Taking judo instead of BJJ

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by danny_171, Oct 9, 2010.

  1. danny_171

    danny_171 Blue Belt

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    My college offers various martial arts classes and since they're quite cheap I've decided to enroll in some. I have a background in boxing (with a few months of Muay Thai thrown in) and will be competing on the school's boxing team, but they only meet twice a week and I'm looking to pick up some basic grappling skills as a way of cross training. Several of my friends are taking the BJJ class and as much as I'd like to join them, the class is full. For $40, I signed up for a judo class that meets for an hour and fifteen minutes twice a week for ten weeks.

    As previously stated, I have a decent background in boxing and I'm somewhat familiar with the training of martial arts. My grappling experienced is limited to some recreational rolling with wrestling friends...so it's really nonexistent. As much as I'd like to be studying BJJ, I've always been interested in judo and I figure it will compliment my boxing skills quite well. Can anyone give me an idea of what to expect or offer some useful comparisons between judo and BJJ? As this is a beginners class, what equipment should I get? Roughly speaking, how long does it take to understand and begin implementing the basic techniques against a resisting opponent? Anything I should know going into this? I will be doing either BJJ or judo next quarter as well, so the judo is only certain for the next few months.
     
  2. nefti

    nefti Red Belt

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    judo is standing bjj is on the ground
     
  3. Auspex

    Auspex Brown Belt

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    Judo's a funny game...Just like others, I guess.

    Sometimes you click, sometimes you don't.

    If you expect to learn "it" in a few months then you're in for a real shocker. Like any other tool it can take YEARS to really develop it well enough to utilize it, so make a 5 year plan to include Judo and others, as well.

    If, you're a boxer, and you're familiar with the hug/clinch game then you'll understand a tad about the places you'll get to in certain type of comps. While Judo is great in the clinch, you don't actually practice it, usually, from a clinch position, but a little bit farther out from your opponent. Invaluable lessons, either way.

    Learn as much as you can from as many as you can. In time you'll develop your own style and be able to take from certain folk what you need.

    Good luck!
     
  4. BuzzSawski

    BuzzSawski Orange Belt

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    "My grappling experienced is limited to some recreational rolling with wrestling friends..."

    That comment is hilarious, but in all honesty, I'd love to hear the answer to this question.
     
  5. Bullheaded

    Bullheaded Green Belt

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    To tell you the truth, a BJJ class today is 90% training on the ground, working on positions and subs. Judo is more equally training ground and stand up, more focusing on takedowns and subs are a little bit underminded, because less of them are allowed, but since you're an adult classes and bjj is so hyped in the US it might include more than usual.

    All in all, it's a fantastic base to have. If you're looking forward to train BJJ in the future, starting by judo is really great, and will make you a much more complete fighter than a pure bjj training.

    EDIT : I should add the beginning is extremly frustrating though, that's one thing to bare in mind. Time, patience and humility are gonna be your best friend, and this lesson might help your mindset in any other sport.
     
  6. T-Diddy

    T-Diddy Purple Belt

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    thanks for the enlightenment :rolleyes:
     
  7. stile0

    stile0 Purple Belt

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    I do both BJJ and Judo and have been training in both for almost 2 years each. I think for people with no background Judo has the steeper learning curve. Learning the techniques is pretty easy but compared to actually implementing the techniques on moving and resisting opponents is very difficult. Partly because there is a lot of pressure to attack and once you attack there isn't a lot of room to adjust to make things work. It's all or nothing in Judo.

    In BJJ I feel like I can go at any pace I want and even stall if I need to think about a move and so on. I can maybe half lock up a triangle and take my time in adjusting slowly to get it to work.

    I feel like it's naive and ignorant to just separate the two arts by saying one is strictly standing and the other is just groundwork. I'd say one just focuses more on the details of the different aspects of the art more so than the other. Also, the rules make a huge difference.
     
  8. danny_171

    danny_171 Blue Belt

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    Thanks for the replies. I realize that like any martial art, it takes quite a bit of time and practice to get even the basics down, so I'm not expecting to be an expert judoka in a few months. I should also add that at this point in time I don't expect to be competing in either BJJ or judo, and as such I'm not interested all that much in the formal rules or extraneous stuff. I'm looking for techniques that I can incorporate into my striking repertoire to make me a more well rounded fighter, things that actually work in practice and not in the vacuum that is so often created in martial arts academies. I'd ideally like to learn only techniques that do no rely on the gi to be successful, but I think the class I'm taking uses them. One thing that I've learned from boxing is that technique is key, and since I'm used to sparring the live action drills and "pressing the action" are nothing new to me. I have a feeling I'll pick things up relatively quickly, but I could be completely wrong.
     
