Stuck with Standard Weights Temporarily

Oblivian

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Right now I'm stuck with having standard weights, minus a power rack, a low ceiling, and a doorway pull up bar. This keeps me from deadlifting, back squats, push press, and weighted pull ups. I am doing a 2 day push/pull split as follows:
PUSH: Bench
Front Squat
Seated OHP
Tricep Extension

PULL: Hang Cleans
Front Squats
Upright Row (at someone's suggestion, I'll probably start doing bent over rows here)
Curls (I'm ready to catch some hell)

On other days, I do dips, pull ups, ab wheel, etc. as I do higher reps. My full log can be found here with my goals if you want more info: http://www.sherdog.net/forums/showthread.php?t=753915

My main question is should regarding the front squats on pull day. Should I maybe do high rep squats this day with lower weight? I would have to be able to lift the weight over my head pretty easily after the set though. Also, I am open to any and all critiques and tweaks on this program. Keep in mind I am focusing on strength, but I equally keep focus on conditioning and muscle endurance. In short, I want to improve strength in weight lifted, conditioning times (100 burpee challenge, running time for distance and sprints, etc.), and muscle endurance (15 pullups is a goal, 100 pushups is a goal although I don't care that much if I hit it, etc.).
 
Why do the standard weights keep you from deadlifting?

Also you could just carry the weights outside to do push presses.
 
Why do the standard weights keep you from deadlifting?

I was going to ask the same thing. If you can bench press you should be able to deadlift. Do you have issues with people below you?
 
I didn't really specify. The bar stands about as high as if you had olympic weight 10 lbs. on each end. I didn't think it was a good idea to do deadlifts from that low. If not, the only thing holding me back is that I only have about 215 lbs in weight. Still, I would love to get back into deadlifting if lifting from that low is "safe".
I'm in a house in the basement with a low ceiling. So I don't have people below me. I'm not too keen on dragging the weight all the way outside due to time issues and often the weather. I try to get my lifting done within an hour to an hour and 15 minutes (this includes stretching time).
I'll be moving elsewhere sometime between June and August. I am going to have my own weight room with a power rack, 2 olympic weight sets, etc. I can't wait.
 
You can just get some phone books and put the weight on those to get the right height.
 
deadlifting with more depth would be better though, would it not? Then when you get 20 kg plates and it's higher of the ground you could deadlift even more because the ROM is less.
 
deadlifting with more depth would be better though, would it not? Then when you get 20 kg plates and it's higher of the ground you could deadlift even more because the ROM is less.

I don't know if this is the best idea but I've seen it done when guys stand on something and deadlift a regular height bar.

You could invest in another weight set. Sears makes a really cheap one that has rubber encased plates.
 
I think the usual way of increasing the ROM is to stand on some plates or a box/platform rather than the bar itself being lower. Dont know if the way you mentioned would be beneficial.
 
wether you stand on something or the bar is just lower because of the size of the plates, does it really make a difference? It's still increasing the ROM.
 
Yeh, I think deadlifting with standard plates would be fine. The only problem would be your amount of weights. I'd still go as heavy as you're able to go with the weights you have...really learning and concentrating on what's going on in the movement. Once you move up to olympic style plates, the weight you were using before will seem like nothing.
 
I didn't really specify. The bar stands about as high as if you had olympic weight 10 lbs. on each end. I didn't think it was a good idea to do deadlifts from that low. If not, the only thing holding me back is that I only have about 215 lbs in weight. Still, I would love to get back into deadlifting if lifting from that low is "safe".
I'm in a house in the basement with a low ceiling. So I don't have people below me. I'm not too keen on dragging the weight all the way outside due to time issues and often the weather. I try to get my lifting done within an hour to an hour and 15 minutes (this includes stretching time).
I'll be moving elsewhere sometime between June and August. I am going to have my own weight room with a power rack, 2 olympic weight sets, etc. I can't wait.

I've deadlifted with smaller plates before and had no problems. You're starting strength will improve alot.
 
I think the usual way of increasing the ROM is to stand on some plates or a box/platform rather than the bar itself being lower. Dont know if the way you mentioned would be beneficial.

This is actually a pretty retarded statement. No offense.
 
Byurr?

Deadlifting from a platform is a great way to increase strength from off the floor.

You might also try unilateral work. Nothing wrong with doing split squats or lunges with a front grip.
 
I don't know if this is the best idea but I've seen it done when guys stand on something and deadlift a regular height bar.

You could invest in another weight set. Sears makes a really cheap one that has rubber encased plates.

I am going to. I am at a point right now where I am very aggressively paying off debt and saving money. My birthday is in May so I may just go ahead and pick up one olympic set. I have enough cash to buy one now, but I am really working hard on a financial savings and debt payoff plan right now.
 
Thanks for the advice all. I will add deadlifts in on my pull day and get rid of the front squats (I'll just do those on push days). I don't know how I got it into my head that it would be so bad starting that low. I also axed out the upright rows and replaced them with bent over rows.
It's a lot harder switching from a big gym to lifting solely at home then I thought it'd be. For conditioning I don't see a problem at all, but for strength it's been a little harder than I thought it would be.
 
It's a lot harder switching from a big gym to lifting solely at home then I thought it'd be. For conditioning I don't see a problem at all, but for strength it's been a little harder than I thought it would be.

Think of the positives though man, I absolutely hate gyms and cant wait to get my own space so I can build a home gym.
 
Think of the positives though man, I absolutely hate gyms and cant wait to get my own space so I can build a home gym.

Yea, I had a nightmare canceling my membership in the town I moved from. Also, I would have to spend so much time there to get what I needed done. With my entire set up I plan on having, it will be about $1,500.00 put into it at least if I count the floor pads and heavy bag set up. I believe it's justified because I spend more time working out than anything else that is considered entertainment. I just have to convince my girlfriend that it is more important than new furniture.
 
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