Starting Judo in my mid-30s... in a third world nation

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by bulldogfire, Jan 21, 2015.

  1. bulldogfire

    bulldogfire White Belt

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2013
    Messages:
    128
    Likes Received:
    1
    I have done a few martial arts in the past and Krav Maga in the US.

    I mainly did Krav but also did BJJ, Muay Thai, MMA and like a couple months of judo... all spread out over a 1 year and 9 months or so. Now in the new country I am in I finally found a place to do martial arts in this poor country. It's a local university Judo club in a small college town.

    It's pretty weird for me as it is really different. First a lot of the class is in a foreign language. I am currently learning that language and the sensei does sometimes explain things to me in English or corrects my technique in English. Being a poor country, the gis people wear are more worn and not in the best of shape.

    Last they don't practice on a traditional mat, but more of a homemade creation of earthen materials (a lot of straw and some other stuff) with a thick tarp on top.

    Today was my first real Judo practice. Before now was mostly conditioning and very light judo training. We practiced some break falls (which I mostly knew from BJJ and the little judo I did) and then worked with the rest of the class. This included several throws... There are no crash mats and we just land on this homemade mat thing they made. I'm like wow... this is tough... being thrown over and over again.

    I'm a small female in my mid-30's... I plan on competing some. Nothing too serious... but the sensei offered me lessons for free and I think he sees me as someone that would be a good person to compete for his team. I am fairly physically fit from the various martial arts I have done in the past, Krav Maga and CrossFit.... but I have had my injuries from these various activities in the past.

    Anyway, just wondering if you think it's too crazy for me to do at my age with these conditions. The team is really nice but they are a poorer team and I just am wondering about accidents. This is definitely not the nice spacious judo dojo I worked with in the states.
     
  2. Mocrates

    Mocrates Ik ben Groot.

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2006
    Messages:
    17,369
    Likes Received:
    5,935
    Location:
    ¬___¬
    Stock up on Icy Hot and have fun.
     
  3. tenktriangles

    tenktriangles Blue Belt

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2009
    Messages:
    604
    Likes Received:
    4
    man. that's tough. judo is hard even on the young, even in a proper facility. i'm about your age, and I'd keep looking. i just don't see it ending well. i see it ending with a serious injury.
     
  4. Kbits

    Kbits Blue Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2014
    Messages:
    576
    Likes Received:
    143
    Location:
    Australia
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2015
  5. Quipling

    Quipling Red Belt

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2012
    Messages:
    9,521
    Likes Received:
    16,603
    Location:
    purgatory
    I'd be worried about two things. First, bad safety facilities generally. Second, depending on what 3rd world country you are in, blood borne diseases are likely to be really common. And they're not likely to have the equipment to deal with them on hand.

    There's a reason nobody does boxing in Botswana anymore, and that's not really third-world these days.
     
  6. bulldogfire

    bulldogfire White Belt

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2013
    Messages:
    128
    Likes Received:
    1
    Oh wow, LOL. That looks not that far off from where I'm training.

    We are not out in the open. At least it is covered. The little training area in the video looks like it is a concrete with packed dirt in it. At the place I train, the outside "mat" area that has the straw in it is made of wood.

    We also have a lot more people training and the area is not that big.

    Not too concerned about the blood diseases where I am.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.