Taking a fight with limited training

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by biscuitsbrah, Aug 2, 2015.

  1. biscuitsbrah

    biscuitsbrah Red Belt

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    I'm not talking about a newbie, but someone who only trains 3-4 times a week at most.
    What exactly is the mentality behind these kind of people? How can you feel confident going into a fight knowing that your opponent has possibly been training 5-6 days a week and sometimes even more?

    Do they not understand the risks to their health and livelihood they are taking?
    I guess some people just have this anytime-anywhere kind of natural confidence. Because they got into so many street fights or altercations that a fight is not really a big deal. But to me it is.

    Am I just an anxious, paranoid individual? I feel like a fight is a big thing but many people just look at it as something not so serious.

    Can people with this type of mentality chime in?
     
  2. right hand lead

    right hand lead Purple Belt

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    Yeah I see this all the time in local shows. I gotta believe some of these guys are doing it to be cool n post it on social media. I've seen many people take pro fights, and just by watching them, automatically knowing they have no real training experience at all. Shit is odd, either they honestly don't know how really hurt they can get or are just oblivious to it
     
  3. MEGAhorse

    MEGAhorse Purple Belt

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    Jersey Joe Walcott claimed the heavyweight boxing championship training only 3 days a week.

    I know amateur boxers that train 1-2 times a week and are successful.

    It's not how much you train, but rather HOW you train. That's why you see the classic yuppy boxer who has been training for years and can't throw a punch. They lack the focus and drive necessary to excell at the sport. Complete focus, dedication and intense training will overcome hours of pitter patter nonsense, and depending in the athlete, they can be successful. You can also have an advantage against an over worked fighter with a lack of understanding of basic rest and recovery routines. Notice all the training injuries in MMA?. Those guys are overworked and have poor habits. People say that's because they train many different styles. That's nonsense; it's because they training many different styles with many different TRAINERS that may have horrible training and recovery routines. Boxers and kick boxers pull out way less and there's no way their training routines are less intense. In fact, I'd argue they are even more intense because shot to the head are a goal and the ground game is nonexistent.
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2015
  4. Phlog

    Phlog Dad Belt

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    My mate Ross took a fight after 5 months, through bastard trickery fought an instructor from France.

    He KO'd the dude in 14 seconds. Even though he was obviously outclassed.

    It was amazing.

    He was so relaxed going in, just laughing and joking. I asked him and he said he just figured the worst wasn't so bad and that he'd be ok.

    For me I'm very sketched by it all up until I'm in the ring. I know it's fine once I'm there. I believe in myself and through force of will move forwards.
     
  5. LJD

    LJD White Belt

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    I don't personally have that mentality, actually the opposite, I wanna be fully confident in my skills before fighting. However, I've known plenty of people that have the mentality you're talking about. I think a lot of them want to get that first fight out of the way, for one reason or another. Maybe this is just something they want to cross off the bucket list, or they want to get in there and see how they like really fighting. Or they just want to be able to say they did it.

    I don't think many of them worry about risks to their health or livelihood. That doesn't seem to be something many aspiring fighters worry about, at least from what I've seen.


    I definitely agree that smart training is more important than simply training. It's not about how many hours you train per day, it's what you get out of it. It does seem like a lot of MMA fighters mistake harder training for better training, and that's the kind of attitude that leads to injuries and long term damage.
     
  6. roventu

    roventu Brown Belt

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    how long is enough training though? will you be prepared after 1 year? 2 years? 3 years?

    it's very possible that your opponent has trained longer and more often than you. but they accepted the fight with the same possibility, that maybe you trained longer and more often than them.

    im actually not sure how you can gauge if you're ready yet. read an expertboxing article on it; recommended being able to run 3-5 miles, and if you do well enough sparring with amateurs at your gym and other gyms, then you should be good heh
     
  7. LJD

    LJD White Belt

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    It's impossible to answer how long in terms of time, everyone develops at a different pace. I'd base it on sparring and my coach's opinion. I don't think running ability has much to do with it. Running is a good training supplement, but I can run 5 miles whether I'm in fight shape or not.

    It's always possible your opponent has trained longer than you. All you can do is prepare yourself to the best of your ability. That's why people start with amateur fights, to gauge where they're at and gain experience. After the fight, you learn what you need to work on and what level of competition, if any, you're ready for.
     
  8. TheFinerDetails

    TheFinerDetails Orange Belt

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    No amount of readiness can 100% prepare you for a fight. It's an art more than it is a science, and artworks are never finished.
     
  9. Kiwi Tricker

    Kiwi Tricker Green Belt

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    My last fight I took on less than 5 days' notice. I had 3 training days total. It was not only my first pro fight, it was also my first international fight.

    Sometimes you take a fight even if you can't train for it as fully as you'd like because it's still the best option that you have available.
     
  10. Jkaylor

    Jkaylor Double Yellow Card Double Yellow Card

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    Wtf how does something like this happen? More details pls
     
  11. biscuitsbrah

    biscuitsbrah Red Belt

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    I think he was already an established amateur.
     
  12. Phlog

    Phlog Dad Belt

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    One can walk into a pro fight with no record. There are always shady goings on.
     
  13. Kiwi Tricker

    Kiwi Tricker Green Belt

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    More like this...

    ...and less like this.

    There was a pullout in a pro 8-man elimination tournament in Australia. They needed someone, apparently couldn't find anyone else in Oz so they asked around in NZ. I put my hand up and that was that.