  9. nni

    nni Orange Belt

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    Why don't you ask the instructor?
     
  10. fourfif**

    fourfif** Banned Banned

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    lol.... you really believe that nefti? maybe if you said "sport judo" is standing or something. bjj is just 1/3 judo.


    edit: good post stile0


     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2010
  11. nefti

    nefti Red Belt

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    i have a question for you, in the world what % of the judo dojos are Sport judo and what % are whatever you claim judo is? Why don't you just sit down a night do a thorough on judo going back 3~4 years on the grappling forum and then you and I can continue this conversation.
     
  12. stile0

    stile0 Purple Belt

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    the only difference i've heard of between competition clubs and recreational clubs is the amount of randori.
     
  13. fourfif**

    fourfif** Banned Banned

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    I have no idea what you just said.

    I can tell you what I meant, and that is that in judo you win by sub, pin, and throw.

    Bjj is basically judo without pins or ippons as ways of winning.
     
  14. CajunJudoka

    CajunJudoka Judo Brown BJJ Brown

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    My Judo school is 50/50 ne-waza, tachi-waza. My Judo teacher coached at the U of Texas with US Olympic coach Stan Wentz. Judo will compliment your boxing background nicely.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2010
  15. Gregolian

    Gregolian .45 ACP Platinum Member

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    This is what my BJJ/Judo instructor told me:
    "Judo is the means to get the fight to the ground and if you need to you can finish from where you end up. BJJ is the art of finishing on the ground if you are the one that gets thrown. Both are needed to be a complete grappler and throw in some wrestling and you will be ace"
     
  16. fourfif**

    fourfif** Banned Banned

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    That's acually very well put. Agreed.
     
  17. Thrawn33

    Thrawn33 JUST BLEED Belt

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    Great quote, that about sums it up.
     
  18. danny_171

    danny_171 Blue Belt

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    I had my first judo class today. Before I get into the details, I may still be able to get into the BJJ class, in which case I'd be rolling either judo or BJJ or two and half hours straight, two nights a week. Figure that's a good way to cross train for boxing.

    So the judo class was only 75 minutes, and in that time I "learned" how to roll properly and four different throws. I put quotes around "learned" because I don't feel like I got all that much instruction. I know from boxing that technique is the most important thing when first learning a martial art, and I don't think I got enough of the details to make what I'm learning effective. This is especially true of the throws, where I was constantly worried that either my partner or I would get hurt. We were both totally new and didn't know how to fall, which made throwing each other a little awkward.

    My instructor wants the class to start sparring in two days...and if judo is anything like boxing, then sparring on your second day is madness. Granted, most of the kids here are new to this as well, but I don't see the point in live action drills when I can't even do the techniques correctly in the first place. I also don't know the names of the throws I learned, but they seemed pretty effective. I'll describe them briefly below to see if you guys can find some videos were they get into details. All of the throws started facing my opponent and grabbing their opposite wrist (for example, grabbing their right wrist with my left hand).

    1) Grab right hand with my left, put my left food outside of their right foot, put my right hand on their shoulder. I then swing my right leg between his right foot and my left one, pull his right hand down, and push with my right on his shoulder while pulling right foot out from under him with my right foot. Basically just pushing him backward while tripping him at the same time.

    2) After grabbing his right wrist with my left hand, I use some footwork to wind up in front of him with my back facing him. I then hook his right arm in my right elbow/over my shoulder, and flip him over my shoulder. This is the throw most commonly associated with judo, and when done correctly is somewhat flashy.

    3) The same as #2, except that instead of hooking his arm and using it to throw him, I put my right hand around his waist and throw him. My instructor said the name of this means "body slam" or something like that.

    4) This one's hard to explain, but I basically start out similarly to #2. I wind up putting my right foot behind his right foot, and put my right hand on his left shoulder. I then proceed to throw him. Not the best description, but I still don't quite understand how this one works.

    All in all, I'm excited about learning the basics of judo, but I'm just hoping that we go a little more in depth with the techniques and making sure we do things correctly. I rolled today with a cup on and I felt like it made things a little uncomfortable, and I'm curious as to what protective gear you guys recommend. Any basic tips or suggestions? Any videos on the moves I so poorly described, assuming you managed to understand what they were?
     
  19. stile0

    stile0 Purple Belt

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    randori in two days? that seems a little odd to me. our beginning judo class learns to ukemi and breakfall for at least 3 weeks before they start doing live throws. safety first!
     
  20. stile0

    stile0 Purple Belt

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    my only suggestion is don't get sucked into strength battles and don't resist the throw. thats how people get hurt.
     

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