Stance switching in MMA

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by GalegoREB, Aug 10, 2015.

  1. GalegoREB

    GalegoREB He Who Talks Loud, Saying Nothing

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    We have seen in the last years that some fighters like TJ and Cruz have great success when switching stances during their fights. What do you believe is the reason for it's success? And why is switching stances rarely seen in boxing and Kickboxing.
     
  2. a guy

    a guy Black Belt

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    The biggest advantage to stance switching in MMA is that MMA fighters don't know how to attack someone who's switching.
     
  3. fluffball

    fluffball Brown Belt

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    People will always mock MMA fighters for being bad at each art (boxers are notorious for this), but jesus they have so much to think about. People spend 30 years learning to play judo in one stance, and then someone switches stance on them. And now apply that to every single art, each one getting exponentially more complicated when you pair it with another style's threat.

    Edit: To tie back into your question, arts like boxing are INCREDIBLY simple in comparison. That's why boxers are so fucking good at boxing. Boxers throw basically 4 punches, jab, left hook, uppercut and straight right. That's all you do 99% of the time. MMA is a clusterfuck of complexity, so if someone switches stances on you, your brain can't cope. Or at least mine can't. It's so much easier to deal with stance switching in solitary arts.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2015
  4. KillerElite

    KillerElite Carlos Condit knees people in the face

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    Cruz doesn't switch his stance that is TJ's thing. Not a lot of people have people who train as a southpaw.
     
  5. Fire of Youth

    Fire of Youth Green Belt

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    Working your non dominant side takes much more time to develop but once developed, you can reach angles and range and particular combos that will have good fighters scratching their heads.
     
  6. shpboris

    shpboris Blue Belt

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    I would say that quite a lot of boxers do stance switching too. And some of them are world champions. So IMO that is quite working and proven approach.

    P.S.
    Although they mostly switch the stance for some very specific reasons and stay there for very short periods.
     
  7. Tug

    Tug Green Belt

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    i think stance switching has its momentary applications in a combo or setup but once you reset you should reset into your normal stance. obviously there are exceptions like if you're a really high level skilled fighter, or you have a busted up lead leg during a fight and want to stop it taking more damage.

    some mma fighters dip into our mt classes and during sparring will switch to southpaw to match me so it "evens the odds" or something like that. a lot of the time it ends up awkward and they become very immobile and we both learn nothing.

    as someone on sherdog put it: is your worst stance as good as their best stance?
     
  8. shpboris

    shpboris Blue Belt

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    IMO, good example of switching for specific reason/technique is this:



    [YT]yyzX6WhJ-f4[/YT]
     
  9. NAKMUAY18

    NAKMUAY18 Brown Belt

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    Know why a lot of MMA fighters can switch stance so comfortably? Because a lot wrestled for 10years.

    Wrestler generally go power leg forward (leftys go orthodox, righty southpaw). Then when they start mma their coached say "right handed, ok your orthadox" and teach them to stand the opposite way. If after 4 or 5 years somebody says "hey, have you tried switch, the transition between the too is easier than normal.

    Think Matt Hughes, orthodox he'd punch you, south paw he'd take you down.
     
  10. Higus

    Higus Gold Belt

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    The guys who are good at switching stances have a purpose behind them.
    Some good reasons for switching:
    - Some counter fighters prefer the distance of an opposite stance match up
    - Switching between an striking stance and a wrestling technique
    - A lot of pressure fighters are using the switch stance to close off angles on retreating opponents. There are quite a few fighters who only change stance to throw a left kick to the body when an opponent is trying to side step to their left, for instance.
     
  11. j123

    j123 Pro Sherdogger 500-0-1

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    Let me bang mang
    Switch Hitters
     
  12. roventu

    roventu Brown Belt

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    i actually enjoy facing ppl that switch into southpaw (or are southpaws). a lot of techniques that you can work on as a southpaw. usually you can't hit an outside thigh kick on their right leg as easily, but its much easier in mirror stance. also switch kick is more effective. also i think the lead inside kick is easier to land (or less chance of getting checked, a la silva)

    you're right though, sometimes they switch on me without me noticing, and after a few awkward exchanges, im like "oh they're southpaw now"
     
  13. kpt018

    kpt018 Gold Belt

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    You don't see it often in boxing or kickboxing because for most fighters there is a pretty substantial drop off in ability, and their opponents typically don't have a problem fighting against either stance. So unless you are very good from both stances or can bait your opponent into making a mistake it's generally a disadvantage.

    A Guy already nailed it in that a lot of MMA fighters don't know how to deal with the switch.
     
  14. kpt018

    kpt018 Gold Belt

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    Really? When guys switch against me it's so obvious (maybe your opponents are better). And if I know they are weak in something after the switch I go right after it. For example, most guys who switch now have a shitty jab or an awkward switch kick. Advantage me! Savvy fighters can bait you into something though.
     
  15. wang xiangzhai

    wang xiangzhai Per possessĭo ad astra (2)

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    MMA is so young that we still dont know with a 100% of certitude what works and what not. If a few years back i were told that a guy called Pettis will be wining belts with movie-fu kicks off the wall, or Bones performing Akikido-like throws on top level oponents and have dudes spining in the air Matrix style i would
     
  16. bunt

    bunt A Goats eye is the GOAT eye

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    Watch Nieky Holzken vs Raymond Daniels for flashy techniques and stance switching in high level kickboxing.
    Holzken just shelled up with the big gloves and threw basic combo's and destroyed Daniels legs.

    In mma people aren't so great at setting up leg kicks plus they have to worry about the takedown so they can get caught a lot easier.
     
  17. Fire of Youth

    Fire of Youth Green Belt

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    Switch hitting isn't that common in boxing but there are some well known cases of people doing it well and to good effect (e.g. Tyson, Hagler, Hamed, Graham). These guys would switch hit at different ranges with different angles and use it in different ways. Brendan Ingle seems to breed specialty switch hitters. Have a look at some of them and see if you like it.
     
  18. ddjkd

    ddjkd White Belt

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    As others have said, the main reason switching leads can be so effective is it brings up angles of attack and defense that many people just can't fit into their training routines, whatever their reasoning for excluding it may be.

    I'm a righty, and I fight with my strong side foward primarily. That being said, the body mechanics are the same (even if the coordination is not) on both sides.

    In my experience, putting the time in to learn how to use the same mechanics on both sides just gives me more options of escape when I'm getting pressured and more ways to land hits when I'm on the attack.

    The problem is in order to do this you're basically learning the exact same things all over again. Having one side that's well trained helps you learn faster on the other side, but it still requires a significant investment of time etc.

    It's hard enough getting good at a small number of things with one side foward, whatever it may be. Now add in multiple arts, multiple variations of those arts, and it's pretty easy to see why a lot of people don't focus on getting good on both sides.
     

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