    Prior to this fight my record was 9-1, including holding one WMC title.
     
  14. MuayThaiDude

    MuayThaiDude Yellow Belt

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    I turn 40 in 6 months and only did one smoker and it was a pretty friendly smoker with gear and everything. The usual 3 x 2 minute rounds. It didn't go as planned, I was not really as ready as I should have been and I didn't even warm up beforehand because we had to corner other people. Funny thing was I was not nervous one bit, because I basically thought it would be a glorified sparring match. When he started throwing hard kicks even when blocking most of them it was somewhat of a shock. I was like, "oh shit he's serious." Not being warmed up was the biggest mistake tho. Usually when sparring it is towards the end of class so you are already pretty much as warmed up as you can get. I never sparred before without doing at least a 15 minute jump rope/run etc. It was crucial, I learned the hard way.

    All that being said, I don't know if such a smoker counts as a first fight. To me that should be a sanctioned amateur fight, but I am a purist so maybe I'm wrong.

    I have to hand it to Kiwi Tricker, taking a fight on short notice is a very admirable thing to do. Kiwi's pretty good too. Imagine taking one on short notice and you aren't very good. That takes some balls too. If you have never heard of the Tim Tomashek story you all should Google it. The man has my respect. He basically took a pro boxing fight against Tommy Morrison while sitting in the audience on stand-by. He got beat and it was sloppy, but man did he take it in stride.

    As far as how long you should train starting from scratch, I'd say take your first smoker within a year, see how you do and then try your luck out in a sanctioned fight. As far as running, yeah it's pretty important to have a good base for cardio. I'd say 3 miles in 24 minutes is the minimum for 190 lbs and above, a little less for those who are lighter. I don't know what it is but fighting, especially clinching seems to take all the gas out of the tank.
     
  15. j123

    j123 Pro Sherdogger 500-0-1

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    It depends on the fighter, if this is a fresh guy who's new to combat sports (maybe even sports in general), yeah I'd be worried as well. If its an active competitor, I wouldn't be too worried.

    For the earlier, if someone wants to compete and isn't in training 4-5 days, our coach pulls him/her out

    Honestly, I feel the same way especially but both guys are looking to take each other's head off so the feeling is still the same. The only difference I would say is that maybe the ref will stop if its gets too out of hand.
    I actually had a harder time in my first two smokers compared to my actual ammy fights
     
  16. jm0b

    jm0b Puncher of Holes

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    I had my first fight on the 3 month anniversary of me ever walking in a boxing gym. It was a white collar event at a local bar, dudes with tattoos everywhere screaming for blood ringside etc. Dude I was fighting had a few fights and it turned out on the night a few lbs on me.

    I lost, got concussed and my nose broken, but I don't regret it at all. Haven't been in the ring since but not through lack of wanting to.

    If I were to train for another fight I'd take 6 months and spar at other gyms first. I was 19 and wanted to get in there lol

    To answer your question I think it's when you feel ready. My loss took me down a few pegs for sure but I had a great night and loved every second of it.
     
  17. aries

    aries Yellow Card Yellow Card

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    I took my first fight only training twice a week. I was putting in regular road work so was in decent shape. Only problem was I'd had hardly any sparring because it was predominantly a kids club so there weren't many seniors apart from a couple of much more experienced guys that my coach wouldn't put me in with. After 18 months or so at that gym I'd perhaps had 20 rounds of sparring spread over 6 months.

    My coach convinced me I was ready. Giving him the benefit of the doubt I think he thought I was better than I was because I did ok on the pads but he'd hardly seen me spar. It was a disaster. The other guy had one fight previously in which he bust his load going frenetic in the first round. He opened up on me and kept throwing. I had no defence, froze up and the ref called it off after a minute. I wasn't even slightly hurt and just felt like I was ready to go having shook off the nerves so I protested but that ref wasn't having it. It was utterly humiliating. But in retrospect it was probably the best thing to happen to me and made me more determined than ever to improve.

    After that I joined another gym, got some decent sparring and really started to work on my defence and movement. From that point every second of every minute I trained with purpose. No more going through the motions or slacking off when I knew the coaches attention was elsewhere. I started being more assertive and started putting myself forward a lot more, pestering my trainers and partners for sparring and pad work. My game tightened up immensely and I developed a tenancious resolve. Most importantly I'd tasted the pain and dissapointment of a bad defeat and the memory I would use to fuel me when ever things got tough.
     
  18. MEGAhorse

    MEGAhorse Purple Belt

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    Love stories like this. This is a real fighter; no talk, just work.
     
  19. Tebowned

    Tebowned Boise Dime.

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    How many times have you fought after that?
     
  20. Phlog

    Phlog Dad Belt

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    My first was after 5 months, trained 1 per week for 1 month, 2/week for 2 and 3/week the last two months.

    I was offered the fight 5 days in advance, in a different country. My coach said I was ready and I believed him. Didn't want to let em down.

    Turned out I was more ready than the other guy. He'd trained 3 yrs lazily (I assume) and was a fat heavyweight.

    Opened with a jump scissor kick that missed, I always believe in going first to set the scene. I got the jab knockdown in the first (only I think because of longer arms), then did the jab kick to body a few seconds into the second when my coach shouted 'now' and he didn't get up.

    I bought him a beer later, I didn't pay for another drink all night and was offered lines when I went to the restrooms by fans.

    Good times.

    How did I do it? I accepted the fight and then flew to another country were escape was impractical.
     

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