TOP 10 Karate Kumite Counters Used By Japanese Karateka!

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by LeonardoBjj, Feb 5, 2020.

  1. LeonardoBjj Professional-Wrestler

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  2. eternaldarkness Red Belt

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    Don't think it's very good punching technique.
     
  3. rmongler Black Belt

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    They can be appropriate for 'touch of death' rulesets where you are one and done; this can be seen in the more exaggerated lunging put into attacks to cover distance quickly, not unlike sword fencing. You can see some of the elements (parrying with one hand while punching with the other) across the board as well.

    Movement in boxing tends to be centered more around postures that allow for follow-up movement afterwards, though there are cases where highly momentous movements can recommend themselves as well. In such cases, one is still conscious of 'life after movement', but unlike more regular posture of strikes where one is careful not to throw one's balance past a 'point of no return', by putting so much momentum into a movement, it generally renders attempts to move in more backwards angles inappropriate as follow-ups, as such would be highly laboured efforts taking much time with you out of balance, setting up perfect opportunities for an opponent to crack you good (see for example Robert Whittaker vs Israel Adesanya, or Stephen Thompson vs Tyron Woodley).

    The appropriate thing then is to, being conscious of not being one-and-done, actually carry the momentum through fully into the opponent, changing the phase of the fight into the clinch. For fighters proficient in such matters, this can actually be to their advantage even. It also illustrates one of the more essential difficulties many fighters from one-touch competition backgrounds have when competing in more no holds barred competitions; they have a striking style that naturally favors falling into clinches, yet they so often seek to avoid it in fights, and ignore it in training. They are in essence strategically at odds with themselves; either not following up the entailments of a movement pattern to it's conclusion, or not staying balanced in the first place.

    The historic meeting between Max Schmelling and Joe Lewis is a good illustration of these principles:

     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2020
  4. j-boxing Human, all too human

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    Out of his mind.
     
  5. Gfreak Purple Belt

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    Stan, you're literally insane. Just make 1 post and edit all these inane rambling thoughts before a mod bans you for spam.
     
  6. StanClarker Banned Banned

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    <Dana05>
     
  7. shinkyoku Brown Belt

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    point karate kumite techniques for point karate kumite.
    Probably not ideal for use outside those specific rules -atleast not without modification and adaption.
     
  8. Hotora86 #StayTheFuckHome #FlattenTheCurve #WashYourHands

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    That's all still pretty basic in Karate and believe me, you ain't getting any praise from the MMA crowd with this.

    As correctly pointed out by @rmongler this is only suitable for point kumite. I will add that point kumite is a very modern invention and Karate was never intended for this kind of competition. If you look at old Okinawan bunkai it is never one-shotting multiple opponents (like it is presented nowadays) but instead it is a sequence of strikes, grabs, locks and throws done on one opponent. Combinations and follow ups are the core of kata and the original art. The "ikken hissatsu" (kill with one blow) approach is actually borrowed from Kendo. More on the same here:
    http://forums.sherdog.com/threads/kendo-the-shift-in-karate-mentality.3731269/

    Of course training for point kumite has its benefits - it can produce superb timing, defense and footwork - but it takes a very high level practitioner to make it work in MMA (Chinzo and Lyoto Machida, Wonderboy etc.) and said practitioners still must train continuous full-contact to adapt and adjust.
     
  9. StanClarker Banned Banned

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    The more I look @ karate, the more I like it. How people actually do it... it's all over the map.

    Boxing is relatively see how it works... deceptively hard to master. Me, bumbling along w footwork @ home.

    I like the video and then I don't.<WhoJeff>
     
  10. StanClarker Banned Banned

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    I posted a detailed rundown of the 73 punches video,,, which I was asked to burn to the ground so I did. I think it's a phenomenal boxing match.

    But we see the repeat of how karate comes up short against MMA. Ah no, we just saw title contender Corey Anderson make ultra fatal move against Jan B. White belt fighting level. It's MMA that comes up short against MMA.<Varys01>
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2020
  11. StanClarker Banned Banned

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    From what I've watched about karate & MMA, I can see your observations generally play out.

    But I go back & forth on this video. I think the purpose of the karate competitions, from what I gather, is to make it popular with sporting like people like Wonderboy Thompson.... as well as more casual practitioners. A lot of the latter are, to put it bluntly, garbage compared to the challenge of standard boxing practice.

    However, I think it's deceptive to try & judge a whole conclusion about the video from merely watching it, and moreover karate as well. But while I don't like a certain quality about the video; there's also the suspicion that the author is on to more than we as MMA can fathom.

    I think we are seeing a slice or aspect of modern? karate practice a la Japanese style. Not the whole loaf.<Sansa00>
     
  12. JohnPJones Green Belt

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    This kind of sparring/fighting doesn’t even deserve the term kumite, which literally means grappling hands.
     

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