tuesday- barebell bench, dumbell incline, weighted dips, then ill run some sprints, jiu jitsu 3 hours later for about 2.5 hours
    wednesday-pull-ups dumbell or barebell rows,supported rows, ill hit my lower back light, then run a couple sprints, muay thai 3 hours later
    thursday-standing barbell press, lateral raises, shrugs, farmers walks, jiu jitsu 3 hours later
    friday light box squat, box jumps, sprints, jump rope, jiu jitsu 3 hours later, saturday off, sunday jiu jitsu for 2 hours
    Thanks guys
     
  2. milano

    milano I am the Walrus

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    Being a top contender isn't necessarily about the volume of your training.
     
  3. animalistik

    animalistik Green Belt

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    You're trying to do too much. The simpler the better. Check out the FAQ stickied at the top of the forum. Read through it a couple times then pick out one of the programs and go lift.
     
  4. VoodooPlata

    VoodooPlata Brown Belt

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    A top contender in what?

    Also, don't believe everything Dana says. Fighters don't train 8 hrs a day 6 days a week - they do train a lot, but if you train like that you don't actually get better at anything.
     
  5. paolo27th

    paolo27th Black Belt

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    Actually you get worse! Believe me, been there done that.
     
  6. LZD

    LZD Purple Belt

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    Just do your skills training. Less weights days. Are you training to be a top competitor in sprinting?
     
  7. LilLydi9

    LilLydi9 White Belt

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    no, i want to be a top competitor in jiu jitsu, i can not find another gym that allows me to train more than 4 days a week, i just do not know if 4 days a week will keep me progressing enough, input appreciated
     
  8. J Turner

    J Turner Guest

    That's over-training, alot. Especially for a newbie.

    This is actually an interesting post, becuase I firmly believe that learning the limitations of your own body and it's recovery time is an important aspect of getting the right training cycle. With that in mind, I'd actually reccomend you try out that programe for a few weeks, come back and tell us how much pain you are in! :icon_lol:

    Once you have realized it was naiive to try and do so much at once, I would simply reccomend you give yourself more break days, to let your body recover. Don't believe what the UFC hype machine says about it's fighters training for 6 days a week, hours on end - they train alot, but recovery is just as important as training! Since when is your body ever at 100% if you are aching from the night before?

    Also, read the FAQ's we have about strength routines etc, they are very useful. I would reccomend starting strength, it focuses on the key workouts that excersize the most amount of muscles as possible and makes you really work those deads, squats and benches. The big three!

    Good luck, I'm sure some other posters will have some advice for you. You should also check out the grappling forum for some advice from BJJ experts :)
     
  9. rtfm

    rtfm White Belt

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    So when your doing jj where are you having the most difficulty. If your rolling and getting submitted all the time then is conditioning going to help?

    If your aim is to compete in jj is it your conditioning or strength that's letting you down? A list of your training program will not tell any of us how you should be training. Think like a coach, where are you weak, if it's technique then practice that, if it's strength then get stronger etc. It's completely specific to you and your sport.

    If you want to practice technique more than four times per week then find a partner of similar or better ability and practice, don't become a sandbagger because your stronger or better conditioned.

    If it's training be careful because more is not necessarily better. If your training for strength quantity over quality is a road to nowhere in almost every case. There are a few individuals on here who can advise for strength training.
     
  10. PWR1982

    PWR1982 Green Belt

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    If you are willing to train this much, instead try to find someone to train with and do specific training with them. I really believe in specific training to be great.

    Example - start in guard, he on top tries to stall, and passes only if you really allow him to do it easily, you on bottom are trying to tap or sweep him. When you tap him/sweep him/he passes, you start again. Switch positions after 5 minutes. If you have specific problems, well make training even more specific ... you have a hard time finishing an armbar when someone is really stacking you? Tell your friend to let you get an armbar, but defend it by really stacking you, pressuring you. When you finish him or if he defends it, start again from the same position. Kesting has a good video on this.
    Train what you need, and do it specific. If you just spart for 2 hours instead of drilling something for 2 hours, it won't be as efficient. Sparring is good when you want to connect all parts of your bjj game together, but you won't learn everything at once well, if you train specific, you'll really get a hold of the things you learn, and you will never forget them.

    Another thing that you could do is just spend time learning to think while sparring, you think to yourself "hm what will I do, let's see what mistakes he does. He's overreacting pulling his arm closer to himself when you try an armdrag , I'll try faking an armdrag and then doing an armbar on the other". Just learn to actually use your brain.
     

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